Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUterine Fibroids
IN THE NEWS

Uterine Fibroids

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
October 23, 2004 | From Reuters
A new device to treat uterine fibroids -- fibrous clumps that can cause miscarriages, painful menstruation and other related problems in women -- won U.S. regulatory approval Friday. The system, developed by InSightec, a unit of Israel-based Elbit Medical Imaging, uses ultrasound waves to break up the clumps and could be an alternative to the removal of a uterus, or hysterectomy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
October 23, 2004 | From Reuters
A new device to treat uterine fibroids -- fibrous clumps that can cause miscarriages, painful menstruation and other related problems in women -- won U.S. regulatory approval Friday. The system, developed by InSightec, a unit of Israel-based Elbit Medical Imaging, uses ultrasound waves to break up the clumps and could be an alternative to the removal of a uterus, or hysterectomy.
Advertisement
HEALTH
June 11, 2001 | SHARI ROAN
SEX, LIES & THE TRUTH ABOUT UTERINE FIBROIDS: A Journey From Diagnosis to Treatment to Renewed Good Health By Carla Dionne Avery 316 pages $14.95 paperback * Carla Dionne wasn't just borrowing a catchy phrase when she titled her book "Sex, Lies & the Truth About Uterine Fibroids." There is good reason for the title, as she explains and documents. Dionne is the executive director of the Camarillo-based National Uterine Fibroids Foundation.
HEALTH
March 29, 2004 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Uterine fibroids may be benign, but they're far from harmless. These tumors, growing inside a woman's uterus, can be as small as a pea or as large as a melon. They can cause cramps, bloating, pain during intercourse, miscarriages and vaginal bleeding so heavy that it can lead to anemia. Many sufferers feel the urge to urinate frequently, even in the middle of the night, because the fibroids press against their bladders.
HEALTH
February 9, 1998 | RIDGELY OCHS, NEWSDAY
Uterine fibroids, also called leiomyomas, myomas or fibromas, are rubbery nodules that begin as irregular cells in the muscular layers of the uterus. Benign growths, they affect up to a quarter of all women younger than 50, especially women in their 30s and 40s. They usually grow slowly and erratically into smooth muscle bound by fibrous connective tissue, varying in size from a pinhead to a watermelon.
HEALTH
March 12, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A minimally invasive procedure that starves uterine fibroids by depriving them of their blood supply is more effective than surgery at reducing bleeding and other symptoms, according to Stanford researchers. As many as 25% of all women have such fibroids, benign tumors that grow in the uterus. Most women have no symptoms and never know the tumors are there, but for some women, the fibroids can cause excessive bleeding, pelvic pain and pressure, urinary urgency and abdominal swelling.
HEALTH
March 29, 2004 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Uterine fibroids may be benign, but they're far from harmless. These tumors, growing inside a woman's uterus, can be as small as a pea or as large as a melon. They can cause cramps, bloating, pain during intercourse, miscarriages and vaginal bleeding so heavy that it can lead to anemia. Many sufferers feel the urge to urinate frequently, even in the middle of the night, because the fibroids press against their bladders.
HEALTH
February 9, 1998 | RIDGELY OCHS, NEWSDAY
Three years ago, Allyn Mulligan, then 44, went for a routine physical. During her internal exam, the doctor told her she had a benign fibroid tumor the size of a grapefruit growing on the wall of her uterus. Although her periods were heavy--which can be a symptom of large or benign fibroids--the bleeding didn't bother her.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2010
Early Show Sgt. Matthew Flemister. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Speed skater Katherine Reutter; Rodrigo y Gabriela performs. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America Martin Scorsese; Dana Delany. (N) 7 a.m. KABC Tiger Woods The golfer speaks to friends, fans and reporters. 8 a.m. CNN; Fox News; ESPN; Golf and most major broadcasters. Live With Regis and Kelly Ewan McGregor ("The Ghost Writer"). (N) 9 a.m. KABC The View Bernadette Peters; David Frei.
HEALTH
November 11, 2002 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Heavy menstrual periods are more than an inconvenience. They exact a significant economic toll. American women who suffer severe bleeding and cramping miss nearly a month of work and lose work time valued at nearly $1,700, on average, each year, researchers report in the first attempt to quantify the financial impact. Dr. David Cumming, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Alberta in Canada, analyzed data from nearly 2,800 U.S.
HEALTH
June 11, 2001 | SHARI ROAN
SEX, LIES & THE TRUTH ABOUT UTERINE FIBROIDS: A Journey From Diagnosis to Treatment to Renewed Good Health By Carla Dionne Avery 316 pages $14.95 paperback * Carla Dionne wasn't just borrowing a catchy phrase when she titled her book "Sex, Lies & the Truth About Uterine Fibroids." There is good reason for the title, as she explains and documents. Dionne is the executive director of the Camarillo-based National Uterine Fibroids Foundation.
HEALTH
March 12, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A minimally invasive procedure that starves uterine fibroids by depriving them of their blood supply is more effective than surgery at reducing bleeding and other symptoms, according to Stanford researchers. As many as 25% of all women have such fibroids, benign tumors that grow in the uterus. Most women have no symptoms and never know the tumors are there, but for some women, the fibroids can cause excessive bleeding, pelvic pain and pressure, urinary urgency and abdominal swelling.
HEALTH
February 9, 1998 | RIDGELY OCHS, NEWSDAY
Uterine fibroids, also called leiomyomas, myomas or fibromas, are rubbery nodules that begin as irregular cells in the muscular layers of the uterus. Benign growths, they affect up to a quarter of all women younger than 50, especially women in their 30s and 40s. They usually grow slowly and erratically into smooth muscle bound by fibrous connective tissue, varying in size from a pinhead to a watermelon.
HEALTH
February 9, 1998 | RIDGELY OCHS, NEWSDAY
Three years ago, Allyn Mulligan, then 44, went for a routine physical. During her internal exam, the doctor told her she had a benign fibroid tumor the size of a grapefruit growing on the wall of her uterus. Although her periods were heavy--which can be a symptom of large or benign fibroids--the bleeding didn't bother her.
HEALTH
November 6, 2000 | SALLY SQUIRES, WASHINGTON POST
Women who want permanent--and foolproof--contraception now must turn to sterilization, which requires surgery, and sometimes general anesthesia, plus a few days of recovery. But an experimental technique could soon allow women to be sterilized without going under the knife, receiving general anesthesia or even being sidelined. Called STOP (selective tubal occlusion procedure), the procedure is performed vaginally and requires no incision.
HEALTH
March 11, 2002
EDUCATION TUESDAY * Gastrointestinal cancer program, led by an oncologist-gastroenterologist, will focus on prevention, detection, treatment and family history. UCLA, RPB Auditorium (adjacent to Jules Stein Eye Institute), Los Angeles. 7-9 p.m. Free, but parking is $6. (310) 794-6644. WEDNESDAY * "Determining Cognitive Capacity," led by the director of the neuropsychological services program.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|