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NEWS
November 5, 1987 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
No one can be sure whether Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev has the will and imagination to quiet the deep, long-standing fears and suspicions that many in the world have about the Soviet Union. But there is little doubt that Gorbachev, with great charm and tact and flair, has managed in a relatively brief time to push Western diplomats and their old assumptions far off balance.
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NEWS
June 3, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Washington summit, the first superpower meeting of the post-Cold War era, has seen relations between the United States and the Soviet Union begin a historic transformation--away from almost half a century of frozen enmity toward an active willingness to help each other. The two countries still have major differences over several fundamental issues.
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NEWS
June 3, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Washington summit, the first superpower meeting of the post-Cold War era, has seen relations between the United States and the Soviet Union begin a historic transformation--away from almost half a century of frozen enmity toward an active willingness to help each other. The two countries still have major differences over several fundamental issues.
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not just on the plains of Europe that the Cold War is winding down. From Syria to Nicaragua and Ethiopia to Vietnam, the Soviet Union is pulling back. Bent on saving money and removing burrs from its relations with Washington, Moscow is pushing client states toward conciliation more often than conflict these days. "It seems clear that (Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
NEWS
January 6, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union offered Monday to provide bargain space launches for Third World countries as part of a new profit-making service. Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov outlined the proposal in an interview with the official Soviet news agency Tass. He said that spacecraft from other countries would be exempt from Soviet customs and allowed to travel in sealed trucks to the launching site in the Central Asian desert.
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, in the Bush Administration's most hopeful forecast yet for the future of U.S.-Soviet relations, said Thursday that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's foreign policy ideas "offer hope for a radically improved international order." Baker, who next week will make his first visit to Moscow, said in a speech that the United States has been "encouraged" by Gorbachev's steps to reduce Soviet forces in Europe, withdraw troops from Afghanistan and inject a measure of democracy into the Communist political system.
NEWS
January 18, 1988 | From the Washington Post
The Soviet Union has apparently renewed its disinformation campaign in the Third World against the United States, despite recent pledges by top Soviet leaders to end it. U.S. officials said a report in the Ghanaian Times--alleging that the United States gave South Africa chemical weapons that have been turned over to rebel groups in Angola and Mozambique--bears the imprint of a Soviet disinformation "plant."
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS and ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When President Bush announced that he would meet Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev in the Mediterranean this weekend, he described the meeting in deliberately modest terms--"a chance to put our feet up and talk." But the first Bush-Gorbachev summit, only three days away, has already turned into much more. The upheaval in Eastern Europe, where three Soviet Bloc regimes have fallen to reformists in a little more than a month, has forced its way to the top of the summit agenda.
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not just on the plains of Europe that the Cold War is winding down. From Syria to Nicaragua and Ethiopia to Vietnam, the Soviet Union is pulling back. Bent on saving money and removing burrs from its relations with Washington, Moscow is pushing client states toward conciliation more often than conflict these days. "It seems clear that (Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite relaxation of East-West tensions, Soviet advisers in Africa have been sent into battle to support an offensive by the Marxist government of Angola to capture territory long held by pro-Western rebels, the Bush Administration said Monday. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler described the attack, by several thousand Angolan soldiers using tanks and other armored vehicles, as a "dangerous escalation" of the 14-year-old Angolan civil war.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite relaxation of East-West tensions, Soviet advisers in Africa have been sent into battle to support an offensive by the Marxist government of Angola to capture territory long held by pro-Western rebels, the Bush Administration said Monday. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler described the attack, by several thousand Angolan soldiers using tanks and other armored vehicles, as a "dangerous escalation" of the 14-year-old Angolan civil war.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS and ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When President Bush announced that he would meet Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev in the Mediterranean this weekend, he described the meeting in deliberately modest terms--"a chance to put our feet up and talk." But the first Bush-Gorbachev summit, only three days away, has already turned into much more. The upheaval in Eastern Europe, where three Soviet Bloc regimes have fallen to reformists in a little more than a month, has forced its way to the top of the summit agenda.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mikhail S. Gorbachev assumed the leadership of the Soviet Union almost five years ago, he set out to transform the country and stem the collapse of its political and economic system. In the process, he has begun reshaping world politics as well. The reforms that Gorbachev undertook have dramatically altered the Soviet Union's relations with the West, turning what President Ronald Reagan called the "evil empire" into what President Bush now hails as a "partner for peace."
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, in the Bush Administration's most hopeful forecast yet for the future of U.S.-Soviet relations, said Thursday that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's foreign policy ideas "offer hope for a radically improved international order." Baker, who next week will make his first visit to Moscow, said in a speech that the United States has been "encouraged" by Gorbachev's steps to reduce Soviet forces in Europe, withdraw troops from Afghanistan and inject a measure of democracy into the Communist political system.
NEWS
January 18, 1988 | From the Washington Post
The Soviet Union has apparently renewed its disinformation campaign in the Third World against the United States, despite recent pledges by top Soviet leaders to end it. U.S. officials said a report in the Ghanaian Times--alleging that the United States gave South Africa chemical weapons that have been turned over to rebel groups in Angola and Mozambique--bears the imprint of a Soviet disinformation "plant."
NEWS
November 5, 1987 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
No one can be sure whether Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev has the will and imagination to quiet the deep, long-standing fears and suspicions that many in the world have about the Soviet Union. But there is little doubt that Gorbachev, with great charm and tact and flair, has managed in a relatively brief time to push Western diplomats and their old assumptions far off balance.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mikhail S. Gorbachev assumed the leadership of the Soviet Union almost five years ago, he set out to transform the country and stem the collapse of its political and economic system. In the process, he has begun reshaping world politics as well. The reforms that Gorbachev undertook have dramatically altered the Soviet Union's relations with the West, turning what President Ronald Reagan called the "evil empire" into what President Bush now hails as a "partner for peace."
NEWS
January 6, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union offered Monday to provide bargain space launches for Third World countries as part of a new profit-making service. Premier Nikolai I. Ryzhkov outlined the proposal in an interview with the official Soviet news agency Tass. He said that spacecraft from other countries would be exempt from Soviet customs and allowed to travel in sealed trucks to the launching site in the Central Asian desert.
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