Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUssr Labor
IN THE NEWS

Ussr Labor

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 23, 1990 | JOHN CUNNIFF, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Radisson Hotel people are shipping in the furniture, computers and facsimile machines in preparation for the fall opening of the first American-managed hotel in the Soviet Union. The Radisson Slavjanskaya, a 430-room enterprise connected to a 165-suite business center, is a challenge like none other for Radisson, a unit of the $6.2-billion (annual revenue) Carlson Companies of Minneapolis.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 1,500 feet beneath the earth's surface, Nikolai Medvedev paused in his labor at the seam of glistening coal, and a sardonic smile flashed briefly in the dim light of his miner's helmet. "Things are not better than they were before," Medvedev said in answer to a reporter's question. "As you can see, I'm still working in this awful place, and there's no food at home. It's the same as always."
Advertisement
NEWS
March 12, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian populist leader Boris N. Yeltsin on Monday encouraged leaders of the 12-day-old coal miner strike in their demand for the resignation of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. Yeltsin, president of the Russian Federation, the country's largest republic, told strike leaders that they are fully justified in their attempts to push the Kremlin into meeting their largely political demands and that they have the right to pick the methods to be used to safeguard their interests.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't so long ago that central planners sent Soviet women out of the home and into the workplace. Now, the collapse of the centrally planned economy is singling women out for upheaval again, creating opportunities for the most enterprising but consigning vast numbers to unemployment as their nation's bloated state enterprises strain to grow more efficient. "The face of unemployment in the Soviet Union is a woman's face," said Igor E.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than 24 hours after the Soviet Communist Party voted to give up its "leading role" in the government and economy, the Baltic Shipping Co. in Leningrad on Thursday put the decision into immediate effect--and fired more than 200 political commissars on its ships.
NEWS
April 10, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet government, risking serious social unrest, is planning to let its low, state-controlled retail prices double and even triple in the coming 18 months as part of a program of radical economic reforms, well-informed economists said Monday. The plans call for only half of the price increases to be covered through a system that ties incomes to inflation, according to an outline of the government's reform package; any additional pay apparently will depend on greater worker productivity.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | Times Staff Writer
In a telling example of Soviet politics, perestroika- style, a shift foreman at a mine in the far north beat out the nation's coal minister to win election to the Russian Republic's Parliament. The Tass news agency said that Viktor Yakovlev, a worker at the Komsomolskaya mine in Vorkuta, received 501 more votes in Sunday's run-off balloting than Mikhail I. Shchadov, theoretically his boss as chief of the Coal Ministry in Moscow.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union's labor union organization, which for 70 years maintained the Communist Party's grip on the proletariat, voted Wednesday to dissolve itself, acknowledging that it was badly out of touch with the country's workers and unable to cope with the current economic crisis. President Mikhail S.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet government, seeking a popular mandate to transform the country's socialist economy into one based on market forces, announced plans Wednesday for an unprecedented national referendum on sweeping reforms that it acknowledges will double or triple many consumer prices and could put tens of millions of people out of work. Yuri D.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Nikolai I. Ryzhkov, outlining plans for the radical but gradual reform of the Soviet economy, said Thursday that the country will have to go through a severe recession marked by rising prices, serious unemployment and the bankruptcy of many enterprises as it corrects 70 years of mistaken policies.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
The movie is called "Lost in Siberia," possibly the first feature film to fly free and intact from the Soviet Union to the West following the revolution of 1991. It could very well have been titled "Lost Hope Found in Siberia . . . and All Over." But then it takes a special talent to write a movie title.
NEWS
August 10, 1991
Air controllers called off a walkout after reaching a last-minute agreement with the government. The Soviet Air Traffic Controllers' Trade Union said it reserves the right to resume strike plans if the government reneges on its promises. The walkout would have crippled Soviet air traffic. A union representing 57,000 pilots for Aeroflot, the national airline, had threatened to join the strike if its demands, similar to those of the controllers, were not met.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rumors of a layoff had spread around the sales floors of Sverdlovsk Central Department Store for weeks. But Svetlana V. Barysheva was confident she would not be a victim. "We were warned about the staff reductions but I didn't think my job was at risk," said Barysheva, who recently lost the only job she has ever had in the store's first big layoff. "When you're accustomed to working in the same place, it really throws you."
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | From Reuters
Soviet air traffic controllers called off a potentially damaging strike late Monday, and another body blow to the faltering economy was narrowly averted. Officials of the controllers' trade union said the government has agreed on an interim pay raise of 50% and further negotiations. The strike was suspended until Aug. 10. Further details were not available.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of delay, Mikhail S. Gorbachev launched his new "anti-crisis" program on Thursday with a presidential decree banning strikes in the Soviet Union's most crucial industries and offering plump incentives to their workers in an effort to shore up the collapsing economy at its base.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic victory for Russian Federation leader Boris N. Yeltsin, workers in the coal fields of western Siberia and above the Arctic Circle--some of the last holdouts in a two-month strike--decided Wednesday to return to their jobs. Leaders of strike committees in the coal-rich Kuznetsk basin of Siberia that Yeltsin visited last week voted overwhelmingly to suspend their strike as of Saturday.
NEWS
April 4, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet government offered Wednesday to double coal miners' salaries over the next year in a desperate attempt to bring an end to a month-old strike that has cost the country's decrepit economy millions of tons of coal, the official news agency Tass reported. But angry miners said the government's proposal, outlined by a conciliation commission, does not begin to meet their demands and declared that the government will have to offer far greater concessions to bring them back to work.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, bolstered by a run of political victories, declared on Friday that he is about to impose a strict new regime on key Soviet industries in response to public demand for "tough measures--right up to the very toughest measures."
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Kremlin on Monday signed over control of Russia's coal mines to the Russian Federation in an attempt to end a crippling two-month strike and agreed to give the largest Soviet republic its own state security agency. The two moves signaled a watershed for the Russian Federation's leader, Boris N. Yeltsin, who has been pressing Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to transfer to the republics authority over their own economic resources and political affairs.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Populist leader Boris N. Yeltsin launched his campaign for the powerful new Russian presidency Wednesday by reaching an agreement that could bring an end to the two-month coal miners' strike. Standing in front of a crowd of 5,000 workers in the Siberian city of Novokuznetsk, Yeltsin declared his solidarity with the miners and signed a resolution intended to transfer jurisdiction over coal mines to his Russian government.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|