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Ussr Trade Vietnam

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NEWS
June 10, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trinh Ngoc Bao has an enormous headache. As deputy director of Hanoi's Chien Thang Sewing Factory, Bao has been struggling to keep the state-owned firm afloat under economic reforms requiring that he turn a profit or go bankrupt. Bao has slowly built up a small clientele in Sweden, South Korea and Japan that pays in hard currency. Last year, he built a new executive office complex with the profits.
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NEWS
June 10, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trinh Ngoc Bao has an enormous headache. As deputy director of Hanoi's Chien Thang Sewing Factory, Bao has been struggling to keep the state-owned firm afloat under economic reforms requiring that he turn a profit or go bankrupt. Bao has slowly built up a small clientele in Sweden, South Korea and Japan that pays in hard currency. Last year, he built a new executive office complex with the profits.
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BUSINESS
May 20, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The white-washed house on a back street of Hanoi is a world apart from Silicon Valley. But its occupants have much in common with their counterparts in Northern California. On the upper floors of the restored mansion, a dozen computers are crammed together on desktops. Vietnamese programmers are poring over details of software in development. The only noise is the soft clicking of computer mice used to shuttle blinking dots around their screens.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The white-washed house on a back street of Hanoi is a world apart from Silicon Valley. But its occupants have much in common with their counterparts in Northern California. On the upper floors of the restored mansion, a dozen computers are crammed together on desktops. Vietnamese programmers are poring over details of software in development. The only noise is the soft clicking of computer mice used to shuttle blinking dots around their screens.
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