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NEWS
March 28, 1990 | NIKKI FINKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Are you two crazy ?" asked the nonplussed Moscow journalist. That simple question summed up world reaction to the Feb. 9 marriage between a granddaughter of a Cold War President and a top Soviet space scientist who advises Kremlin leaders. Five weeks after the ceremony, sitting in the suburban Washington, D.C., office they share, newlyweds Susan Eisenhower and Roald Sagdeyev can recall that interview and laugh out loud.
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NEWS
December 20, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State James A. Baker III agreed Thursday that Russia should retain part of the massive Soviet nuclear arsenal, even though most of the missiles are aimed at the United States and its allies, because a nuclear-free Russia would upset the concept of deterrence that has kept the peace for the last four decades.
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NEWS
April 30, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East Germany proposed Sunday that a united Germany become a member of NATO if the Western alliance changes its "strategy and structures," transforming itself into a political and economic alliance rather than a military grouping confronting the Soviet Union. Prime Minister Lothar de Maiziere, completing a day of talks with President Mikhail S.
NEWS
December 6, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush promised Thursday to use U.S. influence to keep the peace and discourage conflict in the Soviet Union as it plunges through the dizzying process of disintegration. But he acknowledged that "nobody can predict with any degree of accuracy where it's all going to be the day after tomorrow."
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the KGB, the Soviet security and intelligence service, sought on Tuesday to soften the impact of his recent tough speeches with a renewed commitment to political reforms at home and improved relations with the West. Vladimir A.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the KGB, the Soviet Union's security service, have accused the country's leadership of acting too slowly to deal with its multiple crises and declared that they will act without hesitation to protect the socialist system here if they see it threatened by the growing political turmoil. In extraordinary public appeal to President Mikhail S.
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, faced with growing demands for independence in its three Baltic republics, is asking the United States and other Western countries to discourage their secession as a threat to European stability and broader East-West relations, according to senior Soviet officials and Western diplomats.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No sooner had 10 of the Soviet Union's 15 republics declared their independence than most were working Monday to establish another union binding themselves together again. Hard realities, political as well as economic, made a loosely structured confederation more attractive for most than complete, go-it-alone independence. And what Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | Associated Press
Kremlin officials beefed up security at airports and power plants in the republics of Azerbaijan and Armenia on Saturday and scrambled to aid an estimated 150,000 refugees who have fled their homes in fear of ethnic violence, Soviet media reported. The Moscow leadership also ripped into the Communist Party and government leaders of the rival republics for failing to halt the wave of communal rioting that has killed at least 28 people.
NEWS
March 4, 1988 | From Reuters
Local militia and civilian volunteers are patrolling the streets of a second Azerbaijani city after unrest spread there following ethnic riots in Sumgait, a local Communist Party official said Thursday. The party official--in Kirovabad, a city of 200,000 near the border with Soviet Armenia--said "small groups of hooligan youths" demonstrated Monday, the day after riots in the Caspian Sea port of Sumgait, 165 miles to the east.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Soviet expert on nuclear targeting told U.S. lawmakers Tuesday that elaborate safeguards on Soviet weapons ensured that leaders of the failed August coup could not have fired intercontinental strategic missiles at the United States even if they had wanted to. But the Soviet Union's 15,000 smaller, tactical nuclear weapons, which are designed for battlefield use, are subject to fewer controls, said Gennady A. Pavlov.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No sooner had 10 of the Soviet Union's 15 republics declared their independence than most were working Monday to establish another union binding themselves together again. Hard realities, political as well as economic, made a loosely structured confederation more attractive for most than complete, go-it-alone independence. And what Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were such stuff as nightmares were made on, the stewards of centuries of fear. Four hundred twenty years ago, Ivan the Terrible sent his Oprichniki, clad in black and riding coal-dark horses, to massacre the citizens of the restive city of Novgorod. Three hundred years later, the Oprichnina's successors, the Okhrana, fomented anti-Jewish pogroms, spied on Russian emigres in Paris and helped send about 290,000 of the czar's subjects to misery and death in Siberia.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a fit of pre-summit overzealousness, Soviet KGB guards Monday blocked the White House chef as he tried to enter the palatial U.S. ambassador's residence to chop vegetables. After several minutes of chatter on walkie-talkies and loud protests from four U.S. Navy stewards, who accompanied the chef and who said that chickens in the ambassador's kitchen were in danger of burning, the KGB honcho on the scene cleared the staff of the White House mess to pass.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev warned Tuesday that the continuing crisis in Yugoslavia, with the threat of a civil war there, poses a serious danger to surrounding countries, including the Soviet Union, and to the stability of the European Continent. Gorbachev, concluding two days of talks here with Spanish Prime Minister Felipe Gonzalez, told a press conference that many of the fundamental principles of European security and the "new world order" are at stake in the Yugoslav conflict.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet lawmakers Tuesday approved draft legislation that, for the first time, will regulate the activities of the KGB, the country's security and intelligence agency, and protect the rights of those it investigates. Vladimir A.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet security forces battled throughout Wednesday against rioting mobs in the Central Asian city of Dushanbe in an effort to restore order there and end the country's latest, and some of its fiercest, anti-government violence.
NEWS
June 1, 1987 | From Reuters
Mathias Rust, the lanky, teen-aged loner who landed a rented plane in Moscow's Red Square last week, has been hailed as a hero in West Germany. Newspapers thrilled over the daredevil flight of "Rusty the Kremlin pilot," and one poll claimed he had captured the hearts of 88% of the people. Reporters have been sent to see the double-bunk bed in the room he shared with his brother, counted the parakeets in the family home near Hamburg and interviewed the girls who never dated the shy 19-year-old.
NEWS
February 24, 1991
The ground war in the Gulf has RAISED FEARS AMONG SOME SOVIET OFFICIALS of a pro-Iraq backlash by Muslims in the Soviet Union. One Soviet Mideast analyst said President Mikhail S. Gorbachev undertook his peace initiative "partly to pacify the Muslim population." There are an estimated 80 million Muslims among the nation's 283 million people, and the Kremlin has weathered two years of secessionist and ethnic unrest in its southern Islamic regions.
NEWS
February 1, 1991
An opinion POLL published by the independent news agency Interfax showed 63% of Soviets support the allies and 8% support Iraq. The remaining 29% were undecided. More than 2,000 people were questioned in 30 towns and 17 villages, it said. A senior Soviet officer told the Defense Ministry's newspaper that the MILITARY fears the Gulf War could spill over onto Soviet territory.
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