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NEWS
June 15, 1990 | Associated Press
White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu has accepted an invitation to go to Moscow to help Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev organize his office, a spokesman said Thursday. Sununu already has been offering advice, meeting this week with a delegation of visiting Soviet officials who are interested in how the White House works. President Bush's spokesman, Marlin Fitzwater, said Sununu was invited by a member of the group to visit Moscow and has accepted.
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NEWS
December 20, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, moving swiftly Thursday to bring Soviet rule to an end, issued decrees abolishing the Soviet Foreign and Interior ministries and taking over the Kremlin and most other central government agencies on Russian territory. So sweeping were Yeltsin's decrees--dramatic moves to consolidate his power--that apparently only two Soviet ministries, Defense and Nuclear Energy, still remain independent of his Russian Federation government.
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NEWS
December 12, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yevgeny I. Ignatenko laughed when asked who is now in charge of the Soviet Atomic Energy Ministry. "If we understood that ourselves, it would be easier to answer that question," the ministry spokesman replied. "I suppose we're all our own bosses. Anarchy is the mother of order, they say." Anarchy, in a slow, creeping form, has plagued the tottering remains of the Soviet central government since the August coup attempt.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yevgeny I. Ignatenko laughed when asked who is now in charge of the Soviet Atomic Energy Ministry. "If we understood that ourselves, it would be easier to answer that question," the ministry spokesman replied. "I suppose we're all our own bosses. Anarchy is the mother of order, they say." Anarchy, in a slow, creeping form, has plagued the tottering remains of the Soviet central government since the August coup attempt.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a five-month search, Prime Minister Nikolai I. Ryzhkov on Thursday put forward a candidate for one of the tougher posts in the Soviet government--minister of culture. Nikolai Gubenko, one of the Soviet Union's leading actors and the director of Moscow's Taganka Theater, said he agreed to accept the job only if he could sharply curtail his ministry's authority to control the arts.
NEWS
August 14, 1987 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
The KGB, the Soviet Union's secret police, is enjoying greater support from Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev than any other Soviet institution, according to U.S. and foreign analysts of Soviet affairs. In turn, they say, he seems particularly dependent on the agency and may be in the process of increasing its power.
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev said Sunday that it would be "immoral" for him to quit his post and announced that he and leaders of most of the Soviet republics have designed a new political structure for the vast country and will introduce it during the upcoming meeting of the national Parliament. "I will not resign now. It would be immoral . . .
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet government's top policy-making council Tuesday approved a package of economic reforms that will double food prices in coming months as part of the country's shift to a market economy based on supply and demand.
NEWS
December 21, 1987 | Associated Press
Under the Kremlin's new policy of glasnost (openness), a Muscovite should be able to pick up the phone and call a government agency, but he now has no easy way of getting the number, a newspaper said Sunday. Moscow Pravda complained that the official policy of more openness in selected areas does not extend to the Moscow phone directory, a 720-page hard-cover tome issued last summer that sells for four rubles (about $6). Under the entry for "Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the U.S.S.R.
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The KGB, the sword and shield of Communist rule and the most dreaded force in Soviet society, was ordered dismantled Friday and its spying and information-gathering duties entrusted to new, separate agencies. The landmark decision by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and the other members of the ruling Soviet State Council was openly aimed at breaking the KGB's stranglehold on state security functions, which made it an indispensable but ultimately dangerous adjunct of power.
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev said Sunday that it would be "immoral" for him to quit his post and announced that he and leaders of most of the Soviet republics have designed a new political structure for the vast country and will introduce it during the upcoming meeting of the national Parliament. "I will not resign now. It would be immoral . . .
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Wednesday crippled a vital leg of the Kremlin power troika that tried to overthrow him, disbanding the KGB's ruling body and ordering an investigation into its role in last week's failed coup. The embattled yet ever-defiant Gorbachev has already wrenched the Communist Party's grip from the reins of power by resigning as party leader, severing the political organization from the presidency.
NEWS
December 27, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev nominated a Communist Party apparatchik as his vice president Wednesday, arousing fears among radical lawmakers that his proposed second in command would prove an opponent of bolder economic reforms. Gennady I. Yanayev, former chairman of the Soviet Council of Trade Unions and now in charge of foreign affairs in the party Politburo, declared proudly to the national Parliament, "I am a Communist to the depths of my heart."
NEWS
October 30, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the former annex of a Moscow vegetable store, a U.S. Jewish group and Soviet Jews on Monday launched a unique enterprise--a bureau officially sanctioned by Soviet authorities to help people who want to leave the country for new lives in Israel and elsewhere. "Today is a joyous day for us," Leonid D. Stonov, a Soviet Jewish leader and founder of the new Bureau on Exit, Human Rights and the Rule of Law, told supporters who crowded by the dozens into a small room to celebrate the opening.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | ELIZABETH CHRISTIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Julia Garmash wants to be a journalist, but she knows that it takes more than wishes and hopes. And to get an idea of how the press operates--and perhaps some experience herself--she's working part time in a foreign news bureau in Moscow. What could be more natural for a university-bound 17-year-old? In most places, nothing. But Garmash is a Soviet teenager, and Soviet youth typically have not worked their way through school in the past.
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The KGB, the sword and shield of Communist rule and the most dreaded force in Soviet society, was ordered dismantled Friday and its spying and information-gathering duties entrusted to new, separate agencies. The landmark decision by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and the other members of the ruling Soviet State Council was openly aimed at breaking the KGB's stranglehold on state security functions, which made it an indispensable but ultimately dangerous adjunct of power.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | From Newsday
Vladimir Kryuchkov, the head of the KGB, said Thursday that the Soviet security and intelligence apparatus is "interested in" and "absolutely" supportive of a commission of the new Congress of People's Deputies that would oversee his secret police agency. And he said that under Mikhail S. Gorbachev's program of perestroika , "a great deal of noble aspects of KGB activities" will become more apparent, such as "our struggle against terrorism." In that effort, he added, the KGB had had "certain contacts" with the United States.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | Associated Press
White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu has accepted an invitation to go to Moscow to help Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev organize his office, a spokesman said Thursday. Sununu already has been offering advice, meeting this week with a delegation of visiting Soviet officials who are interested in how the White House works. President Bush's spokesman, Marlin Fitzwater, said Sununu was invited by a member of the group to visit Moscow and has accepted.
NEWS
May 23, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet government's top policy-making council Tuesday approved a package of economic reforms that will double food prices in coming months as part of the country's shift to a market economy based on supply and demand.
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