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NEWS
July 25, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it starts to rain in the Soviet capital, it is as though a referee has called time out in the game of one-upmanship played along the Ring Road that circles the Kremlin. Whether at the wheel of a lowly subcompact Zaparozhets or a chauffeured, black Volga shuttling the Communist elite, drivers promptly brake to a stop, jump out and install their windshield wipers.
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NEWS
December 19, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to have a Soviet military plane land here today bearing Russia's entry in the America's Cup sailing regatta were grounded Wednesday, along with an ambitious proposal to reload the plane with food and supplies for the return trip--victims of the country's internal turmoil. "It's loaded with a yacht, ready to come, but at this point there are lots of glitches," said Neil Frame, executive director of Los Angeles-based Operation U.S.A.
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BUSINESS
April 27, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Madison Avenue jumped on the glasnost bus in more ways then one Thursday. An American firm that sells advertising space on buses from Los Angeles to New York signed a multimillion-dollar licensing agreement to sell ads on every public bus in Moscow--and a dozen other Soviet cities. By July, Transportation Displays Inc.
NEWS
December 13, 1991 | VIKTOR GREBENSHIKOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Across the country, would-be travelers arrived at airports Thursday only to find that no planes would be flying . . . anywhere. Nearly one-third of the country's 350 airports were shut and dozens more were expected to close down soon, according to officials at the Soviet Civil Aviation Ministry. It may be the hallmark of the tumultuous situation in the country--political triumphs are quickly overshadowed by economic disasters. The announcement of Russian Federation President Boris N.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Aeroflot, the Soviet Union's national airline, is considering dropping Havana and making Miami its gateway to Latin America, aviation officials said. A severe shortage of fuel in Cuba, which Havana blames on a shortfall in Soviet oil supplies, is apparently a key factor, the International Business Chronicle reported.
NEWS
October 24, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet railway system, hit by weeks of strikes and blockades and crippled by poor management, is nearing paralysis and endangering the entire economy. Nikolai S. Konarev, the railways minister, said Monday that more than 500 trains with 25,000 fully laden cars are standing abandoned around the country because the freight yards are too clogged to receive them and some key junctures are too congested for other trains loaded with goods to pass through.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1987 | From Reuters
Iran and the Soviet Union have signed an agreement allowing Iranian ships to use internal Soviet waterways, Tehran radio said Thursday. The radio, monitored in Nicosia, said the agreement will let Iranian vessels use the Soviet navigation network through the Caspian Sea, which lies between the two countries. A road transport system involving Iran, the Soviet Union and Bulgaria also is under study, it added.
NEWS
October 16, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of tons of food purchased abroad to try to make up for consumer shortages are rotting at ports throughout the country because of the breakdown of the Soviet distribution system, Prime Minister Nikolai I. Ryzhkov said Sunday night. In a speech broadcast on Soviet television, Ryzhkov blamed mismanagement and warned: "If things do not improve shortly, we'll have to take tough measures against leaders of all ranks."
NEWS
December 11, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While other countries are shipping thousands of tons of food to the Soviet Union to offset feared shortages this winter, much of the country's own agricultural produce is sitting in railway yards and warehouses because of mismanagement, the Soviet press has charged. "The situation, to be frank, is catastrophic," Nikolai Garyushin, the head of the Soviet railways' chief administration for commercial transport, told the Communist Party newspaper Pravda on Sunday.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Aeroflot, the Soviet Union's national airline, is considering dropping Havana and making Miami its gateway to Latin America, aviation officials said. A severe shortage of fuel in Cuba, which Havana blames on a shortfall in Soviet oil supplies, is apparently a key factor, the International Business Chronicle reported.
NEWS
August 20, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The squinting, weathered watchman at the Korenovsk Elite-Seed State Farm surveyed the small mountains of grain surrounding him, spilling along the pavement under the beating sun, and shrugged. "Yes, the bread is good this year," Nikolai Govorushenko said. "But there's nowhere to send it. The elevator won't take it, the storehouses won't take it. "May God hold back the rain."
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it starts to rain in the Soviet capital, it is as though a referee has called time out in the game of one-upmanship played along the Ring Road that circles the Kremlin. Whether at the wheel of a lowly subcompact Zaparozhets or a chauffeured, black Volga shuttling the Communist elite, drivers promptly brake to a stop, jump out and install their windshield wipers.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Madison Avenue jumped on the glasnost bus in more ways then one Thursday. An American firm that sells advertising space on buses from Los Angeles to New York signed a multimillion-dollar licensing agreement to sell ads on every public bus in Moscow--and a dozen other Soviet cities. By July, Transportation Displays Inc.
NEWS
August 20, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The squinting, weathered watchman at the Korenovsk Elite-Seed State Farm surveyed the small mountains of grain surrounding him, spilling along the pavement under the beating sun, and shrugged. "Yes, the bread is good this year," Nikolai Govorushenko said. "But there's nowhere to send it. The elevator won't take it, the storehouses won't take it. "May God hold back the rain."
NEWS
September 5, 1989 | From United Press International
Bulldozers crushed $4.7 million worth of choice watermelons that rotted in the sun because no trains were available to take them to market, Soviet television said. The spoiled watermelons were destroyed at a collective farm in Astrakhan, near the Caspian Sea 770 miles southeast of Moscow, a field manager told the nationwide "Vremya" news program Sunday.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1990 | LAWRENCE L. KNUTSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The United States and the Soviet Union are moving toward a major increase in scheduled and charter air service, opening for the first time a wide array of destinations in each nation. The development represents one more signal of closer relations between the superpowers and opens a potential opportunity for U.S. commercial air carriers.
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