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Utah And Martin Fleischmann

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NEWS
April 12, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Charles A. Barnes is a highly respected physicist at Caltech, and like others in his field, he believes that he understands the basic laws of physics that govern such fundamental reactions as the melding of two atoms into one through nuclear fusion. Many of the best minds in science have studied that process extensively over the last four decades, and the laws that govern it are considered among the most elemental in science. And that is why people such as Barnes are having trouble sleeping these days.
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NEWS
May 28, 1989 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
Cold fusion may turn out to be, as one East Coast physicist described it, the greatest discovery since fire. Or it could ultimately be dismissed as just another widely ballyhooed dud. But regardless of the final judgment, at Caltech it will long be remembered as the source of a phenomenal burst of intellectual energy, sweeping chemists and physicists into an intense, sometimes giddy two-month search for the truth. "It's like an incredible detective story," said electrochemist Nathan Lewis, the point man in Caltech's interdisciplinary effort to replicate the dramatic findings announced two months ago by the University of Utah.
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NEWS
May 21, 1989 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
Cold fusion may turn out to be, as one East Coast physicist described it, the greatest discovery since fire. Or it could ultimately be dismissed as just another widely ballyhooed dud. But regardless of the final judgment, at Caltech it will long be remembered as the source of a phenomenal burst of intellectual energy, sweeping chemists and physicists into an intense, sometimes giddy two-month search for the truth. 'Incredible Detective Story' "It's like an incredible detective story," says electrochemist Nathan Lewis, the point man in Caltech's interdisciplinary effort to replicate the dramatic findings announced two months ago by the University of Utah.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1989 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
Cold fusion may turn out to be, as one East Coast physicist described it, the greatest discovery since fire. Or it could ultimately be dismissed as just another widely ballyhooed dud. But regardless of the final judgment, at Caltech it will long be remembered as the source of a phenomenal burst of intellectual energy, sweeping chemists and physicists into an intense, sometimes giddy two-month search for the truth. "It's like an incredible detective story," said electrochemist Nathan Lewis, the point man in Caltech's interdisciplinary effort to replicate the dramatic findings announced two months ago by the University of Utah.
NEWS
April 13, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II and LEE DYE, Times Science Writers
The effort to produce nuclear fusion in a test tube went global Wednesday when Soviet physicists announced that they had succeeded in duplicating a controversial Utah experiment while the two scientists who started it all defended their work on two continents. At the same time, a top scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced that he had developed a theory explaining how the "cold fusion" process works. Although other MIT scientists said a few days ago that they had given up after failing to duplicate the experiment, the institute announced that it had "filed patent applications in connection with the theoretical analysis" developed by Peter Hagelstein, 34, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1989 | EDMUND NEWTON, Times Staff Writer
Cold fusion may turn out to be, as one East Coast physicist described it, the greatest discovery since fire. Or it could ultimately be dismissed as just another widely ballyhooed dud. But regardless of the final judgment, at Caltech it will long be remembered as the source of a phenomenal burst of intellectual energy, sweeping chemists and physicists into an intense, sometimes giddy two-month search for the truth. "It's like an incredible detective story," said electrochemist Nathan Lewis, the point man in Caltech's interdisciplinary effort to replicate the dramatic findings announced two months ago by the University of Utah.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1989 | From staff and wire reports and
University of Utah physicists announced last week that they could find no evidence of a nuclear reaction in the room-temperature fusion experiment conducted by Stanley Pons of Utah and Martin Fleischmann of the University of Southampton in England. Pons and Fleischmann reported in March that they could produce excess energy from fusion in an electrochemical cell involving platinum and palladium electrodes immersed in so-called heavy water.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
A tabletop experiment created nuclear fusion -- long seen as a possible clean energy solution -- under lab conditions, scientists reported today. But the amount of energy produced was too little to be seen as a breakthrough in solving the world's energy needs. For years, scientists have sought to harness controllable nuclear fusion, the same power that lights the sun and stars. The latest experiment relied on a tiny crystal to generate a strong electric field.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
Richard Fox had no trouble obtaining concert tickets for the popular British rock group New Order. But when he attempted to pick up tickets Wednesday for a lecture by physicist Steven Jones, Fox was told the event was so popular all the tickets had been snapped up days ago. New Order specializes in a type of music some call "manic-depressive disco." Jones, a professor at Brigham Young University, specializes in a field called "cold fusion." And during the last month, cold fusion experts have been accorded greater celebrity status than some rock groups.
NEWS
March 28, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Scientists at widely scattered laboratories thus far have been unable to duplicate the efforts of two scientists who claimed last week to have produced fusion at room temperature with a simple apparatus, various sources said Monday. The lack of success was blamed partly on a shortage of information about exactly how the experiment was conducted.
NEWS
April 13, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II and LEE DYE, Times Science Writers
The effort to produce nuclear fusion in a test tube went global Wednesday when Soviet physicists announced that they had succeeded in duplicating a controversial Utah experiment while the two scientists who started it all defended their work on two continents. At the same time, a top scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced that he had developed a theory explaining how the "cold fusion" process works. Although other MIT scientists said a few days ago that they had given up after failing to duplicate the experiment, the institute announced that it had "filed patent applications in connection with the theoretical analysis" developed by Peter Hagelstein, 34, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Charles A. Barnes is a highly respected physicist at Caltech, and like others in his field, he believes that he understands the basic laws of physics that govern such fundamental reactions as the melding of two atoms into one through nuclear fusion. Many of the best minds in science have studied that process extensively over the last four decades, and the laws that govern it are considered among the most elemental in science. And that is why people such as Barnes are having trouble sleeping these days.
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