Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUssr Revolts
IN THE NEWS

Ussr Revolts

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | ANN IMSE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The sinister steel door in Lubyanka prison still has bars over the shoulder-high slot where KGB guards once spoke to political prisoners like Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg. But today it leads nowhere. It is sealed shut, and the famous prison inside the KGB's Lubyanka headquarters has been converted to a staff cafeteria and bookkeeping department. The KGB stopped interrogating prisoners there when dictator Josef Stalin died in 1953, the secret police agency said Friday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 12, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, not one of the men who plotted to overthrow Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev in the 1991 failed coup will be punished: On Thursday, Gen. Valentin I. Varennikov, the last of 12 defendants, was acquitted of treason by the Military Collegium of the Russian Supreme Court. That brought to a close a three-year trial that has degenerated from high political drama to disturbing farce.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 28, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a frantic effort to save its collapsing economy, the Soviet Union sold two-thirds of its gold reserves in the last year, spent all of its foreign currency holdings and went deeper into debt overseas, the government's chief economist said Friday. Grigory A. Yavlinsky, deputy chairman of the provisional committee managing the Soviet economy, said the Soviet Union, one of the world's major gold producers, now holds only 240 tons in gold reserves, worth about $2.7 billion.
NEWS
July 8, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Lies! Arrogant lies! Lies and slander!" When, at long last, former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev took the stand Thursday to set the record straight on the 1991 Kremlin coup attempt, his main message--publicly under oath for the first time--was a disgusted denial that he had collaborated with the plotters.
NEWS
May 4, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nikolai Ogorodnikov is a man without a country, and that suits him just fine. But it is creating a legal dilemma for the United States, which is unable to ship the convicted Soviet spy back home because his country no longer exists. Adding to the predicament, Ogorodnikov is risking a second criminal prosecution in the United States for refusing to ask any other country to accept him. A 1952 law says he must cooperate in his own deportation or face 10 years in prison.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirteen men accused in the plot to overthrow Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev were charged Wednesday with high treason, a crime that can carry a sentence of death by firing squad, as vigilante groups sprouted around the country to ferret out their accomplices. The Russian Federation prosecutor general made it clear that the net has been cast wider for the others involved.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With seven of the Soviet Union's 15 constituent republics now proclaiming independence, the rest of the world community has devised a whole new lexicon to describe its future relationship with the fledgling nations. According to U.S. officials, however, the only thing that really matters is whether full diplomatic recognition is extended. There is no important difference between the various terms that have been used to describe relationships short of full diplomatic recognition.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Messages flashing on the Macintosh computer screens at the offices of San Francisco/Moscow Teleport tell of tanks rumbling through Moscow and crowds massed in the streets shouting support for Boris Yeltsin and other opponents of the right-wing coup. "We are ready to give the hunta (sic) an airplane so they would fly away from our country," one politician is quoted as telling the gathering.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For retired Adm. William J. Crowe Jr., former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, news of the suicide of Soviet Marshal Sergei F. Akhromeyev carried a special sadness. Crowe, living in retirement in suburban Virginia, recalled Sunday how he and Akhromeyev had developed an unusual friendship that began with the Soviet officer's first visit to the United States four years ago for the signing of a treaty eliminating U.S. and Soviet medium-range nuclear missiles.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | Reuters
A trick telephone call helped track down Boris K. Pugo, the interior minister who killed himself rather than face arrest for his part in this week's coup attempt, an adviser to Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin said Friday. "It was like something out of Hitchcock," Grigory A. Yavlinsky, an internationally known radical economist, said in an interview. Yavlinsky said the head of the Russian KGB, Viktor Ivanenko, invited him to witness Pugo's arrest early Thursday.
NEWS
July 6, 1993
What promises to be the longest-running show in Moscow reopens Wednesday: the trial of 12 men accused of state treason for engineering the hard-line Soviet coup attempt of August, 1991. The trial, which opened in mid-April, has recessed repeatedly, first because one of the aging defendants fell ill and later because the court accepted defendants' attempts to discredit the prosecution.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | Associated Press
Russia's Supreme Court indefinitely suspended the trial of the alleged ringleaders of the August, 1991, coup Friday because one of the 12 defendants is ill. The die-hard Communists who briefly seized power from Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev argued that the trial could not continue without Alexander I. Tizyakov, 67, who was rushed from the courtroom with heart trouble on Wednesday, the opening day of the trial. The presiding judge, Maj. Gen.
NEWS
April 14, 1993 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a last-minute attempt to divert attention from themselves, key figures in the August, 1991, Soviet coup, who are scheduled to go on trail for treason today, are spreading the word that they will accuse then-Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev of encouraging their plot. After long months in prison awaiting trial, the 12 coup leaders remain steadfastly unrepentant. They say Gorbachev had the power to stop their coup but failed to do so.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soon to go on trial for their lives, many of the 12 aging Soviet Communists who tried to wrest control of the Kremlin are making no secret of their determination to turn the case into the bruising inquisition of a former comrade: Mikhail S. Gorbachev. "Gorbachev was a traitor," charged former Vice President Gennady I. Yanayev, a baggy-eyed heavy drinker whose hands visibly quaked when he announced Aug. 19, 1991, that he was assuming the Soviet president's duties.
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin, recalling the fateful hours of the coup attempt that rocked the world exactly one year ago, assured his fellow Russians on Wednesday that the country need no longer fear upheaval and civil war that could lead to nuclear disaster. "Civic peace is the most valuable thing there is in Russia today," Yeltsin told a nationwide television audience. "We have chosen the path of reform and not the path of revolutionary cataclysms." Acting Prime Minister Yegor T.
NEWS
August 18, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just a year after the coup attempt that led to his empire's demise, former Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev proposed Monday that the old Soviet republics come together again to re-create at least part of their old union. "It has become obvious now that the disintegration of the union was the main reason for the dire situation in which all the former Soviet republics have found themselves, including Russia," Gorbachev told reporters.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1991 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When producer Mark Carliner gazed from his Moscow hotel room two weeks ago and saw tank units controlled by the Soviet coup leaders streaming into the city, it seemed his dreams were crumbling. For two years Carliner had been trying to get the green light for a three-hour miniseries based on the life of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration, trying to keep up with the American mood of euphoria over the courage of the Soviet people, offered the first hint Sunday that it might ease its tough stand on economic assistance to the Soviet Union. Secretary of State James A. Baker III said the United States and its Western allies would require no more than a firm commitment toward reform before considering an aid package. In the past, many U.S.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One year after risking his life for Russia's freedom, Alexander I. Nezhny, a strapping, brooding epitome of the Muscovite intellectual with a gift for the chisel-sharp, incisive phrase, has every right to be disillusioned. In mid-August, 1991, Nezhny, a free-lance writer on religious affairs, broke off an interview with an Orthodox priest in Kiev, Ukraine, scrounged a train ticket and returned in haste to Moscow.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One is penning verse behind bars. Another shot himself to death to avoid the shame of capture. A third is back at work on his farm but had to promise not to engage in politics. One year after they tried to usurp Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's powers and take control of a superpower, members of the short-lived State Emergency Committee and their accomplices have no idea when--or even if--they will stand trial. Valentin G.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|