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NEWS
April 28, 1989
A Soviet stage director's televised suggestion that V. I. Lenin's body be removed from the mausoleum on Red Square has caused a furor reaching into the Communist Party Central Committee. Lenin's mausoleum at the Kremlin Wall is visited by millions of Soviets every year, reflecting the reverence in which the Soviet founder still is held. Two candidate members of the Central Committee this week criticized Mark Zakharov, director of Moscow's Leninsky Komsomol Theater, for suggesting that Lenin's body be removed from the mausoleum, where it has been kept since his death in 1924, and buried.
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BUSINESS
November 10, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 100 years, workers at the Red October chocolate factory have strived to add a dollop of sweetness to the often bitter reality of life in the Soviet Union. And for most of the time they have done so as a state-owned enterprise, the largest candy manufacturer in all of Russia. But today, Red October is on the verge of a change as revolutionary as its name, which harks back to the Bolshevik takeover of the Soviet Union in the fall of 1917.
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NEWS
January 12, 1987 | From Reuters
The capital's Novodevichy cemetery, the most prestigious burial place in the Soviet Union after the Kremlin, will reopen its gates to the general public this year, the newspaper Trud reported over the weekend. Novodevichy was closed in the mid-1970s after crowds began flocking to a monument built at the grave of former Kremlin leader Nikita S. Khrushchev. Khrushchev, who was ousted from power in 1964 and died seven years later, is just one of numerous celebrated Russians buried at the cemetery.
NEWS
June 30, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yelena Yershova's glance shifted nervously from the 30 children in her charge to a steely-eyed policeman keeping watch over the silent procession to view V.I. Lenin's embalmed and enshrined body. "They should bury him," the nurse from provincial Istra remarked in a whisper, shielding her young sanatorium patients from an opinion that her fellow pilgrims might consider sacrilege. "He was a normal man," she said, reluctantly nudging along the ritual summer field trip.
NEWS
June 30, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yelena Yershova's glance shifted nervously from the 30 children in her charge to a steely-eyed policeman keeping watch over the silent procession to view V.I. Lenin's embalmed and enshrined body. "They should bury him," the nurse from provincial Istra remarked in a whisper, shielding her young sanatorium patients from an opinion that her fellow pilgrims might consider sacrilege. "He was a normal man," she said, reluctantly nudging along the ritual summer field trip.
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
During the planning of President Reagan's forthcoming summit trip to Moscow, White House aide Tom Griscom found himself standing with Soviet officials last March in a Moscow open-air pet market, packed shoulder to shoulder with people hawking "fish, dogs, chickens, cats, you name it." "It was almost a panic situation," added Jim Hooley, director of the presidential advance, who thought the experience most resembled "being in a disco fire." While the traveling team of a dozen top U.S.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 100 years, workers at the Red October chocolate factory have strived to add a dollop of sweetness to the often bitter reality of life in the Soviet Union. And for most of the time they have done so as a state-owned enterprise, the largest candy manufacturer in all of Russia. But today, Red October is on the verge of a change as revolutionary as its name, which harks back to the Bolshevik takeover of the Soviet Union in the fall of 1917.
NEWS
June 1, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
First Lady Nancy Reagan, viewing the opulence and splendor of czarist palaces on a whirlwind tour of Leningrad, declared Tuesday that now she understands why the Russian people rose up in revolution. Mrs. Reagan gazed wide-eyed at the displays of pre-Soviet wealth, including diamond-encrusted blankets for royal horses and the jewel-topped snuff boxes of Catherine the Great. She made it clear that she has no sympathy for the communist system.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 1988 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
Art professionals are greeting news of the Soviet Union's first international auction of modern and contemporary art, at Sotheby's July 7 sale in Moscow, as an important breakthrough in an untapped market. "It's a real coup for Sotheby's," said Stephanie Barron, curator of modern and contemporary art at the County Museum of Art. "This is the most exciting time for relations between the U.S. and U.S.S.R.
NEWS
April 28, 1989
A Soviet stage director's televised suggestion that V. I. Lenin's body be removed from the mausoleum on Red Square has caused a furor reaching into the Communist Party Central Committee. Lenin's mausoleum at the Kremlin Wall is visited by millions of Soviets every year, reflecting the reverence in which the Soviet founder still is held. Two candidate members of the Central Committee this week criticized Mark Zakharov, director of Moscow's Leninsky Komsomol Theater, for suggesting that Lenin's body be removed from the mausoleum, where it has been kept since his death in 1924, and buried.
NEWS
June 1, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
First Lady Nancy Reagan, viewing the opulence and splendor of czarist palaces on a whirlwind tour of Leningrad, declared Tuesday that now she understands why the Russian people rose up in revolution. Mrs. Reagan gazed wide-eyed at the displays of pre-Soviet wealth, including diamond-encrusted blankets for royal horses and the jewel-topped snuff boxes of Catherine the Great. She made it clear that she has no sympathy for the communist system.
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
During the planning of President Reagan's forthcoming summit trip to Moscow, White House aide Tom Griscom found himself standing with Soviet officials last March in a Moscow open-air pet market, packed shoulder to shoulder with people hawking "fish, dogs, chickens, cats, you name it." "It was almost a panic situation," added Jim Hooley, director of the presidential advance, who thought the experience most resembled "being in a disco fire." While the traveling team of a dozen top U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 1988 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
Art professionals are greeting news of the Soviet Union's first international auction of modern and contemporary art, at Sotheby's July 7 sale in Moscow, as an important breakthrough in an untapped market. "It's a real coup for Sotheby's," said Stephanie Barron, curator of modern and contemporary art at the County Museum of Art. "This is the most exciting time for relations between the U.S. and U.S.S.R.
NEWS
January 12, 1987 | From Reuters
The capital's Novodevichy cemetery, the most prestigious burial place in the Soviet Union after the Kremlin, will reopen its gates to the general public this year, the newspaper Trud reported over the weekend. Novodevichy was closed in the mid-1970s after crowds began flocking to a monument built at the grave of former Kremlin leader Nikita S. Khrushchev. Khrushchev, who was ousted from power in 1964 and died seven years later, is just one of numerous celebrated Russians buried at the cemetery.
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