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October 2, 2002 | From a Times Staff Writer
California teachers appear to have a 51% higher rate of breast cancer and a 72% higher rate of uterine cancer than women in the general population, according to a study by California scientists. The teachers have lower rates of lung and cervical cancers. But the profession of teaching is very unlikely to be the cause, said Dr. Ronald K. Ross, chair of preventive medicine at USC and one of the study's researchers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
For nearly two decades, Barbara Garnaus maintained a modest, delicate life balance: keeping her part-time Orange County school district job and juggling her bills and credit card debt. Now 63, living alone, she counts every dollar, has no cellphone and commutes an hour in traffic so she can keep an affordable apartment in Laguna Woods. Having good health helped. Garnaus got by without medical insurance, relying on yearly exams at a free clinic. But that changed last year: Garnaus now needs treatment for cancer, and she bought insurance under Obamacare.
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NEWS
February 13, 1987
Government doctors reported that women who take birth control pills for at least a year gain lasting protection against the most common kind of uterine cancer. The conclusion by researchers for the federal Centers for Disease Control complements earlier reports that oral contraceptives provide protection against ovarian cancer and do not cause breast cancer, contrary to popular fears.
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Breast cancer survivors needn't worry about eating soy, according to a new study presented at the American Assn. for Cancer Research in Orlando this week. Fears that the isoflavone chemicals found in soy -- which have estrogen-like properties -- might raise the risk of cancer recurrence seem unfounded. The conclusion comes from a large study compiling data from more than 18,000 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer; an average of nine years after diagnosis, no statistical difference was seen between groups of women who ate a lot of soy and those who ate very little, both with regard to either recurrence of the cancers or death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1986 | From Associated Press
New estrogen-releasing skin patches may provide a safer way for women to take the hormone to relieve the side effects of menopause and other problems of aging, California researchers say. The patches steadily release estrogen through the skin when stuck onto the abdomen. They must be replaced twice a week. Researchers at UCLA say the patches appear to reduce the chance of side effects of estrogen therapy that result from the impact of the hormone on the liver.
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | From Associated Press
A noted cancer researcher accused of scientific wrongdoing has been vindicated. "This now permits me to go more full steam," Dr. Bernard Fisher said Thursday. "We have so much data that is just sitting there waiting to be looked at and studied and analyzed." The University of Pittsburgh apologized for removing him as director of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project in 1994 after he was accused of being too slow in revealing problems in the study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
For nearly two decades, Barbara Garnaus maintained a modest, delicate life balance: keeping her part-time Orange County school district job and juggling her bills and credit card debt. Now 63, living alone, she counts every dollar, has no cellphone and commutes an hour in traffic so she can keep an affordable apartment in Laguna Woods. Having good health helped. Garnaus got by without medical insurance, relying on yearly exams at a free clinic. But that changed last year: Garnaus now needs treatment for cancer, and she bought insurance under Obamacare.
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Breast cancer survivors needn't worry about eating soy, according to a new study presented at the American Assn. for Cancer Research in Orlando this week. Fears that the isoflavone chemicals found in soy -- which have estrogen-like properties -- might raise the risk of cancer recurrence seem unfounded. The conclusion comes from a large study compiling data from more than 18,000 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer; an average of nine years after diagnosis, no statistical difference was seen between groups of women who ate a lot of soy and those who ate very little, both with regard to either recurrence of the cancers or death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Eating more soy products, such as tofu and soy milk, or legumes can reduce the risk of cancer of the uterus, researchers reported Wednesday in the American Journal of Epidemiology. The report adds to a growing body of evidence that phytoestrogens--substances resembling human hormones that are found in plants--can be beneficial to health. Marc Goodman and colleagues at the Cancer Research Center of Hawaii studied 332 women who contracted cancer of the uterus from 1985 to 1993.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration approved Thursday the use of tamoxifen as the first drug to prevent breast cancer in healthy women at very high risk of developing the disease. But the drug, which has long been a potent treatment for already diagnosed breast cancer, can have potentially serious side effects.
SCIENCE
October 2, 2002 | From a Times Staff Writer
California teachers appear to have a 51% higher rate of breast cancer and a 72% higher rate of uterine cancer than women in the general population, according to a study by California scientists. The teachers have lower rates of lung and cervical cancers. But the profession of teaching is very unlikely to be the cause, said Dr. Ronald K. Ross, chair of preventive medicine at USC and one of the study's researchers.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration approved Thursday the use of tamoxifen as the first drug to prevent breast cancer in healthy women at very high risk of developing the disease. But the drug, which has long been a potent treatment for already diagnosed breast cancer, can have potentially serious side effects.
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | From Associated Press
A noted cancer researcher accused of scientific wrongdoing has been vindicated. "This now permits me to go more full steam," Dr. Bernard Fisher said Thursday. "We have so much data that is just sitting there waiting to be looked at and studied and analyzed." The University of Pittsburgh apologized for removing him as director of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project in 1994 after he was accused of being too slow in revealing problems in the study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Eating more soy products, such as tofu and soy milk, or legumes can reduce the risk of cancer of the uterus, researchers reported Wednesday in the American Journal of Epidemiology. The report adds to a growing body of evidence that phytoestrogens--substances resembling human hormones that are found in plants--can be beneficial to health. Marc Goodman and colleagues at the Cancer Research Center of Hawaii studied 332 women who contracted cancer of the uterus from 1985 to 1993.
NEWS
February 13, 1987
Government doctors reported that women who take birth control pills for at least a year gain lasting protection against the most common kind of uterine cancer. The conclusion by researchers for the federal Centers for Disease Control complements earlier reports that oral contraceptives provide protection against ovarian cancer and do not cause breast cancer, contrary to popular fears.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1986 | From Associated Press
New estrogen-releasing skin patches may provide a safer way for women to take the hormone to relieve the side effects of menopause and other problems of aging, California researchers say. The patches steadily release estrogen through the skin when stuck onto the abdomen. They must be replaced twice a week. Researchers at UCLA say the patches appear to reduce the chance of side effects of estrogen therapy that result from the impact of the hormone on the liver.
SCIENCE
June 19, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II and Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writers
Gastric bypass surgery -- a treatment for obesity that is already known to reduce heart disease and diabetes -- decreases the incidence of cancer by 80% over the five years following the procedure, Canadian researchers reported Wednesday. The incidence of two of the most common tumors, breast and colon, was reduced by 85% and 70%, respectively, Dr. Nicolas Christou of McGill University in Montreal said.
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