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NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
This is part of a series of posts on food photography , sharing some of the tips and tricks we use here at The Times. We received a number of great questions from readers, which we will answer in upcoming posts. One of the more frequent questions I receive is how we make food look appealing and appetizing. There are a lot of ways to manipulate both the food and the viewer's eye. It really depends on the dish itself and what we are trying to convey. Often, we rely on props.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Noelle Carter
This is part of a series of posts on food photography , sharing some of the tips and tricks we use here at The Times. We received a number of great questions from readers, which we will answer in upcoming posts. One of the more frequent questions I receive is how we make food look appealing and appetizing. There are a lot of ways to manipulate both the food and the viewer's eye. It really depends on the dish itself and what we are trying to convey. Often, we rely on props.
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FOOD
May 3, 1990 | MINNIE BERNARDINO
Kitchen utensils are striding boldly into the Nineties, confident of their abilities, targeting tasks and markets like sharpshooters in a video arcade. The Gourmet Show, a trade event that specializes in springing gourmet gadgets on the world, unveiled the wonders on this page in San Francisco last month. Pay attention to these machines. They say the Nineties are going to be theirs.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
The discussion over minute details at a Manhattan Beach hotel ballroom seemed endless: Is the ink chamber filled with a pump, a button or an eyedropper? Was the pen exposed to heat or humidity, which darkens its color and decreases its value? For the 25th year, the Los Angeles International Pen Show convened Thursday, with about 1,200 exhibitors and collectors expected to gather at the local Marriott hotel. On Sunday, the last day, the show opens to the public for $7 at the door.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2011 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles times
First the Republicans took over the House. Now it's the cafeterias. Republicans say the use of "compostable" cups and utensils, a key part of former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's Green the Capitol initiative, was "neither cost-effective nor energy-efficient. " So they brought back plastic utensils and foam cups, ditching the eco-friendly dining wares of the Democratic era. The replacement spoons, knives, forks and cups are creating quite a stir, dividing lawmakers largely along party lines.
TRAVEL
November 25, 2001
With intensified airport scrutiny for the smallest metal objects that might be used as weapons, I recently was startled by the cellophane-wrapped utensils that came with the meals on two United flights I took. They included a tiny plastic knife that bent double when used to cut nearly anything and a full-size metal fork that I think could be as deadly as the box cutters the terrorists allegedly used. When I mentioned this to the flight attendant, she nodded, shrugged and said she had thought the same thing.
FOOD
June 30, 1999 | JENNIFER LOWE
Last time we accidentally smashed our Krups coffee carafe into the counter, it took a time-consuming trip to the mall to find a replacement. With Culinary Parts Unlimited, (http://www.culinaryparts.com), our search took just a few clicks, and the rest was up to the package deliverer. In business since 1976, Culinary Parts stocks bits and pieces for 30 brands of small appliances, from Cuisinart to Mr. Coffee. Our carafe cost what we would have paid at the mall, but even the $6.
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
I've been sorting my bookshelves and turned up this gem the other day: “Calder at Home” with photographs and text by Pedro E. Guerrero (Stewart, Tabori & Chang). That would be Alexander “Sandy” Calder, the American artist who is best known for his kinetic steel sculptures. As an impoverished artist in Paris in the 1920s, he designed toys, made wire portraits and, famously, created a traveling toy circus that he stashed in a series of suitcases. He was also handy around the house and, according to Guerrero, liked to make kitchen utensils whenever his wife Louisa needed something.
FOOD
January 10, 1985 | FERN STORER, Storer is a former food editor of the Cincinnati Post
"I know you've done a roundup of the most useful microwave cooking utensils and accessories before, but I didn't have a microwave oven then. Don't you think it's time for a review?" Obviously, this query was from a new owner. Yes, we think it's time. These are mostly items that have survived in my own kitchen through more than 10 years of microwave cooking--the ones left after many have been tried and discarded. You'll undoubtedly have many of these.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Fatty corn dogs and sugary coffee cake may become extinct in thousands of school cafeterias nationwide under a landmark new alliance among Los Angeles Unified and five other major urban school districts to leverage their vast purchasing power for healthier fare and lower prices. School districts in L.A., New York, Chicago, Dallas, Miami and Orlando, Fla., plan to announce Thursday efforts to use their collective clout - 2.5 million daily meals served and $530 million annually spent - to make wholesome food a national standard.
