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NATIONAL
February 25, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez
A Utah lawmaker wants to ensure that the voices of drinkers will be heard in the state known for its strict regulation of alcohol. His solution? A drinking test of sorts. But in this case, one has to drink to pass it. A bill introduced by state Rep. Brian Doughty cleared a House of Representatives committee would require that at least two members of the state's five-member Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission be drinkers. Loosening liquor laws in the state has been one of Doughty's causes as a lawmaker.
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OPINION
June 15, 2009 | Craig Childs, Craig Childs is the author of several books, including "House of Rain" and "Animal Dialogues."
After federal raids last week on the somewhat casual, small-town traffic in illicit Southwest artifacts, one prominent pot hunter is dead and nearly a dozen more are under indictment. The criminal actions grew out of a two-year undercover investigation in the Four Corners region, in which a wired informant purchased more than $300,000 in illicit antiquities. Most were bought in the high desert town of Blanding, Utah.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2009 | Nicholas Riccardi and Jim Tankersley
Striking at a longtime practice in the Four Corners area, federal authorities Wednesday unsealed indictments against 24 people in what they called the largest investigation ever into the looting of Native American artifacts on public lands. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced the charges at a Salt Lake City news conference and said in a telephone interview that many of the stolen items, valued at $335,000, came from sacred burial sites.
NEWS
March 3, 1985 | From United Press International
The millions of Americans tuned into the Academy Awards next month will be hit with a sophisticated new advertising campaign urging them to visit Hollywood and other California landmarks to bolster the Golden State's sagging tourism industry. In the new state-sponsored campaign, TV audiences from New England to the Northwest will see samples of the energy of Los Angeles, the romance of San Francisco and the diverse recreational attractions of San Diego.
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | JAMES G. WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Growing up in Dayton, Ohio, Richard Rhodes read National Geographic and dreamed of visiting the places in the pictures someday. Earlier this year, when a company transfer landed him in Utah, Rhodes looked forward to seeing the Great Salt Lake he had read about in the magazine. Now he wonders what all the excitement was about. "It's something I always wanted to see, but it's disappointing," Rhodes said. The view is hardly enticing.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2002 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Victoria's Secret, the glossy retailer of lingerie, took on the owner of a Kentucky strip mall store named Victor's Secret in the Supreme Court on Tuesday in a legal battle that could determine the value accorded to world-famous brand names. "If 'Rolls-Royce' were put on 100 different products, it would no longer stand for anything special," said Washington attorney Walter Dellinger, who represents Victoria's Secret.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi
For 90 tense minutes last month, Sheriff Mike Lacy in Utah tried to prevent yet another person connected to the theft of Native American artifacts from committing suicide. Two defendants had already taken their own lives after federal authorities charged 24 people in June with looting Native American sites in the West. Now a despondent relative of a third defendant had called Lacy. The sheriff of San Juan County kept the caller on the phone until deputies could arrive and make sure everything was OK. But there was still another suicide to come.
TRAVEL
April 20, 2008 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
"Most of what follows is true." That's the opening of "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid," the 1969 movie about two bandits born as the sun was setting over the mesas and buttes of the old Wild West. Morally ambiguous, the movie struck a chord with Vietnam War-era audiences who stood and cheered when Paul Newman as Butch and Robert Redford as Sundance met a hail of bullets in a dusty Bolivian town, etching the final freeze frame onto my 15-year-old heart.
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