Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUssr Schools
IN THE NEWS

Ussr Schools

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as the United States is launching a war on scientific illiteracy, the Soviet Union is also trying to reform science and math education--but in almost exactly the opposite direction. At a meeting Friday at Cal State Long Beach, a leader of the Soviet reform movement told U.S. educators that the Soviet system fails to educate the best and brightest science and math students. Unlike the U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Branislava S. Fridman has been teaching history to Moscow schoolchildren for 41 years, but these days she has to spend three hours a night preparing her lessons. That's because much of what she used to teach now looks more like fiction than history. And Fridman, along with so many other teachers, is searching for the truth.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 1, 1989
History examinations for Soviet students, canceled last year, will be given again this year--but with a twist, a Soviet newspaper said. Teachers will now be able to devise their own exams, and students will be permitted to disagree with their teachers and textbooks without receiving lower grades, according to Uchitelskaya Gazeta, the national teacher's newspaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1991 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
Changes proposed this week by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to move the Soviet Union away from Marxism have already begun in three schools, said a former Soviet minister of education who visited with high-tech firms and universities this week. The change is occurring as schools adopt different philosophies and as professors who refuse to accept new ideologies retire, said Ivan F. Obraztsov, who served as the top education official in the Soviet government for 17 years.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
In what could prove to be a major business coup, a small Irvine company has been picked to supply personal computers to schools in the Soviet Union and assist the Soviets in establishing their own PC industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1989 | MARK LANDSBAUM, Times Staff Writer
Fifth- and sixth-grade Irvine students will soon be using computers to talk to their counterparts in two Moscow elementary schools, comparing notes on their favorite music and exchanging scientific research on such worldly concerns as acid rain. In what officials have entitled the Global Common Classroom, a unique project nurtured by UC Irvine Prof. John M. Whiteley, students at three Irvine campuses will be speaking electronically to youngsters in the Soviet Union as early as March.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1991 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
Changes proposed this week by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to move the Soviet Union away from Marxism have already begun in three schools, said a former Soviet minister of education who visited with high-tech firms and universities this week. The change is occurring as schools adopt different philosophies and as professors who refuse to accept new ideologies retire, said Ivan F. Obraztsov, who served as the top education official in the Soviet government for 17 years.
NEWS
February 23, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
When Shimon Yusim began studying Hebrew clandestinely a year ago with a group of friends in a Moscow apartment, he knew he was taking a chance. Helin Lipskerov knew that she, too, was treading on dangerous ground when she bought a Torah five years ago on the black market.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Branislava S. Fridman has been teaching history to Moscow schoolchildren for 41 years, but these days she has to spend three hours a night preparing her lessons. That's because much of what she used to teach now looks more like fiction than history. And Fridman, along with so many other teachers, is searching for the truth.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | United Press International
Soviet churches won the right Monday to establish their own schools and engage in charity work in the final passage of a broad-based religious bill ending seven decades of state atheism. But members of the Supreme Soviet, in separate votes, rejected proposals to allow religious services in the military and to permit state classrooms to be used for religious instruction after normal school hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as the United States is launching a war on scientific illiteracy, the Soviet Union is also trying to reform science and math education--but in almost exactly the opposite direction. At a meeting Friday at Cal State Long Beach, a leader of the Soviet reform movement told U.S. educators that the Soviet system fails to educate the best and brightest science and math students. Unlike the U.S.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | United Press International
Soviet churches won the right Monday to establish their own schools and engage in charity work in the final passage of a broad-based religious bill ending seven decades of state atheism. But members of the Supreme Soviet, in separate votes, rejected proposals to allow religious services in the military and to permit state classrooms to be used for religious instruction after normal school hours.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today Vyacheslav N. Shostakovsky will stride down the freshly waxed corridor to his second-floor office one final time, sign a paper authorizing its use by a new occupant and find himself no longer in the employ of the Soviet Communist Party.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | MASHA HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the old turntable played a pre-revolutionary Russian folk song at Preschool No. 804, 5-year-old Natasha was doing something that once would have been strictly forbidden in a Soviet classroom. She wasn't dancing. Because she felt shy, Natasha was allowed to watch quietly as her classmates spun and twirled.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
In what could prove to be a major business coup, a small Irvine company has been picked to supply personal computers to schools in the Soviet Union and assist the Soviets in establishing their own PC industry.
NEWS
February 23, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
When Shimon Yusim began studying Hebrew clandestinely a year ago with a group of friends in a Moscow apartment, he knew he was taking a chance. Helin Lipskerov knew that she, too, was treading on dangerous ground when she bought a Torah five years ago on the black market.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | MASHA HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the old turntable played a pre-revolutionary Russian folk song at Preschool No. 804, 5-year-old Natasha was doing something that once would have been strictly forbidden in a Soviet classroom. She wasn't dancing. Because she felt shy, Natasha was allowed to watch quietly as her classmates spun and twirled.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today Vyacheslav N. Shostakovsky will stride down the freshly waxed corridor to his second-floor office one final time, sign a paper authorizing its use by a new occupant and find himself no longer in the employ of the Soviet Communist Party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1989 | MARK LANDSBAUM, Times Staff Writer
Fifth- and sixth-grade Irvine students will soon be using computers to talk to their counterparts in two Moscow elementary schools, comparing notes on their favorite music and exchanging scientific research on such worldly concerns as acid rain. In what officials have entitled the Global Common Classroom, a unique project nurtured by UC Irvine Prof. John M. Whiteley, students at three Irvine campuses will be speaking electronically to youngsters in the Soviet Union as early as March.
NEWS
February 1, 1989
History examinations for Soviet students, canceled last year, will be given again this year--but with a twist, a Soviet newspaper said. Teachers will now be able to devise their own exams, and students will be permitted to disagree with their teachers and textbooks without receiving lower grades, according to Uchitelskaya Gazeta, the national teacher's newspaper.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|