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
I've been sorting my bookshelves and turned up this gem the other day: “Calder at Home” with photographs and text by Pedro E. Guerrero (Stewart, Tabori & Chang). That would be Alexander “Sandy” Calder, the American artist who is best known for his kinetic steel sculptures. As an impoverished artist in Paris in the 1920s, he designed toys, made wire portraits and, famously, created a traveling toy circus that he stashed in a series of suitcases. He was also handy around the house and, according to Guerrero, liked to make kitchen utensils whenever his wife Louisa needed something.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2011 | Matt Stevens
After nearly two years of planning, prodding and debate, a group of Pasadena residents finally got its big wish: The city let them permanently stick their 18-foot fork in the road. "It's not going anywhere," said a triumphant Phil Coombes, who has been part of the so-called Fork in the Road Gang since its inception. Last month, about 10 dedicated friends resurrected the enormous wooden utensil on the median that splits Saint John and Pasadena avenues. With a handful of enthusiastic locals cheering them on, the developers cemented the guerrilla art into "fork plaza" more than a year after the California Transportation Authority forced them to carry it away.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2011 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles times
First the Republicans took over the House. Now it's the cafeterias. Republicans say the use of "compostable" cups and utensils, a key part of former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's Green the Capitol initiative, was "neither cost-effective nor energy-efficient. " So they brought back plastic utensils and foam cups, ditching the eco-friendly dining wares of the Democratic era. The replacement spoons, knives, forks and cups are creating quite a stir, dividing lawmakers largely along party lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2009 | Nicole Santa Cruz
Pasadena has a fork in the road. And it's 18 feet tall. Where south St. John and south Pasadena avenues divide, there's a towering wooden silver fork in the traffic median. The utensil has a black steel skeleton and is rooted in 2 1/2 feet of concrete. The art was originally intended as a surprise for Bob Stane of Altadena, who celebrated his 75th birthday Oct. 29. But Caltrans, which owns the median, and Pasadena, which maintains the land, are deciding whether to keep it up for a while as an impromptu piece of street art. "It was just the best birthday present I've ever had," said Stane, who owns the Coffee Gallery Backstage, a coffeehouse and showroom in Altadena, with the fork's artist, Ken Marshall.
MAGAZINE
June 18, 2006 | S. Irene Virbila, S. Irene Virbila is The Times' restaurant critic. She has been recognized by the Assn. of Food Journalists and the James Beard Foundation for best restaurant criticism.
SOUP SPOON Italian wedding soup Young Hollywood heads to the old Rat Pack hangout Dominick's for comforting dishes such as Italian wedding soup, a rich poultry broth with swatches of emerald greens and shreds of egg bobbing with perfect little meatballs from chef Brandon Boudet. The setting, complete with cozy bar, walls covered in vintage black-and-white photos and a seductive walled patio with an outdoor fireplace, feels like Greenwich Village in the 1950s. Dominick's, 8715 Beverly Blvd.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1996 | MARLA DICKERSON
Speaking of food faux pas, the silverware and real dinner plates are back at the Cafe Orleans and French Market Restaurant after diners there raised a stink about the plastic utensils foisted upon them a few months back. "It was a 45-day experiment that didn't work," said Michael Berry, vice president of Disneyland food operations. "Our guests didn't like it, so we put it back." Look for the menus of the French-themed restaurants to improve as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1986 | ZAN DUBIN
To a casual observer, the ceramic bowls, bamboo scoops and iron kettles may look merely like props for a simple tea party. But the centuries-old, Japanese tea utensils and related artworks on view at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center mean much more. The delicate implements, revered by the Japanese as artworks, are integral to chanoyu, the traditional "way of tea" ceremony, and represent an ancient aesthetic, a social code and evolved spiritual ideals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2005 | Valerie Reitman, Times Staff Writer
They brought their pots, whisks, cheese graters, silver goblets, tea kettles and cutlery through the Pico-Robertson neighborhood in Los Angeles. They transported the utensils by box, shopping cart, laundry basket, suitcase and stroller.
HOME & GARDEN
June 12, 2003 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
A wooden spoon can be a beautiful thing. A "whole-wheat-bagel-and-cream-cheese knife" made out of chocolate lacewood can be an exquisite thing. And a "two-cheese-pizza sauce spreader" out of figured lemonwood or a "Heinz 57 ketchup starter" from gnarled canary wood? Well, before getting carried away with ourselves, let's push out of mind the coarse, spiritless wood implements that dominate retail offerings in kitchenware, such as they are.
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