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NEWS
June 27, 1994 | from Associated Press
Nevada leads the nation in the rate of smoking-related deaths, while the Mormon Church's prohibition against using tobacco keeps Utah relatively smoke-free. Overall, smoking-related deaths are declining. These were some of the conclusions of the government's first state-by-state look in five years at cigarette smoking, the single most preventable cause of premature death in the United States.
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NEWS
September 1, 1998 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Tom Murdock founded a business that would grow into the nation's largest maker of herbal medicines, he found inspiration in Arizona's high desert. It was in the late 1960s and Murdock's wife, Lavoli, was gravely ill with cancer that hadn't responded to conventional treatments. Murdock had heard about a Navajo medicine man who touted a desert chaparral shrub as a remedy for ailments from colds to cancer.
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NEWS
February 22, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
A recent outbreak of rheumatic fever in Utah demonstrates that the disease "remains an important threat" in the United States, despite a dramatic decline in the number of cases over the last 30 years, doctors warned. Researchers at the University of Utah Medical School said their findings show vigilance is still needed to combat the disease, which usually develops in children with strep throat and can cause life-threatening heart disorders. "Rheumatic fever is still a problem," Dr. Herbert D.
NEWS
June 27, 1994 | from Associated Press
Nevada leads the nation in the rate of smoking-related deaths, while the Mormon Church's prohibition against using tobacco keeps Utah relatively smoke-free. Overall, smoking-related deaths are declining. These were some of the conclusions of the government's first state-by-state look in five years at cigarette smoking, the single most preventable cause of premature death in the United States.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Fallout from the more than 100 above-ground nuclear weapons tests in Nevada between 1951 and 1958 may have been responsible for a small percentage of the deaths from leukemia in Utah between 1952 and 1981, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Utah and the USC Medical School. The study, which will be published next week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., confirms the results of previous studies.
NEWS
September 1, 1998 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Tom Murdock founded a business that would grow into the nation's largest maker of herbal medicines, he found inspiration in Arizona's high desert. It was in the late 1960s and Murdock's wife, Lavoli, was gravely ill with cancer that hadn't responded to conventional treatments. Murdock had heard about a Navajo medicine man who touted a desert chaparral shrub as a remedy for ailments from colds to cancer.
NEWS
February 20, 2002 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Doctors here have for years talked about the widespread use of antidepressants in the state. But there was no hard evidence until a national study that tracked drug prescriptions came to an unexpected conclusion: Antidepressant drugs are prescribed in Utah more often than in any other state, at a rate nearly twice the national average. Utah's high usage was cited by one of the study's authors as the most surprising finding to emerge from the data.
SPORTS
March 17, 1985 | United Press International
The University of Utah Health Sciences Center has performed its second human heart transplant, an official confirmed Friday. Spokesman John Dwan said the patient, who was not identified, was doing well after the Thursday night surgery.
NEWS
October 1, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Peter Boyle, who played a hippie-hating hard hat in "Joe" and the monster in "Young Frankenstein," was listed in fair condition today after apparently suffering a mild stroke. Boyle, 54, was hospitalized Sunday after experiencing mild weakness and a headache, said nursing supervisor Charlene Barrett of University of Utah Health Sciences Center. "He's awake and has been watching football on TV," she said.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | Associated Press
A 7-year-old girl, the last of the children burned in a bomb blast during an aborted hostage-taking at a school in Cokeville, Wyo., has been released from the University of Utah Health Sciences Center, officials said Wednesday. Billie Jo Hutchinson was discharged Tuesday from the hospital's burn unit. She had been seriously injured on May 16 when David and Doris Young took 150 students and teachers hostage in an elementary school and demanded $2-million ransom for each hostage.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Fallout from the more than 100 above-ground nuclear weapons tests in Nevada between 1951 and 1958 may have been responsible for a small percentage of the deaths from leukemia in Utah between 1952 and 1981, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Utah and the USC Medical School. The study, which will be published next week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., confirms the results of previous studies.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
A recent outbreak of rheumatic fever in Utah demonstrates that the disease "remains an important threat" in the United States, despite a dramatic decline in the number of cases over the last 30 years, doctors warned. Researchers at the University of Utah Medical School said their findings show vigilance is still needed to combat the disease, which usually develops in children with strep throat and can cause life-threatening heart disorders. "Rheumatic fever is still a problem," Dr. Herbert D.
NEWS
September 28, 1988 | Associated Press
Pipe-bomb killer Mark Hofmann has been returned to Utah State Prison after 11 days in a hospital for an overdose of an anti-depressant drug, officials said. Hofmann, 33, was released from the University of Utah Health Sciences Center on Monday and taken to the prison's hospital unit. Hofmann is serving a five-years-to-life sentence for his guilty pleas to two 1985 pipe-bomb murders.
MAGAZINE
January 11, 1987
Parent Care is the only national organization for both parents and professionals concerned with infants who require intensive care at birth. We form parent-support groups, encourage communication between parents and perinatal professional, facilitate networking between parent groups and health-care organizations, and enhance public awareness of the special needs of families of premature and high-risk infants. For more information, contact our national headquarters at: Parents Care, c/o University of Utah Health Science Center, Room 2A210, 50 N. Medical Drive, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84132.
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