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NEWS
July 4, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conservative die-hards and reformers went to war Tuesday for the hearts and minds of the Soviet Communist Party, with Yegor K. Ligachev denouncing the Gorbachev era's "reckless radicalism" and other leaders defending policies that stripped the "evil empire" label from their nation. One day after President Mikhail S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | staff writer John-Thor Dahlburg and Steven Gutterman, a researcher in The Times' Moscow bureau
From the farmlands of Russia to the seat of Kremlin power: Key dates in the life of the man who propelled his nation into the 1990s, then saw it disintegrate even as it abandoned him. 1931 March 2: Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev is born in Privolnoye in Stavropol region of southern Russia. 1945 As World War II ends, Gorbachev's father, Sergei, returns to Khleborob kolkhoz (collective farm) in Privolnoye to join his son, at 14 already working as combine driver.
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NEWS
November 30, 1990 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shopping for groceries lately, elderly residents here say, recalls the hungry days of World War II when hundreds of thousands of Leningraders starved to death as the Nazis blockaded the city. For the first time since rationing of food was suspended in 1947, Leningraders will have to produce coupons to buy food at state-subsidized prices starting Saturday. "I believe the situation is worse now than after the war," said Dalya V. Kudryavtsyeva, 65, a retired teacher.
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mikhail S. Gorbachev launched a "revolution without shots" that freed his people from repression and fear and brought the Cold War to a dramatic end, but he also whipped up economic and ethnic turmoil on such a vast scale that they doomed not just his leadership but his country. "I think I've done everything I could," the 60-year-old Soviet president wearily told a group of journalists he called to his Kremlin office this month for what seemed like a farewell news conference.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1991 | BILL BOYARSKY
As I watched the Soviet Union's Congress of Peoples Deputies on television last week, it confirmed my longstanding belief that legislative meetings are all the same. Don't misunderstand me. This isn't going to be a column whining about the years I've wasted sitting at the press table, taking notes gavel to gavel. I'll take a seat at press tables any day.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER and MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Boris N. Pankin, the new Soviet foreign minister, has seen the world turn full circle. As a brash Soviet journalist in his 40s, with a penchant for stories about police brutality, pollution and the number of abortions Soviet women must have because of the shortage of contraceptives, he fell afoul of the hard-line leadership group surrounding the late Soviet leader Leonid I. Brezhnev.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's economic reforms are encountering stiff conservative opposition, his chief economist said Wednesday, despite warnings that the Soviet Union has less than a year to pull out of the current crisis if the country is not to "topple into the abyss." Vice Prime Minister Leonid I.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Madison Avenue is already capitalizing on the collapsed coup. Stolichnaya Russian Vodka spent $200,000 to place full-page newspaper ads that celebrate the failure of the coup in today's editions of the Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Washington Post and Chicago Tribune. The ads feature a news photo of a massive demonstration in Leningrad's Palace Square in support of the constitutional government. "We're prouder than ever to be Russian," says the ad, which is signed "Stolichnaya Vodka."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, "Stalin's Funeral" would have been a sensation. Written and directed by Yevgeny Yevtushenko, the Soviet Union's best-known modern-day poet, the new film depicts life under Josef V. Stalin as a nightmare, which culminated in hundreds of deaths in the frenzied crowd outside the Moscow hall where the dictator's body lay in state in March, 1953.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big smiles lit up Estonian faces Monday evening as the news spread that the United States had recognized their tiny republic's independence, but any dancing in the streets, they said, will be reserved for the day that the Soviet Union acknowledges its sovereignty. "There is a very joyful mood in Estonia because we are closer than ever to becoming independent," said Tiina-Mari Nummert, an 18-year-old art student who was sketching a street scene in Tallinn's old town when she heard the news.
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the last president of the Soviet Union, resigned Wednesday night, stoutly defending his ultimately failed attempts at transforming his homeland and voicing alarm at what the future holds for it. "We are now living in a new world," Gorbachev said in a brief farewell address. It was a world the 60-year-old career Communist had an enormous role in creating, but one that finally held no place for the revitalized Soviet socialism that was his longtime ideal and goal.
NEWS
December 23, 1991 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev said in an interview broadcast Sunday that he has received tempting offers of lecture posts at universities in the United States, Japan and elsewhere but that he intends to retain a role in his country's political life. However, Gorbachev, who is expected to resign his now-titular presidency within days, did not rule out the possibility of combining foreign offers with the future work he expects to do at home.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the leaders of the Soviet Union's republics proclaimed the formation of the Commonwealth of Independent States on Saturday, they were really announcing the simultaneous--and troubled--births of a dozen new countries. Stretching across the Eurasian landmass, they remain bound together by an integrated economy, by a shared history, by their need for mutual security. But politically they differ, and increasingly so, in their struggle to emerge from the collapse of Soviet socialism.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a historic decision marking the rise of a new political order on the ruins of the old Soviet Union, eight former Soviet republics joined three others Saturday in a loose Commonwealth of Independent States. The agreement emphasizes the independence of each member state but lays a basis for a joint defense structure, including future control of Soviet nuclear weapons. Although Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
December 18, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS and CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, finally yielding in his battle to preserve the crumbling Soviet Union, declared Tuesday that he will accept the new Commonwealth of Independent States as its constitutional successor and said he is now working for an orderly transition. Gorbachev later agreed with Russian Federation President Boris N.
NEWS
December 13, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The question now being asked by all of Moscow is: when? The legislature was crammed Thursday afternoon as lawmakers, VIPs and hangers-on flocked to the Kremlin to watch what they thought was to be the final act of a political drama. It didn't happen then, but there is little doubt that it will. "Everything has a beginning and an end," Georgy K. Shakhnazarov, political adviser to Mikhail S.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, taking a calculated gamble, moved Wednesday to derail the political career of his nemesis, Boris N. Yeltsin, by accusing the maverick Communist of betraying socialism and advocating "the breakup of the Soviet Union" in his attempt to become leader of a more powerful Russia. In an episode of high Kremlin drama, the Soviet president took the floor for the first time at the Russian Congress of People's Deputies for an impassioned, occasionally angry, speech.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin held a virtual Kremlin summit meeting Wednesday to hammer out a common approach to the nation's economic problems and reached evident consensus on a sweeping devolution of powers to the republics.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Ukrainians voted overwhelmingly for independence from the Soviet Union, breaking with decades of failed socialism and centuries of Russian domination, the priority for their newborn nation-state will be to affirm many of the political, economic and security ties it now has with its neighbors, primarily with the Russian Federation. Ukrainian President-elect Leonid M.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 1,500 feet beneath the earth's surface, Nikolai Medvedev paused in his labor at the seam of glistening coal, and a sardonic smile flashed briefly in the dim light of his miner's helmet. "Things are not better than they were before," Medvedev said in answer to a reporter's question. "As you can see, I'm still working in this awful place, and there's no food at home. It's the same as always."
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