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Utilities Labor Unions

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1997 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles City Council panel approved a new labor pact with the Department of Water and Power's largest and most powerful union Thursday, agreeing to a buyout and severance package before the city embarks on unprecedented layoffs in the department. But the package, which is scheduled to be considered behind closed doors by the full council today, came under fire from one of the panel members, Councilman Joel Wachs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1997 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles City Council panel approved a new labor pact with the Department of Water and Power's largest and most powerful union Thursday, agreeing to a buyout and severance package before the city embarks on unprecedented layoffs in the department. But the package, which is scheduled to be considered behind closed doors by the full council today, came under fire from one of the panel members, Councilman Joel Wachs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1987 | ROBERT FAIRBANKS, Robert Fairbanks teaches journalism at California State University, Sacramento, and writes on state issues.
Given the Moriarty corruption scandal and all that it has done to besmirch California politicians, it is no wonder that honesty is big these days. Think, for instance, of how Assembly Speaker Willie Brown has made room on his leadership team for Assemblyman Thomas M. Hannigan (D-Fairfield), a man noted around the state Capitol for his personal integrity. But maybe things have gone too far.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
The Gulf of Mexico oil spill is spurring California legislators and conflicting interest groups to settle past differences and adopt the nation's toughest renewable energy law to reduce the state's dependence on oil and serve as a model for other states. The effort is supported by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who is eager to burnish his environmental legacy before leaving office in January even though he vetoed a similar bill last fall. Both the governor and the Democrats who control the Legislature want to require privately and publicly owned electric utilities to generate one-third of their power from wind, solar and other clean sources by 2020.
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