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Uta Hagen

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2004 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Uta Hagen, known for her signature Broadway turn as Martha, the raging wife in Edward Albee's classic play "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" and also as a legendary teacher who nurtured dozens of future stars, has died. She was 84. Hagen's daughter, Leticia Ferrer, said her mother died Wednesday in her apartment overlooking Greenwich Village's Washington Square Park. She had been in poor health since suffering a stroke in October 2001, Ferrer said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2004 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Uta Hagen, known for her signature Broadway turn as Martha, the raging wife in Edward Albee's classic play "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" and also as a legendary teacher who nurtured dozens of future stars, has died. She was 84. Hagen's daughter, Leticia Ferrer, said her mother died Wednesday in her apartment overlooking Greenwich Village's Washington Square Park. She had been in poor health since suffering a stroke in October 2001, Ferrer said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2001 | HUGH HART, Hugh Hart is a regular contributor to Calendar
She made her 1938 Broadway debut with Alfred Lunt and Lynne Fontanne in "The Seagull," won a 1963 Tony as the original Martha in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," wrote the now-classic "Respect for Acting" in 1973 and, in the course of five decades, taught her craft to everyone from Jason Robards to Matthew Broderick. But none of that much mattered when Uta Hagen arrived in Los Angeles this spring to begin rehearsals with David Hyde Pierce on a new play.
NEWS
July 15, 2001 | Ann Conway
The connections to New York's Herbert Berghof Studios were everywhere. There was Uta Hagen, 82, who has taught there since 1947 and is now co-starring in Richard Alfieri's "Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks" at the Geffen Playhouse. There were her many former students--including Christine Lahti, who chaired Tuesday's event. There were the beneficiaries of the event--the HB Playwright's Foundation (the HB for Herbert Berghof, Hagen's late husband) the Geffen, and the Actors' Fund of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2001
Re the article on Uta Hagen and David Hyde Pierce ("Truly in Step," by Hugh Hart, June 3): It is a good thing I live in Las Vegas. I was able to put my Sunday Calendar out on the patio to dry. With all that gushing, you can imagine how sopping wet it was. DAVID THOMAS Las Vegas
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2001
Wrong, wrong, wrong! Michael Phillips' review of "Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks" ("In Class by Themselves," June 9) couldn't have been more off. To compare Richard Alfieri's sensitive, insightful script to a "Golden Girls" episode makes me wonder whether Phillips and I saw the same play. At least he gave Uta Hagen and David Hyde Pierce the kudos that they so richly deserve for their performances. Perhaps Phillips never had a widowed mother who lived alone in Florida and took endless dance lessons as a way to fend off loneliness and isolation.
NEWS
July 15, 2001 | Ann Conway
The connections to New York's Herbert Berghof Studios were everywhere. There was Uta Hagen, 82, who has taught there since 1947 and is now co-starring in Richard Alfieri's "Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks" at the Geffen Playhouse. There were her many former students--including Christine Lahti, who chaired Tuesday's event. There were the beneficiaries of the event--the HB Playwright's Foundation (the HB for Herbert Berghof, Hagen's late husband) the Geffen, and the Actors' Fund of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
I have renewed respect this morning for the woman who wrote "Respect for Acting." I have the same for her co-star in "Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks," Richard Alfieri's new heart warmer--"new" and "warm" being relative--making its world premiere at the Geffen Playhouse. Uta Hagen and David Hyde Pierce are far, far better than this thing deserves.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Springtime slots that have remained vacant in the Ahmanson Theatre and Geffen Playhouse seasons are about to be filled. The Ahmanson will announce today that it will present "3hree," a trio of short musicals, while the Geffen is expected to name as its fifth show "Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks," pending the completion of negotiations with potential stars Uta Hagen and David Hyde Pierce. "3hree" replaces "Flower Drum Song," which was canceled in December.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2000 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, Susan Freudenheim is a Times staff writer
In recognition of her 80th birthday last year, actress Uta Hagen returned for the first time to a role that helped define her early career. In a sparsely staged reading at Broadway's Majestic Theater, she once again played Martha in Edward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," the part she created in 1962 in the original Broadway and London productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2001
Re the article on Uta Hagen and David Hyde Pierce ("Truly in Step," by Hugh Hart, June 3): It is a good thing I live in Las Vegas. I was able to put my Sunday Calendar out on the patio to dry. With all that gushing, you can imagine how sopping wet it was. DAVID THOMAS Las Vegas
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2001
Wrong, wrong, wrong! Michael Phillips' review of "Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks" ("In Class by Themselves," June 9) couldn't have been more off. To compare Richard Alfieri's sensitive, insightful script to a "Golden Girls" episode makes me wonder whether Phillips and I saw the same play. At least he gave Uta Hagen and David Hyde Pierce the kudos that they so richly deserve for their performances. Perhaps Phillips never had a widowed mother who lived alone in Florida and took endless dance lessons as a way to fend off loneliness and isolation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
I have renewed respect this morning for the woman who wrote "Respect for Acting." I have the same for her co-star in "Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks," Richard Alfieri's new heart warmer--"new" and "warm" being relative--making its world premiere at the Geffen Playhouse. Uta Hagen and David Hyde Pierce are far, far better than this thing deserves.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2001 | HUGH HART, Hugh Hart is a regular contributor to Calendar
She made her 1938 Broadway debut with Alfred Lunt and Lynne Fontanne in "The Seagull," won a 1963 Tony as the original Martha in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," wrote the now-classic "Respect for Acting" in 1973 and, in the course of five decades, taught her craft to everyone from Jason Robards to Matthew Broderick. But none of that much mattered when Uta Hagen arrived in Los Angeles this spring to begin rehearsals with David Hyde Pierce on a new play.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Springtime slots that have remained vacant in the Ahmanson Theatre and Geffen Playhouse seasons are about to be filled. The Ahmanson will announce today that it will present "3hree," a trio of short musicals, while the Geffen is expected to name as its fifth show "Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks," pending the completion of negotiations with potential stars Uta Hagen and David Hyde Pierce. "3hree" replaces "Flower Drum Song," which was canceled in December.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2000 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, Susan Freudenheim is a Times staff writer
In recognition of her 80th birthday last year, actress Uta Hagen returned for the first time to a role that helped define her early career. In a sparsely staged reading at Broadway's Majestic Theater, she once again played Martha in Edward Albee's "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?," the part she created in 1962 in the original Broadway and London productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2001
A special gala benefit performance of Richard Alfieri's "Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks," starring Uta Hagen and David Hyde Pierce, will be presented as a tribute to Jack Lemmon at 7:30 p.m. July 10 at the Geffen Playhouse, 10886 Le Conte Ave., Westwood. Featuring a post-performance reception, the event will benefit the Actors' Fund of America, the HB Playwright's Foundation and the Geffen Playhouse. Tickets are $100, $150 and $250. (323) 933-9266, Ext. 54.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2003 | From Associated Press
Two singers with very different styles -- country star George Jones and Motown legend Smokey Robinson -- were among those honored at the White House Thursday with the National Medal of Arts. The award, established by Congress in 1984, is given for outstanding contributions to the arts in the United States.
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