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Ussr Foreign Relations Yugoslavia

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NEWS
June 29, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through the long years of the Cold War, the Soviet Union saw the breakup of Yugoslavia, with its potential for civil war, foreign interference and escalation, as one of the most worrisome crises that East and West might face in Europe. With that scenario now exploding into reality 500 miles from its border in one of Europe's historic tinderboxes, the Soviet Union is clearly apprehensive but uncertain what it can do in a region that it once thought to be within its sphere of influence.
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NEWS
May 31, 2000 | Reuters
Soviet dictator Josef Stalin was so angry with Josip Broz Tito that his special services were planning to assassinate the Yugoslav leader. The plan was dropped in 1953 when Stalin died, according to a collection of Cold War archives compiled by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, a U.S. think tank. Tito died in 1980.
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NEWS
March 17, 1988 | From Reuters
Kremlin leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev announced proposals Wednesday to reduce tension in the Mediterranean, which he described as "one of the most explosive regions in the world." Addressing the Yugoslav Parliament on the third day of an official visit to this country, Gorbachev also acknowledged that "unfounded accusations" by Josef Stalin against Yugoslav leader Josip Broz Tito in 1948 had inflicted great damage.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scenes of tanks thundering through Moscow after the fall of Mikhail S. Gorbachev and his age of reform have sent an unseasonable chill through Eastern Europe, where past victims of Stalinist aggression fear they are once again at the mercy of the Communist giant to the east.
NEWS
March 15, 1988
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev and his wife, Raisa, arrived in Belgrade for a 5-day state visit and interrupted their schedule to plunge into friendly crowds for handshakes and small talk. At one stop, a World War II memorial, Gorbachev surprised security men by leaving his armored limousine to meet with a cheering throng. Gorbachev later began talks with President Lazar Mojsov and Bosko Krunic, head of the Yugoslav Communist Party.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scenes of tanks thundering through Moscow after the fall of Mikhail S. Gorbachev and his age of reform have sent an unseasonable chill through Eastern Europe, where past victims of Stalinist aggression fear they are once again at the mercy of the Communist giant to the east.
NEWS
March 16, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev visited the grave of Yugoslav leader Josip Broz Tito on Tuesday and then held longer-than-expected talks with current Communist Party leader Bosko Krunic. Gorbachev, the first Kremlin leader to pay an official visit to Yugoslavia in 12 years, laid a wreath at the tomb of Tito, who was branded a traitor to communism by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev warned Tuesday that the continuing crisis in Yugoslavia, with the threat of a civil war there, poses a serious danger to surrounding countries, including the Soviet Union, and to the stability of the European Continent. Gorbachev, concluding two days of talks here with Spanish Prime Minister Felipe Gonzalez, told a press conference that many of the fundamental principles of European security and the "new world order" are at stake in the Yugoslav conflict.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | Reuters
Soviet dictator Josef Stalin was so angry with Josip Broz Tito that his special services were planning to assassinate the Yugoslav leader. The plan was dropped in 1953 when Stalin died, according to a collection of Cold War archives compiled by the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, a U.S. think tank. Tito died in 1980.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev warned Tuesday that the continuing crisis in Yugoslavia, with the threat of a civil war there, poses a serious danger to surrounding countries, including the Soviet Union, and to the stability of the European Continent. Gorbachev, concluding two days of talks here with Spanish Prime Minister Felipe Gonzalez, told a press conference that many of the fundamental principles of European security and the "new world order" are at stake in the Yugoslav conflict.
NEWS
June 29, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through the long years of the Cold War, the Soviet Union saw the breakup of Yugoslavia, with its potential for civil war, foreign interference and escalation, as one of the most worrisome crises that East and West might face in Europe. With that scenario now exploding into reality 500 miles from its border in one of Europe's historic tinderboxes, the Soviet Union is clearly apprehensive but uncertain what it can do in a region that it once thought to be within its sphere of influence.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | From Reuters
Kremlin leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev announced proposals Wednesday to reduce tension in the Mediterranean, which he described as "one of the most explosive regions in the world." Addressing the Yugoslav Parliament on the third day of an official visit to this country, Gorbachev also acknowledged that "unfounded accusations" by Josef Stalin against Yugoslav leader Josip Broz Tito in 1948 had inflicted great damage.
NEWS
March 16, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev visited the grave of Yugoslav leader Josip Broz Tito on Tuesday and then held longer-than-expected talks with current Communist Party leader Bosko Krunic. Gorbachev, the first Kremlin leader to pay an official visit to Yugoslavia in 12 years, laid a wreath at the tomb of Tito, who was branded a traitor to communism by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin.
NEWS
March 15, 1988
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev and his wife, Raisa, arrived in Belgrade for a 5-day state visit and interrupted their schedule to plunge into friendly crowds for handshakes and small talk. At one stop, a World War II memorial, Gorbachev surprised security men by leaving his armored limousine to meet with a cheering throng. Gorbachev later began talks with President Lazar Mojsov and Bosko Krunic, head of the Yugoslav Communist Party.
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