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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2000 | ERIC MALNIC and TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Officials decided Wednesday to spend $82 million so Los Angeles County's trash can be hauled away by rail and dumped in the desert. The board of directors of the Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County signed agreements to purchase the Mesquite Regional Landfill in the back country of Imperial County and the Eagle Mountain Landfill in a remote area of Riverside County for $41 million apiece.
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NEWS
April 24, 2001 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County government expects to nearly double its energy bill for next year, from $75 million to a whopping $140 million, a hike that will cut into the county's surplus and could force service cuts if prices continue to rise through what all sides predict will be a difficult year in the state's energy crisis.
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NEWS
July 24, 1998 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of apathy, it took the simplest of complaints to awaken the fighting spirit of the Pulido family and their Latino middle-class neighbors in Maywood, a pistol-shaped city southeast of downtown Los Angeles. Edauco Pulido, a Mexican-born construction worker and homeowner, thought he was being overcharged on his water bill in 1995. He told two friends. Together they went to the offices of Maywood Mutual Water Company No. 2 to complain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2000 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A south Los Angeles County water district that was sharply criticized by state auditors last year now faces attacks on two new fronts: from a former top-ranking insider who alleges financial improprieties and from county officials who want to dismantle the agency. The latest troubles for the Water Replenishment District of Southern California, which serves 3.5 million people, come as a group of its 43 member cities seeks to secede.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1998 | DOUG SHUIT and JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With school districts scrambling to find money to replace or renovate aging buildings, voters approved five of the seven bond measures on the ballot Tuesday but sent two others to defeat in Torrance and Compton. Bond measures passed in Duarte, Montebello, Paramount, South Whittier and Temple City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1995
Covina residents might not be able to make up their minds about utility taxes, but come next year, they will probably be paying less. The council voted Tuesday to lower the tax from 8.25% to 7%, after a $400,000 windfall in tax revenue this year, said Councilman Tom Falls. The cut will save about $22 per household if it passes in a final December vote, said Mayor Thomas O'Leary. The utility tax has long been a controversial subject in Covina, and the latest chapter in the saga is no exception.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City Councilman Joel Wachs asked Friday for changes in a proposed new water rate structure to help San Fernando Valley residents--who would otherwise see their water bills soar while people in cooler parts of the city pay less. Wachs presented a plan at the council meeting that would make Valley residents eligible for discounts of up to 20% if they can prove they made a strong effort to conserve water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1993 | ED BOND
An agreement with Glendale and Pasadena to work as partners to buy power for the three cities could be signed within a week, said Ronald V. Stassi, general manager of Burbank's Public Service Department. Under the agreement, Glendale will buy a three-year lease on an office downtown and charge Pasadena and Burbank for their share of the costs. Each city provides its own computer and office equipment, as well as a staff of employees called schedulers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1990
The Lynwood City Council has decided to scale back a new utility tax after being deluged with complaints from angry residents. The council voted 4 to 1 Monday to enact a 3% tax on gas, telephone and electric bills, effective Jan. 1. The council initially had approved a 10% tax, but opted for the lower rate after angry residents packed the council chambers last week to protest the tax. The 3% tax is expected to increase residents' total utility bills an average of $35 a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1991 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South Coast Air Quality Management District board unanimously voted Friday for a stringent regulation to reduce pollution from the manufacture of electricity, one of the largest industrial contributors to the region's smog. The giant Southern California Edison Co., which is responsible for half the region's utility emissions, endorsed the measure, closing years of both public and private debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2000
Joining a growing chorus of public officials concerned over chromium 6 in local water, Assemblyman Jack Scott (D-Altadena) on Wednesday asked the Department of Health Services to begin testing for the chemical in tap water across the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2000 | ERIC MALNIC and TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Officials decided Wednesday to spend $82 million so Los Angeles County's trash can be hauled away by rail and dumped in the desert. The board of directors of the Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County signed agreements to purchase the Mesquite Regional Landfill in the back country of Imperial County and the Eagle Mountain Landfill in a remote area of Riverside County for $41 million apiece.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2000 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest secession movement in Los Angeles County has nothing to do with claims of poor government representation. Instead, it has everything to do with the price of Southern California's most precious commodity: water. Five cities have formally started the process to withdraw from the troubled water district that serves 3.5 million people in the south end of the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1999
Six southeast Los Angeles County cities failed in their effort Wednesday to obtain an injunction aimed at stopping a $22-million-plus water recycling plant being developed by the Water Replenishment District of Southern California. With bulldozers already at the Torrance site where the plant would be built, the cities sought an immediate stop to the project. The cities challenged the agency's rights to underground water, claiming it did not follow proper administrative procedure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1999 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Henry Taboada, in replacing a legend as city manager in Long Beach, promised that he would be bold and resourceful in finding money for the city. For his first initiative, he picked a doozy. Why not buy out Southern California Edison's nearly 100-year-old monopoly franchise in Long Beach, he suggested, and start a city-sponsored power company? The proposal, unveiled with little notice just before Christmas, has rocked the energy world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1999
About $1.2 billion in revenue bonds that will help finance a new rail expressway to the county's ports received strong ratings Tuesday from three Wall Street firms that evaluate the economic risks of such instruments. Fitch and Moody's issued A and A2 ratings respectively for $1 billion in bonds scheduled for sale to investors later this month by the Alameda Corridor Transportation Authority. Standard and Poor's rated the bonds BBB-plus.
NEWS
July 7, 1989 | JILL STEWART, Times Staff Writer
A national environmental group Thursday released a study showing that California's big utilities, which once led world conservation efforts, have cut such programs by more than half, a turnaround that the group warned could cost Californians both in energy bills and environmental damage. According to the study by the Natural Resources Defense Council, Southern California Edison Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1989
Local and regional water suppliers, along with the Environmental Defense Fund, announced that they will file suit today in Los Angeles County Superior Court to try to block the controversial expansion of an Azusa landfill that sits atop the ground water supply for the San Gabriel Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1998
A water main in Long Beach broke Thursday night, flooding a roughly 12-square-block area near Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue and Pacific Coast Highway. Water, a couple of feet deep in spots, was running down streets around the intersection, and streets in the area were closed. Firefighters were sandbagging around storefronts and working with Long Beach utility crews to get the line shut off.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1998
A residents group said it will gather voters' signatures to put an initiative on the March ballot on whether to continue the city's utility tax, which expires next year. Leaders of the Save Our Services Committee said they plan to gather more than 2,100 signatures required to allow voters to decide whether the tax should continue beyond its November 1999 expiration date. The five-member City Council has been unable to muster the four votes required by state law to place the issue before voters.
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