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October 27, 1991 | EDWARD TIVNAN, Edward Tivnan is a former Time magazine staff writer. He has contributed to New York magazine, the New York Times Magazine and the Nation
For 30 years, Jerry Mooney carried around in his head some of America's deepest secrets. His wife, Barbara, followed him to posts in Thailand, Okinawa and Ft. Meade, Md., but never knew exactly what her husband did every day. Mooney had pledged never to reveal anything he worked on or saw, and no one he worked with ever expected the quiet, upright, measured and meticulous Mooney to break that pledge. Ever.
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NEWS
January 22, 1992 | Times Staff Writer
In a disclosure announced Tuesday by Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.), Vietnam confirmed that Soviet officials were allowed to question one American POW in January, 1973. Previously, Vietnam had denied that any POWs had been interrogated in Vietnam by the KGB, the intelligence service of the former Soviet Union. But in a note to the U.S.
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NEWS
August 28, 1988 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Igor A. Rogachev arrived here Saturday for weeklong talks aimed at trying to bring peace to Cambodia and at paving the way for normalization of Sino-Soviet relations. "The Soviet Union and China are not the immediate participants to the conflict in Indochina, but as I understand it, both our countries are very much interested in the settlement of the conflict," Rogachev told reporters at Beijing's airport. "We see some light at the end of the tunnel," he said.
NEWS
November 8, 1991 | DARA McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former North Vietnamese army colonel told U.S. lawmakers Thursday that some American prisoners were interrogated by the Soviets during the Vietnam War, but he said he does not know whether any were sent to the Soviet Union for detention. The testimony of Bui Tin, who defected to France last year, addresses a longstanding theory by some activists on the issue of U.S.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Qian Qichen, the first Chinese foreign minister to visit the Soviet Union in more than 30 years, arrived in Moscow on Thursday for talks intended to prepare for a Sino-Soviet summit meeting next year and end the long rift between the two great socialist powers.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze arrived here Wednesday to set the stage for a planned Sino-Soviet summit meeting that would formally end three decades of hostility between China and the Soviet Union. "We are convinced that the summit will open a new chapter in the history of two neighboring countries," Shevardnadze said in a written statement given to reporters upon his arrival at Beijing airport. "We are starting our negotiations fully aware of . . .
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
A new era of improved Sino-Soviet relations got off to a shaky start Saturday with conflicting statements by high Soviet and Chinese officials on whether the two sides have agreed on mid-May as the date for the first Sino-Soviet summit in 30 years. Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze announced at a Beijing press conference Saturday: "We agreed on the date of the forthcoming Soviet-Chinese summit. The visit of (President) Mikhail (S.
NEWS
December 5, 1987 | Associated Press
China's senior leader, Deng Xiaoping, said Friday he won't meet with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev until Moscow brings about a withdrawal of Vietnamese troops from Cambodia. Deng told Yoshio Sakurauchi, the former Japanese foreign minister, that Gorbachev rejected the call for the troop withdrawal, the official New China News Agency reported.
NEWS
March 14, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze wound up a high-profile swing through Southeast Asia on Friday with no sign of movement on the Cambodian conflict, Moscow's most troublesome issue in the region. "There has been no indication of a shift in Soviet policy," a Western diplomat said here after Shevardnadze left for home from Hanoi, the Vietnamese capital. That policy supports the Vietnamese-installed government in Cambodia headed by Heng Samrin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1987 | United Press International
Vietnamese leader Nguyen Van Linh left the Soviet capital Thursday after a four-day visit in which he was praised for efforts to revitalize his nation's economy. Linh, general secretary of the Vietnamese Communist Party, flew out of Moscow after a final ceremony with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev in the Grand Kremlin Palace. In a dinner speech, Gorbachev pledged to continue Soviet cooperation with Vietnam, which is estimated to be receiving at least $3 million a day from the Soviets.
MAGAZINE
October 27, 1991 | EDWARD TIVNAN, Edward Tivnan is a former Time magazine staff writer. He has contributed to New York magazine, the New York Times Magazine and the Nation
For 30 years, Jerry Mooney carried around in his head some of America's deepest secrets. His wife, Barbara, followed him to posts in Thailand, Okinawa and Ft. Meade, Md., but never knew exactly what her husband did every day. Mooney had pledged never to reveal anything he worked on or saw, and no one he worked with ever expected the quiet, upright, measured and meticulous Mooney to break that pledge. Ever.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II, who embarked in high spirits on a swing through Eastern Europe a week ago, grimly returned home Tuesday, praising former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and praying that liberalizing reforms in the Soviet Union survive his fall. "Faced with the news that comes from the Soviet Union, our prayers become even more intense to ask God that that great country may be spared further tragedy.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Soviet documentary about Vietnam that was aired recently on Hanoi television recounted the economic and political reforms enacted in the country under the title "Vietnamese Surprise." The program caused hilarity among officials here because it was shown while Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was grappling with ending the leading role of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. "Perhaps it should have been called 'The Russians Are Astonished,' " one official quipped.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
A new era of improved Sino-Soviet relations got off to a shaky start Saturday with conflicting statements by high Soviet and Chinese officials on whether the two sides have agreed on mid-May as the date for the first Sino-Soviet summit in 30 years. Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze announced at a Beijing press conference Saturday: "We agreed on the date of the forthcoming Soviet-Chinese summit. The visit of (President) Mikhail (S.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze arrived here Wednesday to set the stage for a planned Sino-Soviet summit meeting that would formally end three decades of hostility between China and the Soviet Union. "We are convinced that the summit will open a new chapter in the history of two neighboring countries," Shevardnadze said in a written statement given to reporters upon his arrival at Beijing airport. "We are starting our negotiations fully aware of . . .
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Vietnamese workers sent to East Bloc countries are underpaid and treated unfairly, an influential Hanoi newspaper has charged. Quan Doi Nhan Dan, the Vietnamese army daily, said Hanoi has called for talks "to rectify and overcome the irrationalities found in (labor) treaties already signed." But "patching up" difficulties is not enough, the paper said, demanding more fundamental changes. In a Nov.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II, who embarked in high spirits on a swing through Eastern Europe a week ago, grimly returned home Tuesday, praising former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and praying that liberalizing reforms in the Soviet Union survive his fall. "Faced with the news that comes from the Soviet Union, our prayers become even more intense to ask God that that great country may be spared further tragedy.
NEWS
May 27, 1988 | United Press International
Vietnam announced Thursday that it will withdraw 50,000 troops from Cambodia this year and place its remaining forces under Cambodian command in a move hailed by the Soviet Union, the Communist country's chief ally. In Hanoi, the Vietnamese Foreign and Defense ministries said in a communique broadcast over state-run Radio Hanoi that "the Socialist Republic of Vietnam and the People's Republic of Kampuchea (Cambodia) have agreed to withdraw 50,000 army volunteers in 1988."
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Qian Qichen, the first Chinese foreign minister to visit the Soviet Union in more than 30 years, arrived in Moscow on Thursday for talks intended to prepare for a Sino-Soviet summit meeting next year and end the long rift between the two great socialist powers.
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Igor A. Rogachev arrived here Saturday for weeklong talks aimed at trying to bring peace to Cambodia and at paving the way for normalization of Sino-Soviet relations. "The Soviet Union and China are not the immediate participants to the conflict in Indochina, but as I understand it, both our countries are very much interested in the settlement of the conflict," Rogachev told reporters at Beijing's airport. "We see some light at the end of the tunnel," he said.
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