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Ussr Women

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NEWS
September 22, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't so long ago that central planners sent Soviet women out of the home and into the workplace. Now, the collapse of the centrally planned economy is singling women out for upheaval again, creating opportunities for the most enterprising but consigning vast numbers to unemployment as their nation's bloated state enterprises strain to grow more efficient. "The face of unemployment in the Soviet Union is a woman's face," said Igor E.
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NEWS
September 22, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't so long ago that central planners sent Soviet women out of the home and into the workplace. Now, the collapse of the centrally planned economy is singling women out for upheaval again, creating opportunities for the most enterprising but consigning vast numbers to unemployment as their nation's bloated state enterprises strain to grow more efficient. "The face of unemployment in the Soviet Union is a woman's face," said Igor E.
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NEWS
January 20, 1989
Ninety percent of all first pregnancies in the Soviet Union end in abortion, and hundreds of women die each year as a result of the operation, the weekly Moscow News reported. An article by Yekaterina Nikolayeva, who recently had an abortion, said that women are treated as if they were on an assembly line, so routine has the operation become in Moscow.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | GREG GRANSDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The three young Soviet women sit quietly onstage, surrounded by blinking game-show lights and colored panels, as the studio audience fires a series of personal questions at them. Meanwhile, three young French businessmen, seated out of view behind a partition, listen intently. "In order to achieve sexual harmony," asks one man in the audience, "should one read books? And if so, when--before or after it's achieved?" Clearly, it's a tricky question, and the women pause to reflect.
NEWS
March 10, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
A group of the forgotten--Soviet Jewish women struggling to emigrate after the more famous refuseniks have gone--are observing a three-day fast to try to remind the world that they are still barred from leaving their country. Some of the women gathered Thursday in the apartment of Ella Varshavsky, a graying, soft-spoken Muscovite who served as a personal secretary in the KGB during the Stalin Era but left her job 41 years ago and began trying to emigrate in 1977.
NEWS
March 9, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
A large group of Jewish women began a hunger strike Sunday, a date celebrated in the Soviet Union and elsewhere as International Women's Day, to protest the denial of permission to emigrate. Rimma Yakir, one of the participants, said that 75 women in Moscow, Leningrad and seven other cities were joining in a three-day fast. They were among 89 so-called refuseniks who wrote to the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet, the nominal parliament, demanding exit visas.
NEWS
March 6, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Women in the Soviet Union are fighting mad over conditions at work and at home and are demanding that candidates in the country's new Western-style elections do something about it. And some candidates, driven by an unprecedented need to attract voters, appear to be listening as complaints roll in over everything from length of working hours to the discomforts of Soviet-made brassieres. But the obstacles that have prevented real improvements in conditions for women remain daunting.
NEWS
January 24, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The highest-ranking woman official in the Soviet Union revealed herself at a rare press conference Monday to be a cultural conservative whose husband does the housework while she puts in 12- to 14-hour days as a deputy premier and non-voting member of the ruling Communist Party Politburo. Alexandra P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mikhail Gorbachev should feel distinctly unflattered. "I cannot even imagine it," says Masha Kalinina, 19, as she waits backstage before an appearance Thursday on "A.M. Los Angeles." "He is as old as my father. It is not possible." Kalinina, a tall, dark-eyed young woman who became the first Soviet beauty queen in 1988, has been accused in a Soviet tabloid of an ongoing affair with the 60-year-old Soviet president. The "Mish-Mash Affair," it was called, after Gorby's nickname, Misha.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | GREG GRANSDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The three young Soviet women sit quietly onstage, surrounded by blinking game-show lights and colored panels, as the studio audience fires a series of personal questions at them. Meanwhile, three young French businessmen, seated out of view behind a partition, listen intently. "In order to achieve sexual harmony," asks one man in the audience, "should one read books? And if so, when--before or after it's achieved?" Clearly, it's a tricky question, and the women pause to reflect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mikhail Gorbachev should feel distinctly unflattered. "I cannot even imagine it," says Masha Kalinina, 19, as she waits backstage before an appearance Thursday on "A.M. Los Angeles." "He is as old as my father. It is not possible." Kalinina, a tall, dark-eyed young woman who became the first Soviet beauty queen in 1988, has been accused in a Soviet tabloid of an ongoing affair with the 60-year-old Soviet president. The "Mish-Mash Affair," it was called, after Gorby's nickname, Misha.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Token," people said when Galina Semyonova was elected to the Soviet Communist Party's Politburo, the first woman to hold full membership in the party's highest body. "She is a woman--that's all there is to it," the party spokesman said, explaining her inclusion in the leadership. "Oh, but she does have a doctorate in philosophy." Even President Mikhail S.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It shouldn't have come as news to most Soviet people that the status of women in their country leaves much to be desired. But President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's sharp denunciation of the overwork and under-appreciation accorded the female population curiously created the biggest stir during his three-hour address to the 28th Communist Party Congress on Monday.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, beset with a dropping birthrate and infant mortality of Third World proportions in some locales, Tuesday adopted a sweeping emergency program championed by President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to aid couples who have babies and improve infant health care. The official Tass news agency said 6 million families would get more money from the government as a result.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | DIANNE RINEHART, Rinehart is a free-lance writer who lives in Moscow
Klavdia Nicholasheva pulls a rake across the wet, mucky grass surrounding the Kremlin walls. A street cleaner on a tight schedule, she insists that she has no time for an interview. That is, until she hears the topic: women's rights in the Soviet Union. Indeed, Nicholasheva--who shovels snow in winter and sweeps roads, sidewalks and parking lots in less inclement weather--has a few things to say on the subject.
NEWS
March 10, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
A group of the forgotten--Soviet Jewish women struggling to emigrate after the more famous refuseniks have gone--are observing a three-day fast to try to remind the world that they are still barred from leaving their country. Some of the women gathered Thursday in the apartment of Ella Varshavsky, a graying, soft-spoken Muscovite who served as a personal secretary in the KGB during the Stalin Era but left her job 41 years ago and began trying to emigrate in 1977.
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev said Tuesday that women in the Soviet Union have even more rights than men but that their burdens as wives and mothers have increased. He made the statement in a speech opening a world congress of women attended by more than 2,250 delegates from 154 countries. The theme of the congress is "peace, justice and equality."
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It shouldn't have come as news to most Soviet people that the status of women in their country leaves much to be desired. But President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's sharp denunciation of the overwork and under-appreciation accorded the female population curiously created the biggest stir during his three-hour address to the 28th Communist Party Congress on Monday.
NEWS
March 6, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Women in the Soviet Union are fighting mad over conditions at work and at home and are demanding that candidates in the country's new Western-style elections do something about it. And some candidates, driven by an unprecedented need to attract voters, appear to be listening as complaints roll in over everything from length of working hours to the discomforts of Soviet-made brassieres. But the obstacles that have prevented real improvements in conditions for women remain daunting.
NEWS
January 24, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The highest-ranking woman official in the Soviet Union revealed herself at a rare press conference Monday to be a cultural conservative whose husband does the housework while she puts in 12- to 14-hour days as a deputy premier and non-voting member of the ruling Communist Party Politburo. Alexandra P.
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