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NEWS
November 18, 1988 | Associated Press
A illness that caused 127 children in a Ukrainian town to lose their hair was probably caused by acid rain that carried high doses of thallium, a newspaper reported Thursday. "Since there are no sources of the discharge of thallium into the environment in Chernovtsy and its environs, a conclusion was drawn that the chemical was introduced to the area by acid rains in July," the Communist Party daily Pravda said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1998
Strains of tuberculosis that are resistant to front-line antibiotics are emerging around the world and are especially common in parts of the former Soviet Union, according to a World Health Organization survey reported in today's New England Journal of Medicine. WHO found that although multi-drug resistance is still generally rare, a few countries have significant problems. Worldwide, 1.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1998
Strains of tuberculosis that are resistant to front-line antibiotics are emerging around the world and are especially common in parts of the former Soviet Union, according to a World Health Organization survey reported in today's New England Journal of Medicine. WHO found that although multi-drug resistance is still generally rare, a few countries have significant problems. Worldwide, 1.
NEWS
April 14, 1992 | BETTYANN KEVLES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One measure of the magnitude of the environmental nightmare in the former Soviet Union is that from today's vantage point, Chernobyl looks like a good thing. While in no way downplaying the death and destruction wrought by the April, 1986, nuclear catastrophe, Murray Feshbach and Alfred Friendly Jr. explain in "Ecocide in the U.S.S.R." that Chernobyl was only the first Soviet environmental disaster to become public knowledge.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Yevgeny I. Chazov, personal doctor to Kremlin leaders and co-winner of the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize for his work with an anti-nuclear organization, was dropped as Soviet health minister. Soviet health care is frequently attacked for its shortcomings.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | The Washington Post
The Soviet Union, bowing to extraordinary political pressure from its citizens, has decided to end underground nuclear explosions at its principal test site in South-Central Asia within three years and move a sharply reduced atomic testing program to a remote island within the Arctic circle, according to Soviet and U.S. sources.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
The Soviet Ministry of Health is an inconspicuous building in the heart of downtown Moscow, but excitement is palpable within its creaky corridors. The energy emanates largely from the corner office of Health Minister Yevgeny I. Chazov. From there, he is directing a colossal program to modernize this country's massive health care system, which has become antiquated, inefficient and bogged down in bureaucracy after years of under-funding and neglect.
NEWS
January 29, 1989
Nearly 3,000 Soviet children will be tested for AIDS because of the infection of at least 27 infants and four mothers while being treated at a Moscow-area hospital, the newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda said. Authorities suspect poor sanitary conditions and the possible reuse of disposable syringes.
NEWS
August 22, 1987 | From Reuters
The first Soviet clinic for impotent men is to open in Leningrad shortly, the weekly magazine supplement of the daily Izvestia reported Friday. Nedelya magazine said doctors and engineers assigned to the clinic had successfully tried a device on a number of men that could help thousands suffering from male sexual inadequacy. The device was not described.
NEWS
June 1, 1987 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
A leading Soviet scientist reported Sunday that "hundreds of thousands of people" have been screened for radiation sickness in the area around the site of last year's Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster. Soviet researchers are closely studying the data, which will form the basis of a report to the United Nations on the various ramifications of the explosion in the power station, the scientist said. The statement was made by Leonid A.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
International health experts concluded that radiation from the 1986 nuclear explosion at Chernobyl did not cause major health disorders in the areas of the Soviet Union near the accident. The International Atomic Energy Agency said that 200 independent international experts determined after four days of talks that reports of adverse health effects from radiation were unsubstantiated.
NEWS
June 22, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Thirteen babies who became infected with the AIDS virus in Soviet hospitals have spread the virus to their mothers in what appears to be the first reported cases of infant-to-mother transmission through breast-feeding. The cases, reported Thursday by Soviet researchers, are believed to represent a new, albeit rare, means of spreading the fatal virus. Experts in the field described the discovery as "interesting and disturbing" but said the phenomenon is unlikely to become widespread.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Anaheim division of a Minneapolis biomedical manufacturer will supply 20,000 blood oxygenators to hospitals in the Soviet Union under a contract that company officials valued at $6 million. Medtronic Cardiopulmonary, a 380-employee division of Medtronic Inc., manufactures the Maxima blood oxygenator, a disposable device used to perform the functions of the lungs during open-heart surgery. Winston R.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Soviet parliamentary delegation, decrying the secrecy their government imposed after the Chernobyl nuclear accident four years ago, made an urgent appeal to the United States and the world Friday for help in dealing with towering medical and other problems.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, beset with a dropping birthrate and infant mortality of Third World proportions in some locales, Tuesday adopted a sweeping emergency program championed by President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to aid couples who have babies and improve infant health care. The official Tass news agency said 6 million families would get more money from the government as a result.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1990 | From staff and wire reports
Drug company closures have severely cut the Soviet Union's already limited ability to produce medicines, according to a consultant specializing in Soviet affairs. "They are in a state of emergency because of supply cuts from plant closings, often for environmental concerns," said Dr. John Pendlebury, a partner with the consulting firm Coopers, Lybrand and Deloitte. Pendlebury said that between 30% and 40% of the Soviet Union's drug plants had closed over the past year.
NEWS
November 18, 1987 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Medical Writer
In a major challenge to the widely held belief that a "bad" form of cholesterol contributes to heart disease while another form helps to prevent it, U.S. and Soviet researchers have found that high levels of the supposedly "good" cholesterol offer no such protection to middle-aged Soviet men and are associated with an increase in the overall death rate.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Yevgeny I. Chazov, personal doctor to Kremlin leaders and co-winner of the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize for his work with an anti-nuclear organization, was dropped as Soviet health minister. Soviet health care is frequently attacked for its shortcomings.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | The Washington Post
The Soviet Union, bowing to extraordinary political pressure from its citizens, has decided to end underground nuclear explosions at its principal test site in South-Central Asia within three years and move a sharply reduced atomic testing program to a remote island within the Arctic circle, according to Soviet and U.S. sources.
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