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NEWS
September 21, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
A Florida woman with a double uterus managed a 1-in-5-million feat, according to her doctor: She gave birth to twins -- one from each uterus. Andreea Barbosa, 24, gave birth to Nathan and Natalie last week. She and her husband conceived the twins without reproductive medicine or extra effort, according to the St. Petersburg Times. Roughly one in 2,000 women has what's called uterus didelphys, said Barbosa's obstetrician, Dr. Patricia St. John. It happens when the two small tubes that join to form the uterus end up growing into separate structures, according to the Mayo Clinic.
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OPINION
October 20, 2012
Re "Red, blue and faithful," Opinion, Oct. 16 Jonah Goldberg's partisanship shows through in his criticism of Vice President Joe Biden's heartfelt statement of his Roman Catholic faith in his opposition to abortion and in the separation of church and state, which precludes imposing that religious belief on all Americans. Goldberg claims Republican challenger Paul Ryan's professed belief that human life begins at conception (and thus abortion should be a crime at any stage)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2008 | Jean-Paul Renaud
The Board of Supervisors agreed Tuesday to pay a $437,000 settlement after doctors at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center removed a woman's uterus without her consent. Engrid Lewis was admitted to the public hospital in September 2006, suffering from fibroid tissue in her uterus, according to the settlement papers. Doctors gave her a range of options, including removal of her uterus. Lewis chose to have the affected tissue excised without removing her uterus. "While the county will argue that the proper medical treatment was to remove the patient's uterus, plaintiff will argue that the removal of her uterus was against her wishes," according to a case summary.
NEWS
September 21, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
A Florida woman with a double uterus managed a 1-in-5-million feat, according to her doctor: She gave birth to twins -- one from each uterus. Andreea Barbosa, 24, gave birth to Nathan and Natalie last week. She and her husband conceived the twins without reproductive medicine or extra effort, according to the St. Petersburg Times. Roughly one in 2,000 women has what's called uterus didelphys, said Barbosa's obstetrician, Dr. Patricia St. John. It happens when the two small tubes that join to form the uterus end up growing into separate structures, according to the Mayo Clinic.
MAGAZINE
June 16, 1991
I devoured with relish Ruth Reichl's "Dishing." I was, however, desolate to learn that I would have to travel all the way to Pomona for a decent pig's uterus. LINDA L. FARKAS Northridge
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | United Press International
An elephant that recently underwent a historic Cesarean section was destroyed Friday night when veterinarians determined a raging infection was incurable, said officials at the San Diego Wild Animal Park. Veterinary surgeons operated on Jean again when the animal did not respond to treatment. They discovered a ruptured uterus and a severe infection. When surgeons were unable to remove the uterus, they decided to give the elephant a lethal dose of anesthetic.
NEWS
July 31, 1985 | United Press International
Health and Human Services Secretary Margaret M. Heckler underwent surgery Tuesday for removal of her uterus and was described by her doctor as being in "excellent" condition, an aide said. Heckler will remain in the hospital for a few days and then recuperate at home, the aide said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1996
How is it that so many laypeople have become medical experts since the debate over the grossly labeled "partial-birth abortion" began? The Times printed a letter from a gentleman who said, "There is no situation in which partial-birth abortion is necessary to permit future childbearing" (May 30). Perhaps this individual and others like him could read about the risks of having a Caesarean section before the uterus has expanded, when the doctor has to cut through a thick wall of tissue.
OPINION
January 14, 1990
At the present time the controversy between pro-abortionists and anti-abortionists seems insoluble. I believe, however, that I have a solution. Embryo transplant using in-vitro fertilization has become a reality in animal husbandry, especially in cows. If a similar technique could be found enabling a fetus to be transferred from the uterus of a woman who means to abort it (murder it, as a pro-lifer put it), to another uterus of a woman who would save it from its impending murder--why lo!
NEWS
September 4, 1997 | THE WASHINGTON POST
Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted infection caused by a bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis. * More than 4 million Americans are infected annually, most of them sexually active adolescents and young adults. * Most men with chlamydia have a burning sensation while urinating or a discharge from the penis; some men have no symptoms. * In men, infection sometimes spreads to the epididymis (a tube that carries sperm from the testis), causing pain and fever.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Move over, birth control pill. Doctors are throwing their support behind intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants as the most effective forms of reversible birth control, in a new set of guidelines for obstetricians and gynecologists.   Though the two forms of contraception aren’t as widely used as birth control pills, doctors said that partly has to do with past fears about their safety—and that new types of IUDs are quite safe. The new suggestions guiding their use are published online in the July Obstetrics and Gynecology . Here’s a quick look at how the birth control methods work: IUDs are plastic, T-shaped devices inserted in the uterus that release either copper or a hormone into the uterus.
