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WORLD
August 10, 2003 | From Associated Press
American and West African military officers ventured into Monrovia's rebel-held port for the first time Saturday and found aid warehouses looted and corpses floating by the docks. The U.S. and West African officers negotiated for days to gain access to the port, across front lines.
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WORLD
August 10, 2003 | From Associated Press
American and West African military officers ventured into Monrovia's rebel-held port for the first time Saturday and found aid warehouses looted and corpses floating by the docks. The U.S. and West African officers negotiated for days to gain access to the port, across front lines.
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NEWS
July 7, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sense of occasion surrounding the London NATO summit that ended here Friday left few in any doubt that the changes agreed to by the alliance's 16 member countries represent a watershed development. But the London summit is likely to shape Europe's future in ways that were hardly mentioned in the afterglow of Friday's agreement.
NEWS
July 7, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sense of occasion surrounding the London NATO summit that ended here Friday left few in any doubt that the changes agreed to by the alliance's 16 member countries represent a watershed development. But the London summit is likely to shape Europe's future in ways that were hardly mentioned in the afterglow of Friday's agreement.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1985
Thomas F. Madison has been named president of Northwestern Bell, Omaha, a unit of the Denver-based telecommunications company USWest.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
RIAS, a jointly funded U.S.-West German radio station that has been been broadcasting since 1946, added regular TV transmissions to its broadcasting menu Monday. The station's first regular TV program, "Tagesaktuell" (Days' Actual Events) began at 5:50 p.m. and ended after about 40 minutes of current news and information, including reports on the U.S. presidential race, labor unrest in Poland and cultural and other local events in Berlin.
SPORTS
July 20, 1989 | From Times wire services
Last-minute substitute Brad Gilbert will play Carl-Uwe Steeb on Friday in the opening match of the Davis Cup semifinal between the United States and defending champion West Germany. Boris Becker, who recently won his third Wimbledon title, meets Andre Agassi of the United States in the second match of the best-of-five competition. The pairings were determined by a draw today. On Saturday, Americans Ken Flach and Robert Seguso are scheduled to play Becker and Eric Jelen in doubles.
SPORTS
August 2, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Wimbledon champion Boris Becker, whose success on the tennis court won't spare him from the West German military draft, will face Eliot Teltscher in the first match of the U.S.-West Germany Davis Cup quarterfinals at Hamburg today, organizers said Thursday. The newspaper Bild quoted Defense Minister Manfred Woerner as saying that Becker, 17, could have to report for active duty in 1987.
NEWS
May 5, 1985 | From a Times Staff Writer
The son of a German count who tried to assassinate Adolf Hitler in 1944 said that he will go to President Reagan's wreath-laying ceremony at a German war cemetery today despite reservations that have nothing to do with the few Waffen SS graves at the cemetery. West German army Col. Berthold von Stauffenberg, son of Claus von Stauffenberg, said that he dislikes all public ceremonies and sees no reason why a gesture of reconciliation is required to maintain U.S.-West German relations.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
A closely guarded truck convoy Thursday began taking away a vast cache of deadly nerve gas secretly stored by the United States near this small West German town for more than 20 years. West German authorities said someone phoned in a bomb threat against the toxic convoy but that the transport of the first shipment of nerve gas proceeded without any hitches.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
A convoy of trucks today began removing a vast cache of deadly nerve gas that was secretly stored by the United States just outside this small West German town. The convoy took away the first batch of 100,000 gas-filled artillery shells stored at a U.S. military site at Clausen, which is near Kaiserslautern in the southwest part of the country. The lethal cargo, destined for destruction on a Pacific atoll, is being removed under a 1986 U.S.-West German agreement at a cost of $83.1 million.
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