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December 24, 1993 | JAMES G. WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Michael Medved, you have fans here. In the most conservative towns in one of the most conservative states in the nation, film critic Medved's campaign for less sex, violence and profanity in the movies is guaranteed to win boosters. In fact, Mr. Medved, they're way ahead of you here. On one Wednesday each month, the 12 citizens of the Provo-Orem Media Review Commission gather at Provo City Hall for pizza and frank discussion of what Hollywood is sending to their towns' silver screens.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1993 | JAMES G. WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Michael Medved, you have fans here. In the most conservative towns in one of the most conservative states in the nation, film critic Medved's campaign for less sex, violence and profanity in the movies is guaranteed to win boosters. In fact, Mr. Medved, they're way ahead of you here. On one Wednesday each month, the 12 citizens of the Provo-Orem Media Review Commission gather at Provo City Hall for pizza and frank discussion of what Hollywood is sending to their towns' silver screens.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1988
Your front-page piece regarding Salt Lake City (Part I, Feb. 3) has just come to hand. The subjective impressions conveyed by the article were purportedly based on facts; however, there were some very specific factual errors relating to this office which I must correct for the record. Your writer said that the attorney general had outlawed the use of the term "sexual intercourse" in the schools. This is patently false, and the attorney general has not even addressed such an issue.
OPINION
July 10, 1994 | MAXINE HANKS, Maxine Hanks is the editor of "Women and Authority: Re-emerging Mormon Feminism" (Signature Books, 1992). She lives and writes in Salt Lake City.
When Howard W. Hunter became president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints last month, his first public act was a plea for alienated Mormons to "come back," or return to fellowship. Yet more than half of the 9 million church members can never participate fully because they are women. To find reconciliation, Mormon women must look to the past. The historical relationship of men and women in the Mormon church is a conflicted one.
SPORTS
January 27, 2002 | From Associated Press
When the first Mormon settlers wandered into the Salt Lake Valley in 1847, they were on the run from public scrutiny, seeking to be left alone with their religion and polygamous lifestyle. Now, with the Winter Games set to begin in Salt Lake City on Feb. 8, the Mormons are again being scrutinized Critics have accused Utah's dominant religion of exploiting the opportunity to be the host of an Olympics, while nervous organizers have struggled to keep the focus on the games.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi
Before the shooting, David Serbeck and Reginald Campos were pillars of their community, living at opposite ends of an unfinished development here at the edge of Salt Lake City's sprawl. Serbeck, a genial 37-year-old father of two and former Army sniper, welcomed new arrivals to the neighborhood by offering to help install their sprinkler systems or work on their yards. Campos, a 43-year-old CPA and father of four, tried to forge a community in his neighborhood by warning new residents about a spate of mailbox thefts and lobbying authorities to investigate the incidents.
OPINION
November 17, 1991 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Center for the New West and an international fellow at the Pepperdine University School of Business and Management
With Time magazine's attack cover on California, the current wave of California-bashing has reached its lowest common denominator. Already regarded in the East as the "the next Houston," California is now instructed by the mavens at Time to take economic-development lessons from Utah, whose culture is said to be appealing to foreign investors. That's right, Utah.
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