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NEWS
December 6, 1996 | Associated Press
The plug will be permanently pulled on the Connecticut Yankee nuclear power plant, the second-oldest reactor in the nation. The plant's board of directors voted unanimously Wednesday to close the Haddam Neck plant after nearly 29 years in service. The reactor, which was shut down in July because of safety concerns, had been licensed to operate until the year 2007. Safety problems did not factor into the decision to close the reactor, company officials said.
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NEWS
December 6, 1996 | Associated Press
The plug will be permanently pulled on the Connecticut Yankee nuclear power plant, the second-oldest reactor in the nation. The plant's board of directors voted unanimously Wednesday to close the Haddam Neck plant after nearly 29 years in service. The reactor, which was shut down in July because of safety concerns, had been licensed to operate until the year 2007. Safety problems did not factor into the decision to close the reactor, company officials said.
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BUSINESS
January 13, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
New England's largest electricity company, Connecticut-based Northeast Utilities, said Thursday it offered to acquire bankrupt Public Service Co. of New Hampshire in a plan valued at $2 billion. Analysts said the proposal, which put a higher price on the New Hampshire utility than the value determined by state regulators, could spark heated bidding between as many as 11 utilities.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
New England's largest electricity company, Connecticut-based Northeast Utilities, said Thursday it offered to acquire bankrupt Public Service Co. of New Hampshire in a plan valued at $2 billion. Analysts said the proposal, which put a higher price on the New Hampshire utility than the value determined by state regulators, could spark heated bidding between as many as 11 utilities.
REAL ESTATE
August 13, 1995
There is more to Dr. Mark McCartin's case and the EMF story ("High Tension" by Stephanie O'Neill, July 30) that deserves to be told. McCartin states in the article that he dropped the price on his home from $830,000 to $539,000 and still was not able to sell his home. In September, 1991, he filed a sworn statement with the Orange County assessor that his home was worth $570,000. Several months later, at McCartin's request, San Diego Gas & Electric Co. measured the EMF levels at his home, and McCartin began to express concern regarding power-line EMFs.
NEWS
September 29, 1985 | From Associated Press
Hurricane Gloria dealt a glancing blow to the East Coast on Friday, tearing down power lines and buckling boardwalks but causing less damage than expected before it rapidly weakened over New England. More than half a million people had fled what was once classified as one of the most dangerous Atlantic storms on record. The National Weather Service said in an 5 p.m. PDT bulletin that Gloria was no longer a hurricane, with highest winds clocked at 50 m.p.h.
NEWS
September 28, 1985 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writers
Hurricane Gloria, one of the largest and most feared storms of the century, spun up the East Coast through New England on Friday as more than half a million people fled its fury. But its damage, though substantial, was far less than predicted. More than 2 million customers were without power from North Carolina to Connecticut, thousands of trees and electrical lines were toppled and stock exchanges, businesses and Atlantic City's casinos were closed.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nuclear power in California and the nation has survived multibillion-dollar cost overruns, inefficiency, Three Mile Island and widespread public enmity--but can it survive the shock of having to compete on its own dubious economics? That rude awakening will soon confront the nuclear caretakers as a free market in energy takes over.
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