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NEWS
July 29, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It stands in red brick off Tchaikovsky Street, a mute monument to American hubris, Soviet treachery or both. At this juncture in superpower relations, it is a sore point that both countries probably would rather forget. Don't look for the new U.S. Embassy building to be among the highlights of President Bush's Moscow visit--although he ultimately must decide what to do about it, and White House officials say the matter will be raised with the Soviets.
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NEWS
December 27, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As if there were any doubts, the Soviet legislature, a pathetic parody of its former self, solemnly voted the Soviet Union out of existence on Thursday and ordered the remaining shreds of Kremlin power scrapped within a week. "As you noticed today, the flag of the Soviet Union over the Kremlin has been lowered," Kazakh writer Anuarbek Alimzhanov, chairman of the legislature's upper chamber, the Council of the Republics, told the 40 or so deputies who bothered to show up.
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NEWS
December 20, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having won the Kremlin in a peaceful ambush, Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin swiftly sent his men over to the ancient fortress Thursday to take inventory of his spoils. Dressed in civilian clothes, they went from room to room in the red-brick citadel, the seat of authority for more than seven decades of Soviet rule and five centuries under the Russian monarchy.
NEWS
December 20, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having won the Kremlin in a peaceful ambush, Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin swiftly sent his men over to the ancient fortress Thursday to take inventory of his spoils. Dressed in civilian clothes, they went from room to room in the red-brick citadel, the seat of authority for more than seven decades of Soviet rule and five centuries under the Russian monarchy.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Lenin Library, second only to the U.S. Library of Congress among the world's greatest book repositories, has fallen victim to such devastating neglect that safety inspectors have closed it down and its fate remains unclear, library officials reported this week. "This library can no longer continue to exist without reconstruction," Anatoly Volik, the library's director, told a press conference called to bring attention to its plight.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under siege by almost a thousand Muscovites demanding that its apparatchiks be brought to justice for their role in the failed coup, the headquarters of the Communist Party was closed down Friday and its 2,000 rooms sealed off so that no more evidence could be destroyed or carried away.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As if there were any doubts, the Soviet legislature, a pathetic parody of its former self, solemnly voted the Soviet Union out of existence on Thursday and ordered the remaining shreds of Kremlin power scrapped within a week. "As you noticed today, the flag of the Soviet Union over the Kremlin has been lowered," Kazakh writer Anuarbek Alimzhanov, chairman of the legislature's upper chamber, the Council of the Republics, told the 40 or so deputies who bothered to show up.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III ventured into the once-forbidden vastness of KGB headquarters Friday to a warm welcome, an offer for a cease-fire in the U.S.-Soviet espionage wars--and an unexpected plea for management help from the CIA. "Your visit is a fantastic visit," beamed Vadim V. Bakatin, the liberal reformer who was installed as the KGB's new chairman after his predecessor participated in last month's abortive coup against Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abruptly dropping his diplomatic reserve, outgoing U.S. Ambassador Jack F. Matlock Jr. on Wednesday attacked Congress as the source of his greatest frustrations while in Moscow, accusing lawmakers of ignoring the needs of his staff and even endangering their lives by failing to agree on how to replace the decrepit U.S. mission here.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Lenin Library, second only to the U.S. Library of Congress among the world's greatest book repositories, has fallen victim to such devastating neglect that safety inspectors have closed it down and its fate remains unclear, library officials reported this week. "This library can no longer continue to exist without reconstruction," Anatoly Volik, the library's director, told a press conference called to bring attention to its plight.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III ventured into the once-forbidden vastness of KGB headquarters Friday to a warm welcome, an offer for a cease-fire in the U.S.-Soviet espionage wars--and an unexpected plea for management help from the CIA. "Your visit is a fantastic visit," beamed Vadim V. Bakatin, the liberal reformer who was installed as the KGB's new chairman after his predecessor participated in last month's abortive coup against Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under siege by almost a thousand Muscovites demanding that its apparatchiks be brought to justice for their role in the failed coup, the headquarters of the Communist Party was closed down Friday and its 2,000 rooms sealed off so that no more evidence could be destroyed or carried away.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abruptly dropping his diplomatic reserve, outgoing U.S. Ambassador Jack F. Matlock Jr. on Wednesday attacked Congress as the source of his greatest frustrations while in Moscow, accusing lawmakers of ignoring the needs of his staff and even endangering their lives by failing to agree on how to replace the decrepit U.S. mission here.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It stands in red brick off Tchaikovsky Street, a mute monument to American hubris, Soviet treachery or both. At this juncture in superpower relations, it is a sore point that both countries probably would rather forget. Don't look for the new U.S. Embassy building to be among the highlights of President Bush's Moscow visit--although he ultimately must decide what to do about it, and White House officials say the matter will be raised with the Soviets.
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