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Ussr Foreign Relations South Pacific

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NEWS
February 22, 1987 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union is taking advantage of a complex of economic, colonial and nuclear issues, including the tendency of U.S. tuna fishermen to thumb their noses at local peoples, to penetrate deeper than ever before into an area of the globe that the United States has long thought of as its own: the South Pacific. Last year, for example, the Soviets bought licenses to fish off Kiribati, the former Gilbert Islands, whose capital, Tarawa, was captured by U.S.
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NEWS
June 29, 1987 | DAVID LAMB, Times Staff Writer
The power that rules the Pacific . . . is the power that rules the world. --Sen. Albert J. Beveridge, 1900 After a long period as the exclusive domain of Western powers, the South Pacific has caught the interest of the Soviet Union and is being drawn into the East-West rivalry. The Soviets thus far have limited themselves to making diplomatic and commercial contacts, apparently in an attempt to make themselves acceptable on the small, remote and vulnerable island nations of the Pacific.
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NEWS
January 29, 1987
The South Pacific island nation of Vanuatu and the Soviet Union have signed a one-year fishing agreement that allows Soviet vessels to use Vanuatu's ports. The agreement has been criticized by the United States, Australia and New Zealand on grounds it will give Moscow a foothold in the South Pacific. Vanuatu, west of Fiji and 1,400 miles northeast of Australia, will permit Soviet fishing boats to use its ports to resupply or make repairs.
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, faced with a barrage of skeptical questions from Samoan journalists during a brief stop here en route home, defended French nuclear testing in the South Pacific as environmentally safe and strategically necessary.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The United States and Australia, determined to check increasing Soviet activity in the South Pacific, declared Monday that their alliance is strong and effective despite continuing friction over U.S. trade policy and French nuclear tests. Secretary of State George P. Shultz and Defense Secretary Caspar W.
NEWS
June 29, 1987 | DAVID LAMB, Times Staff Writer
The power that rules the Pacific . . . is the power that rules the world. --Sen. Albert J. Beveridge, 1900 After a long period as the exclusive domain of Western powers, the South Pacific has caught the interest of the Soviet Union and is being drawn into the East-West rivalry. The Soviets thus far have limited themselves to making diplomatic and commercial contacts, apparently in an attempt to make themselves acceptable on the small, remote and vulnerable island nations of the Pacific.
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz, faced with a barrage of skeptical questions from Samoan journalists during a brief stop here en route home, defended French nuclear testing in the South Pacific as environmentally safe and strategically necessary.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The United States and Australia, determined to check increasing Soviet activity in the South Pacific, declared Monday that their alliance is strong and effective despite continuing friction over U.S. trade policy and French nuclear tests. Secretary of State George P. Shultz and Defense Secretary Caspar W.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union is taking advantage of a complex of economic, colonial and nuclear issues, including the tendency of U.S. tuna fishermen to thumb their noses at local peoples, to penetrate deeper than ever before into an area of the globe that the United States has long thought of as its own: the South Pacific. Last year, for example, the Soviets bought licenses to fish off Kiribati, the former Gilbert Islands, whose capital, Tarawa, was captured by U.S.
NEWS
January 29, 1987
The South Pacific island nation of Vanuatu and the Soviet Union have signed a one-year fishing agreement that allows Soviet vessels to use Vanuatu's ports. The agreement has been criticized by the United States, Australia and New Zealand on grounds it will give Moscow a foothold in the South Pacific. Vanuatu, west of Fiji and 1,400 miles northeast of Australia, will permit Soviet fishing boats to use its ports to resupply or make repairs.
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