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Ussr Trade Eastern Europe

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NEWS
February 10, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven weeks after Romania became the last domino of the East Bloc Communist alliance to fall, the Soviet Union is cautiously setting about the tough job of defining a new relationship with its East European neighbors. It is a job admittedly complicated by what one strategist calls the "inevitable" feelings of alienation in proud countries coerced by the Kremlin for two generations, and also by the uncertainties of German reunification.
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NEWS
July 27, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moscow has tightened the taps on its much-touted "Friendship Pipeline," cutting oil deliveries to Eastern Europe and inflicting new strains on its troubled relations with erstwhile allies. The abrupt reductions depriving former Soviet satellites of as much as one-third of their regular fuel supplies have boosted both energy prices and anti-Soviet sentiment.
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NEWS
July 27, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moscow has tightened the taps on its much-touted "Friendship Pipeline," cutting oil deliveries to Eastern Europe and inflicting new strains on its troubled relations with erstwhile allies. The abrupt reductions depriving former Soviet satellites of as much as one-third of their regular fuel supplies have boosted both energy prices and anti-Soviet sentiment.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven weeks after Romania became the last domino of the East Bloc Communist alliance to fall, the Soviet Union is cautiously setting about the tough job of defining a new relationship with its East European neighbors. It is a job admittedly complicated by what one strategist calls the "inevitable" feelings of alienation in proud countries coerced by the Kremlin for two generations, and also by the uncertainties of German reunification.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stunning political and economic changes now sweeping Eastern Europe may be about to claim their first institutional casualty: the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, the Eastern countries' common market. The 10-member council, known as Comecon, has been in trouble for several years as East European countries chafed under trading terms with the Soviet Union that too often left them the losers. Hungary and Poland long have been pressing for reforms.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stunning political and economic changes now sweeping Eastern Europe may be about to claim their first institutional casualty: the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, the Eastern countries' common market. The 10-member council, known as Comecon, has been in trouble for several years as East European countries chafed under trading terms with the Soviet Union that too often left them the losers. Hungary and Poland long have been pressing for reforms.
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