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NEWS
January 15, 2000 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Department of Energy unveiled a complex plan Friday to return 84,000 acres of land to the Ute Tribe and start the cleanup of a notorious uranium mine in Utah whose radioactive waste has been polluting the Colorado River for a decade. The deal, announced by Energy Secretary Bill Richardson at Moab, Utah, constitutes the largest-ever voluntary return of public land to Native Americans in the lower 48 states.
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NEWS
January 15, 2000 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Department of Energy unveiled a complex plan Friday to return 84,000 acres of land to the Ute Tribe and start the cleanup of a notorious uranium mine in Utah whose radioactive waste has been polluting the Colorado River for a decade. The deal, announced by Energy Secretary Bill Richardson at Moab, Utah, constitutes the largest-ever voluntary return of public land to Native Americans in the lower 48 states.
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NEWS
November 7, 2008
Ute hunters: An article in Monday's Section A about the Southern Ute Indians exercising their right to hunt on public land in Colorado under an 1874 treaty said that the Utes would receive 5% of the state's licenses for hunting rare game such as bighorn sheep and moose. In fact, the state has no licensing authority over the tribe. The Utes will issue their own rare-game licenses in a number that equals 5% of the state's licenses for the area.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2001 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Summer travelers who love the water don't just gravitate to hotel swimming pools and the beach. Many also visit hot mineral springs at spas and resorts, where business booms in summer despite the heat. Those who visit the springs are hoping to relax, reduce stress and find other benefits. The dissolved solids in hot springs can include sulfur, calcium bicarbonate, sodium bicarbonate and other substances, each credited with particular health benefits.
TRAVEL
June 5, 2005 | Maggie Barnett, Times Staff Writer
PICTURE petroglyphs on a weeklong Southwestern photography and archeology tour. The Oct. 16 excursion, led by photographer Bruce Hukco and research archeologist Scott Ortman, will travel from Cortez, Colo., to Utah, where the group will visit Canyonlands National Park, Beef Basin, Moab and Arches National Park. "Even if people are familiar with the area, they'll get a whole new look at it," said Theresa Titone of the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center.
NATIONAL
August 10, 2013 | By Jenny Deam
Holding back time is a big job. But out here in the high mountain desert, where rattlesnakes and sagebrush outnumber people, it is a task Dean Coombs shoulders each week with a certain glee. Tuesday is press day at the Saguache Crescent, now in its 134th year. Coombs is the disheveled guy hunkered down amid the dust and dilapidation of the newspaper's office, hunting and pecking at the keyboard of the same Linotype machine his grandparents used when Warren G. Harding was in the White House.
TRAVEL
September 24, 1989 | TOM JENKINS, Jenkins is a free-lance writer living in Englewood, Colo
For an all-too-short time in late September and early October the high mountain slopes and valleys of Colorado are ablaze with gold and copper and burnt orange. The aspen trees are performing their simple miracle of changing color. It is an exultant time for the eyes, a festival for the camera lens. You can walk among the aspens and watch the sunlight suffuse the leaves with a golden aura.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1994 | ROBERT WELLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
This town supplied the uranium that produced the bombs that ended World War II and fueled the Cold War nuclear arsenal. But the three generations that grew up here remember it only as a great place to live. Soon, bulldozers will scrape the former community of 1,000 off the face of the Earth. Road maps no longer show it. ZIP code 81436 has been reassigned. Sure, kids used to play in the radioactive tailings from the uranium mines at the remote sandstone-rimmed spot on the San Miguel River.
SPORTS
February 5, 2002 | JOHN SCHULIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you could ignore the grime on the collar of his ruffled shirt, Pappy Jack's middleweight dressed like Sugar Ray Robinson, which wasn't something you saw every day in the Salt Lake City I remember. It was even whiter than it is now, and Pappy Jack's middleweight enhanced his exotic image with long cars and a missing thumb, the one he lost in a prison brawl.
TRAVEL
May 29, 1988 | BETTY MARTIN, Martin is a former copy editor for The Times Travel Section
Less than 20 miles west of the gaudy frenzy of Fremont Street and the Strip is an oasis of such spectacular scenery and contrast that you'll find it difficult to that believe the armada of slots and gaming tables is so near. Odds are you may never have heard of it. If you're like most visitors to this city, you head straight for the hotel, check into your room and dash to the casino.
TRAVEL
January 3, 2010 | By Elizabeth Mehren
In skiing, as in marriage, spousal roles are defined, distinct -- and often at odds. He thinks "whiteout" is code for no one on the slopes and plenty of fresh powder. She views a blizzard as a good reason to stay inside and read a book. He thinks equipment should be purchased solely for function. She bought her last three sets of skis (and several rounds of boots and helmets) because she liked the color. He maintains that if you've found a good resort, a place you know so well you could shoot the chutes in your sleep, why wouldn't you go back there forever?
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