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Ussr Territories And Possessions

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NEWS
September 28, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a frantic effort to save its collapsing economy, the Soviet Union sold two-thirds of its gold reserves in the last year, spent all of its foreign currency holdings and went deeper into debt overseas, the government's chief economist said Friday. Grigory A. Yavlinsky, deputy chairman of the provisional committee managing the Soviet economy, said the Soviet Union, one of the world's major gold producers, now holds only 240 tons in gold reserves, worth about $2.7 billion.
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NEWS
May 22, 1993 | Associated Press
Russian Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin said Friday that some former Soviet republics are interested in becoming part of Russia, the Interfax news agency reported. The agency also quoted Deputy Prime Minister Alexander N. Shokhin as saying that one of those states was Tajikistan, which he said made inquiries about six months ago during its bloody civil war. The Central Asian nation is among the poorest former Soviet republics.
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NEWS
August 29, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirteen men accused in the plot to overthrow Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev were charged Wednesday with high treason, a crime that can carry a sentence of death by firing squad, as vigilante groups sprouted around the country to ferret out their accomplices. The Russian Federation prosecutor general made it clear that the net has been cast wider for the others involved.
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving swiftly to embrace the beginning of a new era in Russia and its neighboring republics, President Bush declared Wednesday that the Soviet Union has passed into history and announced that the United States is according full recognition to the Russian Federation and five other former Soviet republics. "The Soviet Union itself is no more," Bush declared in a seven-minute-long, nationally televised address, only hours after Mikhail S. Gorbachev's resignation as Soviet president.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With seven of the Soviet Union's 15 constituent republics now proclaiming independence, the rest of the world community has devised a whole new lexicon to describe its future relationship with the fledgling nations. According to U.S. officials, however, the only thing that really matters is whether full diplomatic recognition is extended. There is no important difference between the various terms that have been used to describe relationships short of full diplomatic recognition.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
As the Iron Curtain collapses in Eastern Europe, the Ice Curtain is rapidly melting in the Bering Strait separating Alaska and the Soviet Far East. Slammed shut by Stalin in 1948, the back door to the Soviet Union--through Siberia and into the United States through Alaska--is opening in a dramatic fashion. Until recently the mysterious Soviet Far East, one of the most isolated and least-known places on Earth, had been off limits to all foreigners.
NEWS
December 9, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and the leaders of Ukraine and Belarus on Sunday declared the Soviet Union dead and established a new "commonwealth of independent states" with the capital in Minsk, capital of Belarus, rather than Moscow. "We, the Republic of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine, as the founding states of the U.S.S.R. and co-signatories of the 1922 Union Treaty . . . state that the U.S.S.R.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A foreign visitor to this city in the western Ukraine recently tried to make an overseas telephone call, a request the hotel operator rejected as impossible. The visitor then approached the hotel manager, who said she too was powerless to help. "I'm just a government official," the manager said. "You'd better ask Rukh." Rukh--the word means "the movement" in Ukrainian--has remarkable influence in the Soviet Union's second-largest republic despite being legalized less than a month ago.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS and ESTHER SCHRADER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Communist Party in the Soviet Baltic republic of Estonia, following the lead of neighboring Lithuania, voted Sunday to break with the Soviet Communist Party and work for the state's full independence. The Estonian Communists voted 432 to 3 to proclaim their independence from the Soviet party at a special congress in Tallinn, the republic's capital, but party officials said that more than 230 delegates, most of them Russians, did not take part in the vote.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearful that the Kremlin is regressing to the Stalinist excesses that enslaved them for decades, East European governments on Monday denounced the Soviet crackdown in Lithuania that killed more than a dozen unarmed civilians. "We cannot accept the military action in Lithuania. We condemn and deplore it," Hungarian Prime Minister Jozsef Antall told a special session of Parliament convened to discuss the Soviet crisis.
NEWS
December 24, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush plans to announce Thursday that the United States will recognize the independence of all 12 former Soviet republics and immediately establish formal diplomatic relations with six of them, Administration officials said Monday.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the leaders of the Soviet Union's republics proclaimed the formation of the Commonwealth of Independent States on Saturday, they were really announcing the simultaneous--and troubled--births of a dozen new countries. Stretching across the Eurasian landmass, they remain bound together by an integrated economy, by a shared history, by their need for mutual security. But politically they differ, and increasingly so, in their struggle to emerge from the collapse of Soviet socialism.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration seemed relieved Saturday that 11 republics of the former Soviet Union were able to hammer together a new commonwealth agreement even though some details--including the way a crucial joint military command will work--were left hanging. President Nursultan Nazarbayev of Kazakhstan contacted Secretary of State James A.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of a key summit meeting of leaders from 11 old Soviet republics, Ukraine stressed Friday that it will not permit the emerging Commonwealth of Independent States to become a reincarnation of the crumbling Soviet Union. In a statement heralding discord that may plague today's talks in Alma-Ata, Kazakhstan, Ukrainian lawmakers voiced resounding opposition to "the transformation of the commonwealth . . . into a state creation with its own organs of government and administration."
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here are answers to some of the questions asked most often about the old Soviet Union: Question. Has the Soviet Union ceased to exist? Answer. The Soviet Union still exists but is disintegrating so quickly that it is now just a matter of days. Of the 15 republics that made up the Soviet Union at the start of the year, all have now declared their independence save Russia. Q. What is replacing it? A.
NEWS
December 21, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So, what do you call it anyway? As Secretary of State James A. Baker III whipped through five republics of the disintegrating Soviet Union this week, one of the most irksome problems was deciding how to refer to the country. Naming the pieces is easy. Russia is Russia; Ukraine is Ukraine. But what about the whole? Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin likes Commonwealth of Independent States. But officials of the collapsing central government still favor the Soviet Union label.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration, trying to keep up with the American mood of euphoria over the courage of the Soviet people, offered the first hint Sunday that it might ease its tough stand on economic assistance to the Soviet Union. Secretary of State James A. Baker III said the United States and its Western allies would require no more than a firm commitment toward reform before considering an aid package. In the past, many U.S.
SPORTS
September 14, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The newly independent Baltic republics of Latvia and Estonia on Friday rejected an invitation to join a Soviet team for next year's Olympics, a Soviet wire service reported. Ulyana Semyonova, vice president of Latvia's Olympic Committee, said the republic would "by no means" accept an appeal from Soviet sports officials to form a united team for the Albertville and Barcelona Games. "We have become a separate state and we have nothing to do with the U.S.S.R.
NEWS
December 20, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Secretary of State James A. Baker III agreed Thursday that Russia should retain part of the massive Soviet nuclear arsenal, even though most of the missiles are aimed at the United States and its allies, because a nuclear-free Russia would upset the concept of deterrence that has kept the peace for the last four decades.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration's call for an international conference on aiding the Commonwealth of Independent States--the supposed centerpiece of a more dynamic American approach to the crumbling Soviet Union--has failed to catch fire and could become a minor embarrassment, U.S. officials and foreign diplomats said Wednesday. Many of the allied governments that will be asked to attend have been polite but unenthusiastic. A few have been openly critical.
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