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February 16, 1999 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one can accuse Ruben Ortega, the dean of big-city Latino police chiefs, of being a slave to political correctness. Ortega, the 59-year-old son of an immigrant who himself grew up toiling in the fields of central Arizona next to mexicano laborers, has strong ideas about who is to blame for the worst crime problems in Salt Lake City: illegal immigrants.
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NATIONAL
May 11, 2011
SALT LAKE CITY — A federal judge on Tuesday blocked a new immigration law in Utah that would have allowed police to check the citizenship status of anyone they arrest. Judge Clark Waddoups issued his ruling in Salt Lake City hours after the law went into effect, citing its similarity to an Arizona law now before federal courts. The American Civil Liberties Union and National Immigration Law Center had sued to stop the law, warning that its implementation could lead to racial profiling.
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NATIONAL
May 11, 2011
SALT LAKE CITY — A federal judge on Tuesday blocked a new immigration law in Utah that would have allowed police to check the citizenship status of anyone they arrest. Judge Clark Waddoups issued his ruling in Salt Lake City hours after the law went into effect, citing its similarity to an Arizona law now before federal courts. The American Civil Liberties Union and National Immigration Law Center had sued to stop the law, warning that its implementation could lead to racial profiling.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
Utah won national attention this year for promoting a gentler approach to immigration when it passed a law essentially allowing illegal immigrants to remain in the state if they work and don't commit crimes. Yet on Tuesday, the American Civil Liberties Union and the National Immigration Law Center filed a federal lawsuit to stop the implementation next week of another Utah immigration law, one modeled on a controversial Arizona law that enlists local police to help root out illegal immigrants.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
Utah won national attention this year for promoting a gentler approach to immigration when it passed a law essentially allowing illegal immigrants to remain in the state if they work and don't commit crimes. Yet on Tuesday, the American Civil Liberties Union and the National Immigration Law Center filed a federal lawsuit to stop the implementation next week of another Utah immigration law, one modeled on a controversial Arizona law that enlists local police to help root out illegal immigrants.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | FARA WARNER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thousands of Pacific Islanders, trading their tropical paradise for a chance at the American dream in Utah, have found only disillusionment in the land of opportunity. They have found poor jobs, fractured families, youth gangs and an education system unequipped to bridge cultural and language barriers. "We didn't foresee what was lying ahead of us. We just came quickly, rushing to come to the United States," says Sione Fakahua, pastor of the First Tongan Methodist Church.
NATIONAL
April 14, 2011 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
Following Arizona's lead, the Georgia Legislature on Thursday passed a strict measure that would empower police to check the immigration status of "criminal" suspects and force many businesses to do the same with potential employees. The bill passed in the waning hours of the legislative session despite critics' outcries. Immigrant advocates threatened a state boycott if it became law, and Georgia's powerful agricultural industry warned, among other things, that federal guest worker programs alone could not provide enough laborers to meet farmers' needs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of April 7 -13, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SERIES My Cat From Hell A deaf and blind cat stops using its litter box in the season premiere. 8 p.m. Animal Planet That's followed at 9 by the premiere of "My Cat From Hell: Scratch Tracks. " Gruden's QB Camp USC's Matt Barkley has his turn in this new episode.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2010 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
Since the distribution of an anonymous letter this week containing the names, addresses and other personal data of more than 1,300 Utah residents said to be undocumented immigrants, Tony Yapias' phone has not stopped ringing. "I have one phone line; I've already missed 60 calls now, and there are 72 messages," said Yapias, director of the advocacy group Proyecto Latino de Utah. "People wanting to know if they're on the list. Should they move to another state? Should they leave the country?
NEWS
February 16, 1999 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one can accuse Ruben Ortega, the dean of big-city Latino police chiefs, of being a slave to political correctness. Ortega, the 59-year-old son of an immigrant who himself grew up toiling in the fields of central Arizona next to mexicano laborers, has strong ideas about who is to blame for the worst crime problems in Salt Lake City: illegal immigrants.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | FARA WARNER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thousands of Pacific Islanders, trading their tropical paradise for a chance at the American dream in Utah, have found only disillusionment in the land of opportunity. They have found poor jobs, fractured families, youth gangs and an education system unequipped to bridge cultural and language barriers. "We didn't foresee what was lying ahead of us. We just came quickly, rushing to come to the United States," says Sione Fakahua, pastor of the First Tongan Methodist Church.
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