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NEWS
February 29, 1988 | From Reuters
Josef Stalin's feared police chief, Lavrenti P. Beria, went on a hunger strike before his 1953 trial and begged on his knees for mercy before he was shot, a government newspaper reported over the weekend. Eyewitness accounts, published in the weekend supplement of Izvestia, provided dramatic details never before released of the fall of the man known as "the Kremlin Monster" and said that unlike many of Stalin's purge victims, he refused to plead guilty.
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NEWS
September 2, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexei Alexeyev gets a little wistful when he describes his youth, growing up in a town where a researcher was king and scientific achievement was the Soviet Union's proudest boast. "The atmosphere was unbelievable--there was no other place in the world that had such enthusiasm for scientific ideas," recalled Alexeyev, a 42-year-old mathematician-turned-entrepreneur.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last year, during the first free election in the Soviet Union since the Bolshevik Revolution, American TV producers were waiting in a Moscow hotel room for their consultant, Alexander (Sasha) Isaakovich Gelman, who was running for the Soviet Parliament. Finally, Gelman walked in and announced, "I've been elected. Let's get to work (on the script)." In July, President Mikhail Gorbachev nominated Gelman to the Central Committee of the Communist Party.
NEWS
August 30, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of the millions of people suppressed by Soviet power since 1917, dissident writer Lev Timofeyev was among the last. Taken from his home a few days after Mikhail S. Gorbachev assumed the helm of the Communist Party in 1985, the critic of Soviet economics was tried, convicted and eventually transported to the infamous Perm 36, a Ural Mountains labor colony for political prisoners. He traveled in a rail car that was packed so tightly he was infested with huge body lice by the time he arrived.
NEWS
October 7, 1988 | United Press International
The weekly Moscow News on Thursday printed a shocking description of mass executions conducted by Josef Stalin's secret police, describing how 100,000 Soviet citizens were systematically murdered in the southwestern Byelorussian republic before the 1941 Nazi invasion. Until now, Soviet historians have blamed the wholesale executions on German forces that occupied the area during World War II.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
V I. Lenin died of multiple brain hemorrhages on Jan. 21, 1924, in the town of Gorky. He was 53. Less than four months later, artist Liubov Sergeevna Popova died in Moscow of scarlet fever contracted from her young son who succumbed a few days earlier. She was just 35. Lenin and Popova probably never met but the connection is as intimate as that between an author and a character that inhabits his work.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1988 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, Associated Press
They are political prisoners, branded "enemies of the people" under Stalin. They have been banished to a ramshackle fishing village in the Soviet north, where they live alongside but apart from the villagers. Their names are Luzga and Kopalych, and they are the heroes of a new Soviet film that illustrates the country's confusion after the death of Joseph V. Stalin in March, 1953, and its continuing attempt to come to grips with his legacy.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | STEPHANIE GRACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You need to hang (hang without fail, so that the public sees) at least 100 notorious kulaks, the rich, and the bloodsuckers. "Publish their names. Take away all of their grain. Execute the hostages. "This needs to be accomplished in such a way, that people for hundreds of miles around will see, tremble, know and scream out: let's choke and strangle those blood-sucking kulaks." --Vladimir I. Lenin, 1918 The order by Russian Communist leader Vladimir I.
