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NEWS
July 4, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conservative die-hards and reformers went to war Tuesday for the hearts and minds of the Soviet Communist Party, with Yegor K. Ligachev denouncing the Gorbachev era's "reckless radicalism" and other leaders defending policies that stripped the "evil empire" label from their nation. One day after President Mikhail S.
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NEWS
January 4, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the greatest success stories of U.S. Cold War espionage was written when CIA officers climbed down into the underbelly of the Soviet Union. In a largely untold tale of American bravery, Central Intelligence Agency officers worked in tunnels below Moscow, ducking into manholes and scrambling through the muck and mire of the city's sewers to install and maintain eavesdropping equipment in tunnels carrying Soviet government and military telecommunications.
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NEWS
June 2, 1988 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
A handclasp and a walk in the woods in Geneva. Frigid stares and tight lips in the blustery cold of Reykjavik. The signing in Washington of a historic treaty on medium-range nuclear weapons. And now in Moscow, a walk through the heart of the "evil empire." The moods and images of the four summits of Ronald Reagan and Mikhail S. Gorbachev have differed in ways both subtle and striking.
NEWS
October 16, 1992
Each week I have changed the political sticker on my car--alternating Perot, Bush and Clinton on my rear bumper. Call me unscientific because I have no margin of error for my survey, but I believe the results are quite significant. On separate occasions, I received a wave, a honk, two thumbs up and a kiss blown on the wind from five attractive women when my Clinton sticker was on display.
NEWS
January 26, 1990 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans are not worried about the prospect of a reunified Germany once again dominating Europe, but the notion scares people in Poland and concerns the British and French, according to a survey conducted jointly by The Times Poll and The Economist. In the abstract, Americans and the French overwhelmingly favor the idea of reuniting West Germany and East Germany nearly 45 years after the crushing defeat of Adolf Hitler's Third Reich.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirteen men accused in the plot to overthrow Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev were charged Wednesday with high treason, a crime that can carry a sentence of death by firing squad, as vigilante groups sprouted around the country to ferret out their accomplices. The Russian Federation prosecutor general made it clear that the net has been cast wider for the others involved.
NEWS
November 30, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shopping for groceries lately, elderly residents here say, recalls the hungry days of World War II when hundreds of thousands of Leningraders starved to death as the Nazis blockaded the city. For the first time since rationing of food was suspended in 1947, Leningraders will have to produce coupons to buy food at state-subsidized prices starting Saturday. "I believe the situation is worse now than after the war," said Dalya V. Kudryavtsyeva, 65, a retired teacher.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Negotiations between Poland's Communist leaders and Solidarity over the new coalition government in Warsaw were at an impasse last August. The issue--how much power the Communists would have--was central to formation of the Solidarity-led coalition and its prospects for success. Resolution of the dispute was crucial, all agreed, but after more than four decades in power, the Communists were finding it difficult to accept Solidarity's control of the government.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev said Saturday that the Soviet Union's constitution could be revised to remove a clause proclaiming the Communist Party as the leading force in society as the country proceeds with the overall restructuring of its political system. But Gorbachev, speaking to an important, daylong meeting of the party's policy-making Central Committee, said that a campaign under way to force such a change immediately is aimed at "demoralizing Communists" and must be opposed.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Messages flashing on the Macintosh computer screens at the offices of San Francisco/Moscow Teleport tell of tanks rumbling through Moscow and crowds massed in the streets shouting support for Boris Yeltsin and other opponents of the right-wing coup. "We are ready to give the hunta (sic) an airplane so they would fly away from our country," one politician is quoted as telling the gathering.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shedding new light on the bloody legacy of Soviet communism, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Wednesday revealed documents on two of its most heinous acts: the downing of a South Korean jumbo jet and the World War II mass murder of thousands of Polish officers. Yeltsin called the 1983 willful destruction of the Boeing 747 "the most horrible catastrophe of the Cold War."
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | STEPHANIE GRACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You need to hang (hang without fail, so that the public sees) at least 100 notorious kulaks, the rich, and the bloodsuckers. "Publish their names. Take away all of their grain. Execute the hostages. "This needs to be accomplished in such a way, that people for hundreds of miles around will see, tremble, know and scream out: let's choke and strangle those blood-sucking kulaks." --Vladimir I. Lenin, 1918 The order by Russian Communist leader Vladimir I.
NEWS
April 25, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the weeks following the explosion and fire at the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station six years ago, the Soviet leadership told lie upon lie to cover up the scope of the disaster and hide the danger it posed to the country's population, according to secret Communist Party documents published Friday by the newspaper Izvestia.
NEWS
March 14, 1992 | VIKTOR K. GREBENSHIKOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an effort to make a comeback, Russia's conservatives--thrust into the political wilderness when the Soviet Union collapsed--plan to mount a double challenge next week to the radical democrats who now hold power here.
NEWS
March 11, 1992 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
It is a nightmare come true for old Stalinists and a dream come true for Western historians. The Hoover Institution, the conservative think tank at Stanford University that was considered a center of anti-Soviet scholarship, has obtained the rights to review and microfilm the previously secret archives of the Communist Party Central Committee and state ministries in the former Soviet Union, officials announced Tuesday.
NEWS
January 22, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The plotters of the August coup had made elaborate plans to turn back the clock to a time just before former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev came to power and were prepared to launch massive Stalinist repressions, Russian prosecutors said Tuesday.
NEWS
April 25, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the weeks following the explosion and fire at the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station six years ago, the Soviet leadership told lie upon lie to cover up the scope of the disaster and hide the danger it posed to the country's population, according to secret Communist Party documents published Friday by the newspaper Izvestia.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | Reuters
A trick telephone call helped track down Boris K. Pugo, the interior minister who killed himself rather than face arrest for his part in this week's coup attempt, an adviser to Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin said Friday. "It was like something out of Hitchcock," Grigory A. Yavlinsky, an internationally known radical economist, said in an interview. Yavlinsky said the head of the Russian KGB, Viktor Ivanenko, invited him to witness Pugo's arrest early Thursday.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As if there were any doubts, the Soviet legislature, a pathetic parody of its former self, solemnly voted the Soviet Union out of existence on Thursday and ordered the remaining shreds of Kremlin power scrapped within a week. "As you noticed today, the flag of the Soviet Union over the Kremlin has been lowered," Kazakh writer Anuarbek Alimzhanov, chairman of the legislature's upper chamber, the Council of the Republics, told the 40 or so deputies who bothered to show up.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boris N. Yeltsin has overthrown one of the most powerful states in modern history, forcing the breakup of the Soviet Union and the resignation of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. But Yeltsin's next moves as Russian leader are question marks. Just how will he pull Russia from the ruins of Soviet socialism? His actual policies remain formulated in vague, sometimes contradictory terms.
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