HEALTH
March 23, 2009 | Marc Siegel, Siegel is an internist and an associate professor of medicine at New York University's School of Medicine.
"House" Fox, Feb. 23, 8 p.m. Episode: "The Softer Side." -- The premise Jackson, born with male and female DNA, has been brought up as a boy after his parents opted for surgical repair of his "ambiguous genitalia" shortly after birth. Now 13, he's recently begun receiving testosterone shots. After he collapses with abdominal pain while playing basketball, his parents urge Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2008 | Jean-Paul Renaud
The Board of Supervisors agreed Tuesday to pay a $437,000 settlement after doctors at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center removed a woman's uterus without her consent. Engrid Lewis was admitted to the public hospital in September 2006, suffering from fibroid tissue in her uterus, according to the settlement papers. Doctors gave her a range of options, including removal of her uterus. Lewis chose to have the affected tissue excised without removing her uterus. "While the county will argue that the proper medical treatment was to remove the patient's uterus, plaintiff will argue that the removal of her uterus was against her wishes," according to a case summary.
SCIENCE
January 20, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A New York hospital is seeking to conduct the nation's first uterus transplant, a procedure intended to allow women without a womb or with an impaired womb to bear children. The wombs would come from dead donors, as most organs do, and would be removed after recipients gave birth so they would not need lifetime anti-rejection drugs. The hospital's ethics board has conditionally approved the plans. However, the hospital's president said a transplant was not expected "anytime in the near future."
HEALTH
November 13, 2006 | From Times wire reports
Heavy smokers are less likely to become pregnant through IVF treatment, even with donated eggs, fertility experts have found. Smoking more than 10 cigarettes a day, they said, makes the womb less receptive to the embryo and reduces the odds that it will implant and result in a pregnancy. Smoking has been known to affect a woman's fertility, but Dr.
HEALTH
August 15, 2005 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
Even as doctors and women's advocates increasingly question the need for many of the nation's hysterectomies, researchers have found that the procedure may be more dangerous than was thought. Not only does the routine removal of the ovaries during a hysterectomy have no clear health benefit, they say, it actually raises the risk of death from heart disease and hip fracture.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Move over, birth control pill. Doctors are throwing their support behind intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants as the most effective forms of reversible birth control, in a new set of guidelines for obstetricians and gynecologists.   Though the two forms of contraception aren’t as widely used as birth control pills, doctors said that partly has to do with past fears about their safety—and that new types of IUDs are quite safe. The new suggestions guiding their use are published online in the July Obstetrics and Gynecology . Here’s a quick look at how the birth control methods work: IUDs are plastic, T-shaped devices inserted in the uterus that release either copper or a hormone into the uterus.
HEALTH
August 15, 2005 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
Even as doctors and women's advocates increasingly question the need for many of the nation's hysterectomies, researchers have found that the procedure may be more dangerous than was thought. Not only does the routine removal of the ovaries during a hysterectomy have no clear health benefit, they say, it actually raises the risk of death from heart disease and hip fracture.
OPINION
May 16, 2004 | Barbara Ehrenreich, Barbara Ehrenreich is the author, most recently, of "Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America."
Even those people we might have thought were impervious to shame, like the secretary of Defense, admit that the photos of abuse in Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison turned their stomachs. The photos did something else to me, as a feminist: They broke my heart. I had no illusions about the U.S. mission in Iraq -- whatever exactly it is -- but it turns out that I did have some illusions about women. Of the seven U.S. soldiers now charged with sickening forms of abuse in Abu Ghraib, three are women: Spc.
SCIENCE
July 5, 2003 | Allison M. Heinrichs, Times Staff Writer
Mice with transplanted wombs have successfully carried to term and given birth to normal babies, Swedish doctors and scientists reported, boosting hopes that women who have had their uterus removed could receive a transplant and give birth to healthy children. The births mark the first time an animal with a transplanted uterus has produced live offspring, Sahlgrenska University team leader Dr.
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