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BUSINESS
June 15, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newsstand owner Miguel Angel Aguayo pays an electricity bill that any Californian would envy: $1 a month. Aguayo gets his electricity for next to nothing because he steals it, with impunity. Like hundreds of thousands of other consumers and businesses large and small, Aguayo has a diablito, or little devil, an illegal device that connects his kiosk on the main drag of Paseo de la Reforma to overhead power lines. The $1 is what he pays an inspector to look the other way.
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BUSINESS
June 15, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newsstand owner Miguel Angel Aguayo pays an electricity bill that any Californian would envy: $1 a month. Aguayo gets his electricity for next to nothing because he steals it, with impunity. Like hundreds of thousands of other consumers and businesses large and small, Aguayo has a diablito, or little devil, an illegal device that connects his kiosk on the main drag of Paseo de la Reforma to overhead power lines. The $1 is what he pays an inspector to look the other way.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Ernesto Zedillo on Wednesday proposed constitutional reforms that would allow private investment in the electric power industry, taking a major step toward what would be one of the largest privatizations in Latin America. If Congress ratifies the reforms, Mexico would join a stream of Latin nations that have abandoned exclusive public ownership of their electric utilities in the last decade.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Ernesto Zedillo on Wednesday proposed constitutional reforms that would allow private investment in the electric power industry, taking a major step toward what would be one of the largest privatizations in Latin America. If Congress ratifies the reforms, Mexico would join a stream of Latin nations that have abandoned exclusive public ownership of their electric utilities in the last decade.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With power consumption growing at twice the U.S rate and its leaders gradually opening up the country to foreign investors, Mexico has long been viewed as a promised land for a host of U.S. energy companies. Now, after two years of interruptions caused by the presidential election, assassinations and an economic crisis, Mexico may finally begin to deliver.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
Wall Street loved Telefonos de Mexico, the Mexican phone company, when it was a penny stock. Now it's a penny stock and a Big Board stock, and investors still can't seem to get enough of either. While some investors worry that the stock's 180% rise this year is overdone, many analysts who understand the dynamics of the Mexican stock market believe that TelMex is just in the early stages of its advance.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Public Utilities Commission Chairman Daniel Fessler on Friday urged top Mexican energy officials to give serious consideration to a proposed pipeline that Southern California Gas Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric would build to carry natural gas to an electrical generating plant near Rosarito Beach.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Utilities Form Mexico Venture: Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. are working with Mexican holding company Proxima to win approval from the Mexican government to distribute natural gas south of the border. The partnership, called Natural Gas Distribution Co., would be one of the first outsiders to pierce Mexico's tightly controlled energy sector. The utilities hope to ship natural gas to Mexicali and later to Tijuana.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1997
British Aerospace said at the Paris air show it was joining U.S. defense giant Lockheed Martin Corp.'s bid for the Joint Strike Fighter program, the next-generation U.S. fighter plane. The decision ends months of speculation as to whether it would team up with Lockheed or rival Boeing Co. to bid to build up to 3,000 multirole fighters for the Pentagon. The Air Force currently flies different aircraft than the Navy and Marine Corps. . . .
BUSINESS
April 8, 1986 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
San Diego Gas & Electric has apparently become the nation's first utility to take advantage of sharply lower oil prices to generate and sell excess electricity, thus reversing its longtime reputation as a power-poor company. For the past month, SDG&E has been burning relatively cheap oil to generate electricity for sale to utilities in Mexico as well as Arizona and New Mexico.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With power consumption growing at twice the U.S rate and its leaders gradually opening up the country to foreign investors, Mexico has long been viewed as a promised land for a host of U.S. energy companies. Now, after two years of interruptions caused by the presidential election, assassinations and an economic crisis, Mexico may finally begin to deliver.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Public Utilities Commission Chairman Daniel Fessler on Friday urged top Mexican energy officials to give serious consideration to a proposed pipeline that Southern California Gas Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric would build to carry natural gas to an electrical generating plant near Rosarito Beach.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1991 | TOM PETRUNO
Wall Street loved Telefonos de Mexico, the Mexican phone company, when it was a penny stock. Now it's a penny stock and a Big Board stock, and investors still can't seem to get enough of either. While some investors worry that the stock's 180% rise this year is overdone, many analysts who understand the dynamics of the Mexican stock market believe that TelMex is just in the early stages of its advance.
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