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NEWS
August 11, 2001 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California may be facing a persistent, escalating glut of electricity as a result of its buying too much power through long-term contracts, according to energy experts and a Los Angeles Times analysis. The surplus, projected to peak in 2004, could pose a costly burden to ratepayers unless electricity demand rises substantially, according to The Times' analysis, which reviewed the state's power purchases and projections for demand over the next several years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2011 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
The state Senate acted Thursday to require California utilities to boost their use of wind, solar and other renewable energy sources to a third of total supply by the year 2020. California law already requires utilities to get a fifth of their power from renewable energy. If this measure becomes law, utilities will be forced to lean even more heavily on green power ? improving air quality and helping the economy in the process, supporters said. "Right now we can begin to create the jobs that this state so desperately needs," said state Sen. Joe Simitian (D-Palo Alto)
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NEWS
June 15, 2001 | MARLA DICKERSON and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the back of a dingy duplex in South-Central Los Angeles, utility investigator John Foegen pulls two battered electric meters from their wall sockets and smiles. "Well looky here," he said with satisfaction, pointing a gloved finger at two thick strands of red wire jammed into the guts of the utility panel. Someone has helped himself to free electricity, using a hot-wiring technique that skirts the meter.
NEWS
March 23, 2002 | RONE TEMPEST and MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The year was 1998, and a mighty corporate sea change was gathering power inside an old ice rink in downtown Tulsa, Okla. Gone were the skaters. In their place were a bunch of amped-up electricity traders, equipped with top-of-the-line computers and the latest in meteorological technology. From behind their blinking consoles, they were ready to make money the new way: trading electrons in California's freshly deregulated energy market. The transformation of the rink by Tulsa-based Williams Cos.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Consumer Groups OK Low-Emission Vehicle Plans: Two of California's investor-owned utilities have reached a compromise with Toward Utility Rate Normalization and Utility Consumers Action Network over the utilities' proposals to support low-emission vehicles. The agreement was filed with the California Public Utilities Commission.
NEWS
August 13, 2001 | DIANE WEDNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judy Gertner was ecstatic over the all-electric Costa Mesa home she bought in 1979, with its extra-large electric water heater, electric appliances and electric radiant-heat system that gently warmed rooms according to individual thermostats. She was shocked, however, when her monthly electric bill rose to $200 in July.
NEWS
July 29, 2000 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's pioneering 4-year-old effort to deregulate the electricity market is increasingly being judged as a costly disappointment, or even a failure. Consumers, businesses, politicians and utility industry officials are proposing a patchwork of fixes for the state's $20-billion electricity industry--everything from retail and wholesale rate freezes to an outright dismantling of California's push into open competition.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2001 | Nancy Rivera Brooks
Negotiators for Gov. Gray Davis will continue talks this week to reach final agreements on the purchase of transmission lines from Southern California Edison, Pacific Gas & Electric and San Diego Gas & Electric as part of a rescue plan for the beleaguered utilities.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1998 | Nancy Rivera Brooks
Consumer activists trying to overturn parts of California's utility deregulation law said they delivered more than 700,000 signatures to county clerks around the state, well beyond the 433,000 needed to qualify for the November ballot. Now the county clerk's offices will check if the signatures are valid and will report to the secretary of state, who certifies ballot initiatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2001 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dimming lightbulbs to reduce the chances of blackouts? That's the latest concept being directed at energy-conscious Californians, who may be asked to accept that prospect to help stave off the wider damage that full-scale rolling blackouts could wreak this summer.
NEWS
March 12, 2002 | TIM REITERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California attorney general's office sued four major energy companies for $150 million Monday, alleging that they broke contracts to provide emergency power to the state's power grid operator and instead sold the electricity on the lucrative spot market on thousands of occasions. In many cases, the lawsuits allege, the state was forced to buy its emergency electricity from the costly spot market, paying a second time for the same power withheld in the first place by the energy companies.
NEWS
February 24, 2002 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an about-face, Gov. Gray Davis is expected to announce today that he will petition the federal government to overturn dozens of long-term electricity contracts signed by California at the height of the power crisis. Once heralded by Davis as the whip that tamed a wild electricity market, the long-term contracts lately have been attacked as too expensive by consumer advocates and lawmakers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2002 | TIM REITERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer filed a lawsuit Thursday against Pacific Gas & Electric Corp., the parent of PG&E Co., that seeks the return of as much as $4 billion Lockyer says was illegally siphoned from the state's largest utility, driving it into bankruptcy. The Superior Court suit alleges that PG&E Corp. violated agreements with state regulators that were designed to protect PG&E Co. and its Northern and Central California customers when the giant holding company was formed five years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2002 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what state officials called a "significant milestone" for California's year-old electricity crisis, power costs have fallen to the point that no public money was needed in November and December to pay for the electricity the state purchased on behalf of utility customers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2001 | MATEA GOLD and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Term limits and local elections transformed Los Angeles City Hall in 2001, while an energy crisis threatened California for months, only to be replaced by broader financial worries that promise to dominate Sacramento in early 2002. In Los Angeles' 2001, the electorate spent much of the year replacing its leaders. All three citywide elected officials got their jobs in 2001, as did a majority of City Council members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2001 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a year ago this month that the meltdown of California's deregulated energy market hit crisis stage. Gov. Gray Davis plugged in the official state Christmas tree last December, then had it turned off 30 minutes later as a message to Californians to go easy on the strained electricity grid. "Tonight while some Californians are going without power," the governor said at the time, "let the light in our hearts represent the true spirit of the season."
BUSINESS
June 30, 1995 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that anticipates deregulation of the state's utilities, Southern California Edison Co. said Thursday that it will form a unit to run its transmission operation--the network of high-voltage power lines that carry bulk power from generating plants to central distribution points. The move separates all aspects of Edison's transmission system--operation, planning, financial and other functions--from the existing Edison unit that controls power plants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2001 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anyone who tries to make a political issue of the electricity crisis will have trouble avoiding S. David Freeman. The energy veteran has held so many key jobs through California's deregulation debacle that he is now both sniper and target in the battle for the governor's office. When the crisis kicked up last year, Freeman was running Los Angeles' public utility under Mayor Richard Riordan, now the best-known Republican candidate for governor.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2001 | James Flanigan
California was the beginning of the end for Enron Corp. One of the company's first real failures in the marketplace occurred in California as electricity deregulation began in 1998. The big energy trading firm came barreling into California prepared to sell electricity to retail customers at lower prices than local companies could. Enron invested at least $250 million preparing to expand in California, including ads on the Super Bowl telecast in '98.
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