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October 30, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of litigation between a Palo Alto businessman and the Soviet Union, a settlement was reached on the American's lawsuit charging Moscow with libel for accusing him of being a spy and breach of contract, it was announced Monday. "I'm satisfied," the businessman, Raphael Gregorian, 61, said in a telephone interview. "It was a mutual decision." Gregorian's Los Angeles attorney, Gerald L. Kroll, said Soviet negotiators admitted to "a misunderstanding" in accusing his client of spying.
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NEWS
October 30, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of litigation between a Palo Alto businessman and the Soviet Union, a settlement was reached on the American's lawsuit charging Moscow with libel for accusing him of being a spy and breach of contract, it was announced Monday. "I'm satisfied," the businessman, Raphael Gregorian, 61, said in a telephone interview. "It was a mutual decision." Gregorian's Los Angeles attorney, Gerald L. Kroll, said Soviet negotiators admitted to "a misunderstanding" in accusing his client of spying.
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NEWS
April 7, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge overturned on Monday an unprecedented $250,000 libel award against the Soviet newspaper Izvestia, concluding that U.S. citizens are barred under federal law from bringing libel suits against foreign governments. U.S. District Judge David V.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet citizens won the right Thursday, for the first time, to sue government agencies to seek redress of their grievances. The Supreme Soviet, the national legislature, enacted the law as part of a sweeping reform of the Soviet legal system. The law will permit people to bring complaints against state organizations into independent courts for a hearing and judgment. Artem M.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet citizens won the right Thursday, for the first time, to sue government agencies to seek redress of their grievances. The Supreme Soviet, the national legislature, enacted the law as part of a sweeping reform of the Soviet legal system. The law will permit people to bring complaints against state organizations into independent courts for a hearing and judgment. Artem M.
NEWS
April 7, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge overturned on Monday an unprecedented $250,000 libel award against the Soviet newspaper Izvestia, concluding that U.S. citizens are barred under federal law from bringing libel suits against foreign governments. U.S. District Judge David V.
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