Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUssr Travel Restrictions
IN THE NEWS

Ussr Travel Restrictions

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | Associated Press
Soviet border guards have begun tearing down the barbed wire barricades along the tightly controlled Romanian border, a KGB official said. The official Tass news agency quoted Georgy Lavranchuk, head of the KGB in the Soviet republic of Moldavia that borders Romania, as saying Wednesday that about 30 miles of barbed wire had been removed. Soviet and Romanian officials also are moving to eliminate the border passes that previously were required, Tass said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 20, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American companies with investments in the Soviet Union were closely monitoring their operations Monday, while analysts said the coup that toppled President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was unlikely to have a significant impact on the U.S. economy. For the moment at least, most U.S. companies were continuing to do business--albeit with caution.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 4, 1988
The Soviet government will soon allow foreigners into the Pacific coast city of Vladivostok, which serves as home port of the Soviet navy and has been closed, with few exceptions, to foreigners for decades, the government newspaper Izvestia said. The newspaper said the decision "is a result of the new political initiatives of our country." Izvestia did not say when Vladivostok would become an open city.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a landmark decision, Soviet lawmakers Monday approved a law giving virtually all citizens the right to travel abroad freely. The measure, meant to tear away what remains of the Iron Curtain, had been bogged down since late 1989, blocked largely by government fears of an uncontrollable outflow of emigrants and would-be migrant workers. Even now, its target date for full implementation is not until January, 1993.
NEWS
July 31, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Soviet lawmakers intent on accelerating the pace of reform elected Kremlin maverick Boris N. Yeltsin, human rights campaigner Andrei D. Sakharov and three other prominent activists Sunday to collectively head the first formal opposition group within this country's national political system in nearly 70 years.
NEWS
June 28, 1987 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union has eased border formalities for people living in specified areas along the frontiers with Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Romania, the government newspaper Izvestia said Saturday. Residents of more than 160 frontier villages now need only a letter or telegram of invitation and their internal passport, a standard identity document, to visit relatives across the border for one week. The visits could be extended if necessary. Previously, such visits took a month or more to arrange.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has ordered the operation of special Aeroflot flights to Saudi Arabia to allow Soviet Muslims to make the ritual pilgrimage to Mecca, his spokesman, Arkady A. Maslennikov, said. Starting in June, the flights are to leave for Jidda, Saudi Arabia, from Moscow and several other Soviet cities with large Muslim populations. The two nations do not have diplomatic relations.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a landmark decision, Soviet lawmakers Monday approved a law giving virtually all citizens the right to travel abroad freely. The measure, meant to tear away what remains of the Iron Curtain, had been bogged down since late 1989, blocked largely by government fears of an uncontrollable outflow of emigrants and would-be migrant workers. Even now, its target date for full implementation is not until January, 1993.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a legal watchdog committee declared Stalin-era residence restrictions unconstitutional last week, it appeared to move the Soviet Union a giant step closer to observing two basic human rights. With the hated propiska, or residence permit, virtually abolished, Soviet citizens would finally have full rights to live where they want and to choose their place of work. But it is not so simple. Demolishing the old Soviet system can be messy, even dangerous.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the average Ivan Ivanov from Omsk or Yaroslavl, it is easier to move to Paris these days than to Moscow. In one of the stranger ironies of this topsy-turvy era of reforms, Soviet emigration rules have been eased almost to Western standards, but Stalin era residence restrictions on the country's cities remain in force, creating nightmarish hassles for would-be migrants.
NEWS
May 7, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hundreds of thousands of Romanians surged across the border with Soviet Moldavia on Sunday in what was intended as a ceremony of friendship but testified to a strong demand for unity among another of Europe's divided people. Eight border crossings were thrown open to Romanians without visas, allowing the first unhindered movement in 50 years between the divided halves of Moldavia. The scene was as joyful as the mingling of East and West Germans when the Berlin Wall was opened last Nov. 9.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has ordered the operation of special Aeroflot flights to Saudi Arabia to allow Soviet Muslims to make the ritual pilgrimage to Mecca, his spokesman, Arkady A. Maslennikov, said. Starting in June, the flights are to leave for Jidda, Saudi Arabia, from Moscow and several other Soviet cities with large Muslim populations. The two nations do not have diplomatic relations.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With pressures for independence building on the fringes of the Soviet empire, the Soviet legislature overwhelmingly passed a law Tuesday fixing tough requirements for member republics to secede and giving President Mikhail S. Gorbachev sweeping powers to declare states of emergency.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | United Press International
The State Department issued a warning Friday to American travelers to the Soviet Union to be on guard against the downside of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's program of reforms: street crime, violence from ethnic clashes and deteriorating health care. The unusual travel advisory urged "tourists in frail health not to visit the Soviet Union."
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | Reuters
Nearly a quarter of a million people took advantage of liberalized travel laws to leave the Soviet Union permanently last year--more than double the number that left in 1988, the Moscow newspaper Trud reported Thursday. Trud said 235,000 Soviet citizens settled abroad last year, up from 108,000 in the previous year. In addition to those leaving for good, more than 2 million Soviet citizens traveled abroad in 1989--up from 261,000 in 1987. The 1988 figures in this category were not available.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union, dogged by unrest in several of its Muslim republics, signed two protocols with Iran to make cross-border visits easier and asked Tehran to help return calm to their frontier, Tehran Radio reported Thursday. It quoted Iran's deputy foreign minister, Mahmoud Vaezi, as saying that the Kremlin should "treat the people in a prudent and peaceful manner." Vaezi told the visiting Soviet deputy minister for protocol and consular affairs, Boris N.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|