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NEWS
December 20, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A red flag still flutters above its beaux-arts facade, its exterior walls still bristle with video cameras, and unblinking guards in olive drab still watch the comings and goings of visitors to ensure order. But the flag of the October Revolution is scheduled to come down by Jan. 1, and these days, the stately Soviet Embassy on 16th Street is anything but orderly inside.
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NEWS
December 20, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A red flag still flutters above its beaux-arts facade, its exterior walls still bristle with video cameras, and unblinking guards in olive drab still watch the comings and goings of visitors to ensure order. But the flag of the October Revolution is scheduled to come down by Jan. 1, and these days, the stately Soviet Embassy on 16th Street is anything but orderly inside.
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NEWS
November 11, 1987
A Soviet newspaper disclosed that 60,000 workers in Moscow-based ministries will be fired in the next two years under Kremlin leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's campaign to streamline government by cutting 50% of all ministry jobs. The newspaper Socialist Industry said the order to eliminate every second government job by 1990 has resulted in turmoil in the ministries, with tearful employees lining up to appeal their firing orders.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Konstantin Demakhin never fooled anyone, of course. When he drove seven consecutive British ambassadors around Moscow, none was ever naive enough to let any state secrets slip to a chauffeur who might as well have worn a "KGB stamp of approval" on his forehead.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Soviet KGB officer recently defected to the United States and identified his contacts in Brussels, including several high-placed people, the Belgian daily La Libre Belgique reported. The newspaper, which did not identify the officer, said the contacts included a Western ambassador in Brussels, an assistant to European Community Commission President Jacques Delors, a high official of the Belgian Defense Ministry and an employee of Interior Minister Louis Tobback. The U.S.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The purge of top officials in the wake of last week's failed coup spread Tuesday to almost every department of the Soviet government as top officials in organizations ranging from the Interior Ministry to the Chamber of Commerce and Industry packed up their bags. In a move to dismantle the old Soviet power structure and consolidate power among officials loyal to Russian Federation President Boris N.
NEWS
December 19, 1987 | JIM MANN and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
The United States Friday expelled a Soviet diplomat at the United Nations after accusing him of spying but went to extraordinary lengths to minimize the incident in an apparent effort to avoid disturbing the current delicate state of U.S.-Soviet relations. The diplomat, Mikhail Katkov, a second secretary assigned to the Soviet mission at the United Nations, allegedly was caught in New York City Thursday by FBI agents as he was trying to acquire unspecified military technology.
NEWS
July 23, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea, subversive and insidious, grew slowly, but in the end it became an overpowering conviction for Oleg D. Kalugin: The socialist system that he was sworn to defend and propagate as an officer of the KGB, the Soviet intelligence and security agency, was simply not worthy of such a commitment.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Konstantin Demakhin never fooled anyone, of course. When he drove seven consecutive British ambassadors around Moscow, none was ever naive enough to let any state secrets slip to a chauffeur who might as well have worn a "KGB stamp of approval" on his forehead.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The purge of top officials in the wake of last week's failed coup spread Tuesday to almost every department of the Soviet government as top officials in organizations ranging from the Interior Ministry to the Chamber of Commerce and Industry packed up their bags. In a move to dismantle the old Soviet power structure and consolidate power among officials loyal to Russian Federation President Boris N.
NEWS
July 23, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea, subversive and insidious, grew slowly, but in the end it became an overpowering conviction for Oleg D. Kalugin: The socialist system that he was sworn to defend and propagate as an officer of the KGB, the Soviet intelligence and security agency, was simply not worthy of such a commitment.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Soviet KGB officer recently defected to the United States and identified his contacts in Brussels, including several high-placed people, the Belgian daily La Libre Belgique reported. The newspaper, which did not identify the officer, said the contacts included a Western ambassador in Brussels, an assistant to European Community Commission President Jacques Delors, a high official of the Belgian Defense Ministry and an employee of Interior Minister Louis Tobback. The U.S.
NEWS
December 19, 1987 | JIM MANN and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
The United States Friday expelled a Soviet diplomat at the United Nations after accusing him of spying but went to extraordinary lengths to minimize the incident in an apparent effort to avoid disturbing the current delicate state of U.S.-Soviet relations. The diplomat, Mikhail Katkov, a second secretary assigned to the Soviet mission at the United Nations, allegedly was caught in New York City Thursday by FBI agents as he was trying to acquire unspecified military technology.
NEWS
November 11, 1987
A Soviet newspaper disclosed that 60,000 workers in Moscow-based ministries will be fired in the next two years under Kremlin leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's campaign to streamline government by cutting 50% of all ministry jobs. The newspaper Socialist Industry said the order to eliminate every second government job by 1990 has resulted in turmoil in the ministries, with tearful employees lining up to appeal their firing orders.
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