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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN and TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With California mired in energy troubles, Mayor Richard Riordan and his former power chief S. David Freeman trumpet the extraordinary fortune of Los Angeles: no rate hikes and no blackouts. Yet Riordan and Freeman have sullied their mutual success story by waging bitter campaigns to discredit each other--at first behind the scenes but now in public.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN and TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With California mired in energy troubles, Mayor Richard Riordan and his former power chief S. David Freeman trumpet the extraordinary fortune of Los Angeles: no rate hikes and no blackouts. Yet Riordan and Freeman have sullied their mutual success story by waging bitter campaigns to discredit each other--at first behind the scenes but now in public.
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BUSINESS
February 22, 1997 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edison International on Friday finally made its first detailed case to the Los Angeles City Council as to why it, and not Duke/Louis Dreyfus, should be the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's strategic partner. Speaking before a council subcommittee hearing, Edison Chief Executive John Bryson promised that his team of Edison and NGC Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2001 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles city officials moved quickly Friday to name an interim head of the Department of Water and Power to replace S. David Freeman, who disclosed earlier this week that he is taking a job overseeing state energy issues. David H. Wiggs Jr.--who has worked as a consultant on energy issues for a number of government officials--will hold the post as head of the city utility through September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1992 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Electricity was restored Sunday to more than 80% of South Los Angeles residents who had lost power, but 5,000 remained in the dark, keeping their food cold with dry ice and lighting rooms with candles and kerosene lamps. Department of Water and Power crews have restored power to 25,000 of the 30,000 customers left without service in the wake of last week's riots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles plans to cut the electricity rates of customers who conserve power this summer in a move meant to help other parts of the state avert blackouts. Under a plan approved Tuesday by the city water and power board, a typical residential customer would get a $4 monthly credit for consuming 10% less electricity than in the same period last year. They would also, of course, pay lower bills overall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1998 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight months after agreeing to the controversial idea, the City Council voted Wednesday to collect fees from private developers, utility companies and some city departments whose work involves cutting into city streets. With Mike Feuer and Mike Hernandez dissenting, the council voted 10-2 to approve the levies, which were strongly opposed by the utility companies and a builders' association. Several council members reluctantly supported the plan, but only after lengthy debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1998
A 6-inch water main in the 23000 block of Mosby Street in Woodland Hills broke Wednesday morning, flooding the residential street and causing pavement to buckle, authorities said. Thermal stress on the pipe from colder winter weather caused the water main to break shortly before 8 a.m., said Ed Freudenburg, a spokesman for the Department of Water and Power. The water main was repaired by noon. DWP crews shut off water to the 15 homes on the block while they repaired the break, Freudenburg said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1998 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Department of Water and Power General Manager S. David Freeman said Wednesday that Los Angeles' domestic electrical rates will decrease in five years, but hinted that water rates will rise. Freeman, appearing before a City Council committee to update lawmakers on his first--mostly successful--year on the job, said that the DWP is more than ready for the deregulated energy market and that customers who remain with the DWP will like what they see.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2000 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As California's energy crisis threatens to boil over, Los Angeles-area consumers facing the likely prospect of higher electricity bills are steaming. About 11 million customers in Southern California and millions more around the state could be hit with rate hikes of at least 10% next year. That would happen if the state Public Utilities Commission lifted the freeze on electricity prices to bail out utilities that are struggling to cover rising power costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2001 | MICHAEL FINNEGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles plans to cut the electricity rates of customers who conserve power this summer in a move meant to help other parts of the state avert blackouts. Under a plan approved Tuesday by the city water and power board, a typical residential customer would get a $4 monthly credit for consuming 10% less electricity than in the same period last year. They would also, of course, pay lower bills overall.
NEWS
April 11, 2001 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ and RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Government-owned utilities, including the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, were influential in driving wholesale electricity prices to levels that helped ignite California's exploding energy crisis during the summer and fall, according to public and confidential records. For months, Gov. Gray Davis, legislators and consumer advocates have chiefly blamed a few private power companies for throwing the state into darkness and economic chaos. But they are just part of the equation.
NEWS
February 18, 2001 | PETER H. KING
In the lobby of the 15-story downtown headquarters of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, a large digital scoreboard--powered, of course, by electricity--keeps track of the utility's campaign to erase a debt that three years ago exceeded $4 billion. The number changes constantly, and always in a downward direction. On Thursday afternoon, it was possible to watch the debt tick down in just one minute from $1,367,878,800 to $1,367,877,900--$15 a second.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2001 | NOAKI SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the rest of the state reeled from a man-made energy crisis, Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan and Department of Water and Power chief David Freeman assured city residents Friday that they are safe from the current troubles and would not face the rate hikes afflicting consumers across the state. "Today we declare war against any price increase for energy in the city of Los Angeles," Riordan announced at the DWP's Valley station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2000 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As California's energy crisis threatens to boil over, Los Angeles-area consumers facing the likely prospect of higher electricity bills are steaming. About 11 million customers in Southern California and millions more around the state could be hit with rate hikes of at least 10% next year. That would happen if the state Public Utilities Commission lifted the freeze on electricity prices to bail out utilities that are struggling to cover rising power costs.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With California plunging toward a free market revolution in energy, the general manager of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power has spent months warning that his historic and vital agency faces ruin without a major overhaul. His anxieties, however, largely have gone unheeded by the two commissions charged with revamping the City Charter, and have attracted almost no reaction from other city leaders.
NEWS
February 22, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attempt to settle a rancorous dispute in the Los Angeles City Council over residential water rates was dealt a serious blow when the city attorney's office declared a compromise proposal to be discriminatory, officials said Tuesday. The findings put into jeopardy a proposed water rate formula that would provide breaks to water users who live on large lots, in hot climates or have large families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Culminating nearly two years of study and often heated debate, the Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to provide water rate relief to residents who live on large lots, have large families or reside in hotter climates. Because the water rate changes would mostly benefit San Fernando Valley residents, the issue has pitted Valley lawmakers against council members from other communities, where rates will increase for many users.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seizing the initiative Monday on an issue that could redefine one of Los Angeles' most important city agencies, the general manager of the Department of Water and Power proposed tat it break free of the city so it can compete in a rapidly changing marketplace. The proposal by DWP chief S. David Freeman to an elected charter reform commission met with generally warm but slightly wary reaction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1998 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Department of Water and Power General Manager S. David Freeman said Wednesday that Los Angeles' domestic electrical rates will decrease in five years, but hinted that water rates will rise. Freeman, appearing before a City Council committee to update lawmakers on his first--mostly successful--year on the job, said that the DWP is more than ready for the deregulated energy market and that customers who remain with the DWP will like what they see.
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