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Utah Shakespearean Festival

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1993
The Utah Shakespearean Festival here is thriving as never before in its 32-year history, fueled to a large degree by Southern California talent--much of it from UC Irvine. When many theater companies around the country are dying or struggling to survive, this festival is not just luring playgoers by the tens of thousands to a mile-high, former iron-mining town where the desert meets the mountains, but is taking aim at a year-round season with plans for an $18-million expansion.
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NATIONAL
August 31, 2003 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
Each year when summer ends and the tourists leave, the economy plummets in this little town nestled among the crimson cliffs and twisted juniper of southwest Utah. That gave Mayor Gerald Sherratt an idea. He decided to boost off-season revenue with a festival of feasts, shows and pageantry based upon its Viking heritage. And he didn't let the lack of that heritage stand in the way.
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TRAVEL
August 2, 1998 | VANI RANGACHAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Rangachar is an editor in the Travel section
I am sitting idly beneath the shade of a tall pine, seeking relief from the daytime temperature of 104 while watching two teenagers gesturing wildly and talking in exaggerated tones. The language they speak is English, but odd to the ear. Behind me rise the brick and half-timbered walls of a building resembling the Old Globe Theater in London. Strolling the grounds are peddlers, simply costumed in peasant blouses and long skirts, with flower wreaths entwined in their hair.
TRAVEL
August 2, 1998 | VANI RANGACHAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Rangachar is an editor in the Travel section
I am sitting idly beneath the shade of a tall pine, seeking relief from the daytime temperature of 104 while watching two teenagers gesturing wildly and talking in exaggerated tones. The language they speak is English, but odd to the ear. Behind me rise the brick and half-timbered walls of a building resembling the Old Globe Theater in London. Strolling the grounds are peddlers, simply costumed in peasant blouses and long skirts, with flower wreaths entwined in their hair.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2003 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
Each year when summer ends and the tourists leave, the economy plummets in this little town nestled among the crimson cliffs and twisted juniper of southwest Utah. That gave Mayor Gerald Sherratt an idea. He decided to boost off-season revenue with a festival of feasts, shows and pageantry based upon its Viking heritage. And he didn't let the lack of that heritage stand in the way.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1993 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Deanne Lorette, 27, who just completed her graduate training in theater at UC Irvine, the Utah Shakespearean Festival provides what she calls "invaluable opportunities." One of the festival's leading younger actors, Lorette is playing Hermia in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" as well as a supporting role in "The Royal Family." Last year she played Portia in "The Merchant of Venice," Calphurnia in "Julius Caesar" and Elvira in "Blithe Spirit."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2000
The following is a complete list of the 54th annual Tony Award winners, presented Sunday evening in New York: * Play: "Copenhagen" by Michael Frayn * Musical: "Contact" * Revival/Play: "The Real Thing" * Revival/Musical: "Kiss Me, Kate" * Book of a Musical: Richard Nelson, "James Joyce's The Dead" * Original Score: Elton John and Tim Rice, "Aida" * Director/Musical: Michael Blakemore, "Kiss Me, Kate" * Director/Play: Michael Blakemore, "Copenhagen" * Leading Actor/Play: Stephen Dillane, "The
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Revivals of two golden oldies were the top vote getters in Broadway's Tony nominations, announced Monday in New York. "Kiss Me, Kate" nabbed 12 nominations; "The Music Man" took eight. Among new shows, "The Wild Party" overcame mixed critical reactions to earn seven nominations, including best new musical, tying the number of nods received by the more widely acclaimed "Contact." Three of the nominees for best musical will be seen at the Ahmanson Theatre in Los Angeles within the next 15 months.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2009 | David Ng
The collars are stiff and the corsets feel a tad too tight in the new revival of "Candida" at the Colony Theatre in Burbank. This production of George Bernard Shaw's 1898 comedy of domestic upheaval is a handsome and respectable endeavor, but the cast's overly mannered delivery suggests that some of the wardrobe starch has found its way into the backstage drinking water. Set in Victorian England, "Candida" portrays a rarefied milieu in which emotional repression reigns supreme and women are regarded as the property of their husbands.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1998 | Don Shirley, Don Shirley is a Times staff writer
Inside at the Ford. That's the new name for the sub-100-seat space on the bottom floor of the Los Angeles County-owned John Anson Ford Amphitheatre in the Cahuenga Pass. The space was known for years as the Taper, Too, because its most frequent occupant was the Mark Taper Forum. The downtown company used the small Hollywood location for full seasons of intimate productions as well as play workshops (including the L.A. public's first glance of "Angels in America") and readings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1993
The Utah Shakespearean Festival here is thriving as never before in its 32-year history, fueled to a large degree by Southern California talent--much of it from UC Irvine. When many theater companies around the country are dying or struggling to survive, this festival is not just luring playgoers by the tens of thousands to a mile-high, former iron-mining town where the desert meets the mountains, but is taking aim at a year-round season with plans for an $18-million expansion.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1993 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Deanne Lorette, 27, who just completed her graduate training in theater at UC Irvine, the Utah Shakespearean Festival provides what she calls "invaluable opportunities." One of the festival's leading younger actors, Lorette is playing Hermia in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" as well as a supporting role in "The Royal Family." Last year she played Portia in "The Merchant of Venice," Calphurnia in "Julius Caesar" and Elvira in "Blithe Spirit."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
For starters, some name dropping: Gregory Peck, Dorothy McGuire and Mel Ferrer started the La Jolla Playhouse in 1947 with a summer production of "Night Must Fall." Zsa Zsa Gabor helped close the place 17 years later in "Blithe Spirit." The playhouse got started again in 1983 with a 25-year-old director and a 31-year-old artistic director, Peter Sellars and Des McAnuff, respectively, staging Bertolt Brecht's "The Visions of Simone Machard." Ah, what a difference a vision and a few years make.
NEWS
April 6, 1986 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
It almost makes you cringe: Mystery centerpieces (we hear they're live) are being concocted by Shelton Ellis of Gump's for the Natural History Museum's Dinosaur Ball on Saturday. In the museum's vast halls, not only will the fossils gather for a ball, to paraphrase Ogden Nash, but so will a very black-tie crowd. Bread sculpture dinosaurs (inedible) have been sighted around Los Angeles recently, bearing the news. They're created by the baker at Dino De Laurentiis' DDL Foodshow.
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