NEWS
September 4, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the dank tunnels beneath the KGB headquarters lie the moldering documents, perhaps ruined by seepage or soiled by rat droppings, that could explain to Vladimir Yanin why he was arrested at 16 as "the son of an enemy of the people" and why his stepfather was shot. At least, that is what Yanin dares to hope, now that the KGB files on the millions who fell victim to Josef Stalin's brutal dictatorship are about to be opened.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"Portrait of the Soviet Union" may be Ted Turner's crowning achievement in programming, a seven-hour documentary of panoramic sweep and rich, gleaming production values that narrows the gap between the United States and an old enemy. In many respects, unfortunately, it also projects a view through Red-colored glasses, one that maximizes Soviet strengths and minimizes Soviet weaknesses, one that disappoints even as it dazzles.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | From Associated Press
A retired American physicist long suspected of having spied for the Soviet Union in the 1940s has spoken out for the first time on his role in apparently helping the Soviets break an American monopoly on atomic weapons. In two written statements to the authors of a new book on his case, Theodore A. Hall explained his motive and intentions in contacting a Soviet agent in 1944 when he was a 19-year-old physicist at the Los Alamos, N.M.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | BETH KNOBEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's little doubt it will be one of the world's strangest theme parks, a place for Russians jostled by today's tough times to travel back through the decades to more stable, Communist days. It will be a place where they can hear a radio trumpeting the launch of Sputnik and other victories in the space race with the Americans. It will be a place where, for 22 kopecks, they will be able to swig a bottle of cold beer that today costs 100 times as much.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | STEPHANIE GRACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"You need to hang (hang without fail, so that the public sees) at least 100 notorious kulaks, the rich, and the bloodsuckers. "Publish their names. Take away all of their grain. Execute the hostages. "This needs to be accomplished in such a way, that people for hundreds of miles around will see, tremble, know and scream out: let's choke and strangle those blood-sucking kulaks." --Vladimir I. Lenin, 1918 The order by Russian Communist leader Vladimir I.
NEWS
March 11, 1992 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
It is a nightmare come true for old Stalinists and a dream come true for Western historians. The Hoover Institution, the conservative think tank at Stanford University that was considered a center of anti-Soviet scholarship, has obtained the rights to review and microfilm the previously secret archives of the Communist Party Central Committee and state ministries in the former Soviet Union, officials announced Tuesday.
NEWS
February 26, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Neatly typed and stapled into buff or red folders, they were chronicles of affairs of state that were just too important or dangerous for the average Russian to know. There was the 1980 Secretariat decision on the "impermissible" construction of drinking premises at state enterprises, for example. And one hot August day in 1986, Mikhail S.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one ever branded Herbert Hoover a Red-tinged fellow traveler. Yet in 1921, as secretary of commerce, he led an American relief drive to feed the people of the new Communist Soviet state. "Mr. Secretary," a woman protested, "aren't we going to help Bolshevism by feeding these people?" The future President banged his fist angrily on the table. "Twenty million people are starving," he said. "Whatever their politics, they shall be fed."
NEWS
February 27, 1988 | From Reuters
One of V.I. Lenin's last letters, in which he advised the removal of Josef Stalin, reached the future Soviet dictator by mistake, enabling him to secure his position, the Communist Party daily Pravda revealed on Friday. The letter to the 1924 Communist Party Congress, which party founder Lenin did not live to see, was published under former Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev in 1956. But Pravda revealed for the first time how Stalin discovered it.
NEWS
November 5, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Human rights activist Andrei D. Sakharov was quoted in a Soviet publication Wednesday as saying that "the whole terrible truth" about the Stalin era has not yet been told. Sakharov, a physicist who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1975, was interviewed by the Moscow News before Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev spoke out against Stalin on Monday in a speech on the 70th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution.
NEWS
December 30, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Never before has the end come so quickly. It began as the Russian Empire of the czars, who centuries ago proclaimed Muscovy as history's "Third Rome." It later became the Soviet Empire, heralded by Lenin and Stalin as the logical extension of history's vanguard. On Christmas Day, it simply ceased to exist. Historically, empires tend to linger for decades, sometimes centuries, past their prime. Consider the Romans, who were expelled from their capital by barbarian invaders in the year 410.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian leaders, alarmed that their nation has slipped so drastically behind the West, throw open the doors to foreign consultants. Sound familiar? Actually, the 1980s surge in East-West business ties is a footnote to a much larger--if little-known--story of how Americans helped build the modern Soviet Union before the Cold War, setting up steel mills, auto plants, machine factories, the very basis of its military-industrial might.
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