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NEWS
May 4, 1989 | From Reuters
Soviet trade unions, long closely controlled by Communist authorities, will be given the right to strike under a draft law to be adopted in the next few months, union leader Stepan Shalayev said Wednesday. The draft law follows sporadic reports from across the country of wildcat strikes by miners, bus drivers and carpet weavers demanding better pay and conditions. Leningrad police officers demonstrated in the city center April 9 to back a series of demands, according to the newspaper Socialist Industry.
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NEWS
July 9, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 13% of the Soviet Union's state-owned enterprises are likely to go bankrupt in the next year as the country moves from a centrally planned to a free-market economy, lawmakers were told Monday as they gave preliminary approval to the country's first bankruptcy law. Vladimir I.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1991 | GREG GRANSDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Soviet pirate video market is one of the world's largest, with VCR ownership rising rapidly and copyright protection almost nonexistent. Igor Maltsev, deputy editor of Dom Kino, a film industry magazine published by the Cinematographers Union, estimates that there could be as many as 1 million VCRs in Moscow alone--suggesting that on average, one out of every nine residents owns a unit.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1991 | GREG GRANSDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A few hundred paces from the Oktyabr movie theater, where "Gone With the Wind" opened last fall to packed houses, stands a modest little kiosk that is souring the plans of U.S. film distributors to exploit the commercial potential of the vast Soviet entertainment market. Located on Arbat Street, the privately owned kiosk sells pirate videos of foreign, mainly American films. Of the list of 181 films on sale, at least 90% are U.S.
NEWS
March 19, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The Soviet Union and Yugoslavia pledged on Friday to respect the right of all Communist parties to choose their own paths, saying they have no intention of imposing their systems on anyone. Analysts said the declaration, in a joint statement at the end of a visit to Yugoslavia by Kremlin leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, formally invalidated the so-called Brezhnev Doctrine of limited sovereignty that justified Soviet intervention if Communist states deviated from the path mapped by the Kremlin.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The government newspaper Izvestia became the first Soviet publication to register under a new press law guaranteeing freedom from decades of state censorship. More than 120 newspapers and other Soviet news organizations have applied for registration. Under the new law, to establish a publication or news organization, Soviets need only provide their name, address, frequency of publication, circulation figures and source of financing.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Intercon Development Services, a computer software company in San Bernardino, thought it time to get on the Soviet-trade bandwagon and began negotiations on commercializing a Soviet private enterprise's technology in the West. But negotiations, begun last year, went in fits and starts as changing laws in the Soviet Union played havoc on the negotiating parties. The deal has yet to be signed and the Kremlin is talking about passing new joint venture laws.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and Soviet negotiators Thursday completed their work on a comprehensive trade accord designed to pave the way for a further normalization of trade relations with Moscow during President Bush's summit meeting May 30 with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. Thursday's announcement, which followed three days of closed-door talks in Paris, came despite calls by some members of Congress for Bush to postpone the negotiations until Moscow resolves its current tensions with Lithuania.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union's labor union organization, which for 70 years maintained the Communist Party's grip on the proletariat, voted Wednesday to dissolve itself, acknowledging that it was badly out of touch with the country's workers and unable to cope with the current economic crisis. President Mikhail S.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a non-confrontational but precedent-setting decision, the Constitutional Compliance Committee on Friday invalidated a decree issued by President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, demonstrating that the Soviet leader's actions are now subject to legal limits. "We are trying to affirm the sanctity of the constitution," the quasi-judicial panel's chairman, jurist Sergei S. Alexeyev, said as he made public the committee's first decision voiding a presidential act.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1991 | GREG GRANSDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Soviet pirate video market is one of the world's largest, with VCR ownership rising rapidly and copyright protection almost nonexistent. Igor Maltsev, deputy editor of Dom Kino, a film industry magazine published by the Cinematographers Union, estimates that there could be as many as 1 million VCRs in Moscow alone--suggesting that on average, one out of every nine residents owns a unit.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a landmark decision, Soviet lawmakers Monday approved a law giving virtually all citizens the right to travel abroad freely. The measure, meant to tear away what remains of the Iron Curtain, had been bogged down since late 1989, blocked largely by government fears of an uncontrollable outflow of emigrants and would-be migrant workers. Even now, its target date for full implementation is not until January, 1993.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of delay, Mikhail S. Gorbachev launched his new "anti-crisis" program on Thursday with a presidential decree banning strikes in the Soviet Union's most crucial industries and offering plump incentives to their workers in an effort to shore up the collapsing economy at its base.
NEWS
April 17, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As strikes spread across the Soviet Union, the national legislature Tuesday gave initial approval to a bill that would ban the political walkouts that are pushing the country further toward economic ruin. The action appeared unlikely to stem the seven-week-old coal miners' strike, which lawmakers had tried unsuccessfully to avert, nor is it likely to prevent other work stoppages that have been called in several major cities. President Mikhail S.
NEWS
March 26, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet government Monday banned all political demonstrations in Moscow until mid-April to prevent backers of Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin from holding a mass rally to support him in a showdown with Communist Party conservatives this week. A government order, requested by President Mikhail S.
NEWS
January 8, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Defense Ministry on Monday ordered army paratroopers, reportedly by the thousands, to track down and capture draft dodgers and deserters in restive areas of the country as President Mikhail S. Gorbachev again showed his firm determination to enforce Soviet laws nationwide. The Defense Ministry said the decision to employ squads of soldiers to dragoon youths into the military ranks had become necessary to ensure the country's ability to defend itself.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, increasingly concerned that his economic reforms will be undercut by the resistance of local officials, warned Monday that their refusal to respect federal law was making the country "uncontrollable" and that he would not put up with it any longer.
NEWS
June 27, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
A vast complex of new laws is being readied here as the Soviet Communist Party prepares to yield much of its direct authority to government bodies and economic enterprises in an extraordinary retreat from power. At a press conference Sunday, Deputy Justice Minister Mikhail P. Vyshinsky used these words to describe the undertaking: "A revolution is taking place here. Not everyone realizes this, but that is what it is--a revolution."
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As personal ads go, it was quite tame: "I'm 25, attractive and youthful and hope to meet a boyfriend (preferably a 30-year-old Muscovite) who still believes in love, loyalty and the beauty of human relations." But that it was signed "Andrei," and appeared in the Soviet Union's first gay newspaper, turned it into one more personal salvo in a new and still shaky assault on one of the harshest social taboos remaining in the era of glasnost , or openness.
NEWS
December 8, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vladimir I. Sorokoletov is a self-styled detective who tracks not missing persons but missing chicken legs and cans of sprats, and he claims to have solved the mystery of why there is so little food on the shelves of Soviet stores. He has seen what is in their basements.
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