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April 11, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An enduring memory that Susan and John Leavitt have of their years in Anaheim was the night in 1989 that they saw a young man die from gunshot wounds on their block. Today, the Leavitts are living better on less money in this postcard-pretty city at the base of snow-topped Pikes Peak. Leaving the crime and congestion of Southern California far behind, they are among a burgeoning crowd of Golden State refugees pumping new life into Colorado and the rest of the Rocky Mountain states.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1996 | MATTHEW BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jon Freston would like to see betting on horse racing in this Mormon stronghold, but he's a realistic guy. He tells this joke: Three bettors died and went to heaven. They met God, and asked if parimutuel betting would ever be allowed in Utah. "Yes," replied the deity, "but not in my lifetime." Today, 48 states allow some gambling.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1996 | MATTHEW BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jon Freston would like to see betting on horse racing in this Mormon stronghold, but he's a realistic guy. He tells this joke: Three bettors died and went to heaven. They met God, and asked if parimutuel betting would ever be allowed in Utah. "Yes," replied the deity, "but not in my lifetime." Today, 48 states allow some gambling.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An enduring memory that Susan and John Leavitt have of their years in Anaheim was the night in 1989 that they saw a young man die from gunshot wounds on their block. Today, the Leavitts are living better on less money in this postcard-pretty city at the base of snow-topped Pikes Peak. Leaving the crime and congestion of Southern California far behind, they are among a burgeoning crowd of Golden State refugees pumping new life into Colorado and the rest of the Rocky Mountain states.
NATIONAL
May 12, 2002 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing on Main Street on a recent spring evening, it's difficult to conjure up the nighttime scene that existed here only two months ago, during the Winter Olympics: Lights, music, street theater ... people. Now, only an hour after most offices have closed, the main pedestrian mall is deserted. Stores are shuttered. Those people who are here are waiting for the light rail train that will carry them home to the suburbs.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2007 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
It's a small gesture of defiance -- a narrow metal bridge that allows off-road vehicles illegal access to this archeologically rich canyon. But the modest structure, built by San Juan County officials on U.S. government land, is a symbol of the widespread local resistance to federal authority across much of southern Utah's magnificent countryside.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The Obama administration has approved a new natural gas drilling project in Utah that is designed to support more than 4,000 jobs and boost the production of energy -- while protecting the environment. All are political issues in the current presidential election year. U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced the approval on Tuesday during an appearance outside Salt Lake City. Texas-based Anadarko Petroleum Corp. will be allowed to develop up to 3,675 natural gas wells in the next decade in Uintah County, about 170 miles southeast of Salt Lake City near the Colorado border.
NEWS
June 2, 2002 | PATTY HENETZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Farmers and politicians call Utah's fourth straight year of below-average snowpack a disaster. But a University of Utah political science professor who writes on Western water issues says that ignores a simple fact: Deserts are supposed to be dry. "It's a mistake to talk about the drought as a crisis," said Dan McCool. "We are always in a drought. That's the definition of a desert. It's ignoring that Utah is a desert that's causing the problem." McCool isn't alone in his thinking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2003 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
It's an audacious -- some say absurd -- scheme: Take Colorado River water just before it slips over the Utah border, pump it east more than 200 miles, lift it 5,000 feet over the Rocky Mountains and deliver it to the state's burgeoning Front Range communities. Nicknamed the "Big Straw," it is a big, old-fashioned kind of idea, reminiscent of the mega-water projects that greened the West in the 20th century. Estimates of its cost start at $2.5 billion and climb.
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