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NEWS
April 28, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a town trapped in paradox. Residents are ripping out their lawns, rationing toilet flushes and buying plastic plants even though their town has access to more water than ever before. Despite such zealous conservation, some home water bills zoomed above $300 a month last summer. And elected officials warn that they may have to triple rates this year just to break even.
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NEWS
August 21, 2000 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even when company towns were the rule, there was no company town quite like this little hamlet clinging to the granite in the Sierra Nevada above Fresno. If you lived in Big Creek, you lived in an Edison house. An Edison truck delivered your milk. Dollars flowing from the hydropower plant in town paid for the Olympic-size swimming pool and the three-lane bowling alley at the local school. If a ball went over the fence, no one chased it.
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NEWS
June 28, 2000 | From Associated Press
Phones in 27,000 homes and businesses on the San Francisco Peninsula were still not working Tuesday after a fire in a Pacific Bell manhole knocked out service Monday afternoon. The phone company offered 300 cellular phones and extra public pay phones to help with the shortages in South San Francisco and other parts of San Mateo County.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | From Associated Press
Phones in 27,000 homes and businesses on the San Francisco Peninsula were still not working Tuesday after a fire in a Pacific Bell manhole knocked out service Monday afternoon. The phone company offered 300 cellular phones and extra public pay phones to help with the shortages in South San Francisco and other parts of San Mateo County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first agreement of its kind in the state, city-owned utilities in three medium-sized Southern California municipalities have joined forces with three similar utilities in the San Francisco Bay Area to exchange help after an earthquake or in other emergencies. Under the novel agreement, Burbank, Glendale and Pasadena have formed a partnership with the cities of Alameda, Santa Clara and Palo Alto.
NEWS
October 21, 1989
Developments in the quake: The Damage The state Office of Emergency Services now estimates damage at more than $4.2 billion, including about $1 billion to state highways and bridges. U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston's office estimates total damage at $6.85 billion, including $2.5 billion in San Francisco alone. The OES estimates 159 houses and 295 apartments with major damage, 2,214 houses and 1,928 apartments with minor damage. Hundreds of buildings were damaged or destroyed, some by aftershocks.
NEWS
August 21, 2000 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even when company towns were the rule, there was no company town quite like this little hamlet clinging to the granite in the Sierra Nevada above Fresno. If you lived in Big Creek, you lived in an Edison house. An Edison truck delivered your milk. Dollars flowing from the hydropower plant in town paid for the Olympic-size swimming pool and the three-lane bowling alley at the local school. If a ball went over the fence, no one chased it.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harriet Ralston woke in the darkness of her Santa Cruz Mountains home, picked her way across the debris-strewn kitchen floor to the sink, searched for a glass and turned on the faucet. Her reward: a few drops of water. It had been a day and half since a powerful earthquake, centered not far from her Los Gatos home, had struck, and still no running water. Not to mention electricity or gas service. "All I wanted was a drink of water, and instinctively, I went to the tap," she said.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Natural Gas Filling Stations Planned: Utilities in Northern California and Baltimore plan natural gas filling stations as they and other companies switch from gasoline- to natural gas-powered vans and trucks. Pacific Gas & Electric Co. said it and Chevron U.S.A. Inc. will operate natural gas facilities at Chevron stations in California. By the mid-1990s, Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. hopes to have 500 natural gas vehicles, about 20% of its fleet, and 20 filling stations in its region.
NEWS
November 19, 1992 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A chapter of Pasadena-area history is repeating itself. The solar motor is coming back a century after it made its original brief appearance in the west San Gabriel Valley. The setting then was pure California: a roadside attraction in South Pasadena that featured ostriches. Their improbable co-attraction was a "solar engine," an honest-to-gosh 15-horsepower steam rig powered by the sun, which pumped a thousand gallons a minute to irrigate the ranch that harbored the birds.
NEWS
April 28, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a town trapped in paradox. Residents are ripping out their lawns, rationing toilet flushes and buying plastic plants even though their town has access to more water than ever before. Despite such zealous conservation, some home water bills zoomed above $300 a month last summer. And elected officials warn that they may have to triple rates this year just to break even.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first agreement of its kind in the state, city-owned utilities in three medium-sized Southern California municipalities have joined forces with three similar utilities in the San Francisco Bay Area to exchange help after an earthquake or in other emergencies. Under the novel agreement, Burbank, Glendale and Pasadena have formed a partnership with the cities of Alameda, Santa Clara and Palo Alto.
NEWS
October 21, 1989
Developments in the quake: The Damage The state Office of Emergency Services now estimates damage at more than $4.2 billion, including about $1 billion to state highways and bridges. U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston's office estimates total damage at $6.85 billion, including $2.5 billion in San Francisco alone. The OES estimates 159 houses and 295 apartments with major damage, 2,214 houses and 1,928 apartments with minor damage. Hundreds of buildings were damaged or destroyed, some by aftershocks.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harriet Ralston woke in the darkness of her Santa Cruz Mountains home, picked her way across the debris-strewn kitchen floor to the sink, searched for a glass and turned on the faucet. Her reward: a few drops of water. It had been a day and half since a powerful earthquake, centered not far from her Los Gatos home, had struck, and still no running water. Not to mention electricity or gas service. "All I wanted was a drink of water, and instinctively, I went to the tap," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writers
If the government took over San Diego Gas & Electric Co. today, the new municipal utility might be able to buy lower-cost electricity from the Pacific Northwest, but it would be difficult to transmit that power to San Diego County customers, utility industry observers say. Investor-owned utilities control most of the power lines that link California with the Pacific Northwest.
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