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NEWS
January 13, 2001 | CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cold snap may be all it takes to leave the Pacific Northwest hydroelectric plants too thirsty to keep rescuing California and keep its own customers warm. Drier-than-usual conditions, coupled with California's ever-swirling energy crisis, have already pinched water supplies to the brink in Oregon and Washington. "We're barely scraping by," said Mike Hanson, spokesman for the Bonneville Power Administration in Oregon. It sells power from 29 federal dams in the Pacific Northwest.
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BUSINESS
October 6, 2001 | Reuters
Northwest Natural Gas Co. said it was in talks to acquire Enron Corp.'s Portland General Electric Co., a deal that would bring together two Oregon utilities. A deal would be a major step in Enron's plan to shed slower-growth assets and focus on its core energy marketing and trading business. A deal to sell Portland GE to Sierra Pacific Resources collapsed five months ago. Sources familiar with the situation said Northwest was offering $1.
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NEWS
December 19, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Skyrocketing energy prices and California's recent demands for the cheap federal hydropower that fuels the Pacific Northwest's $4-billion-a-year aluminum industry have unleashed widespread resentment in Washington state and Oregon--which are just beginning to feel the downside of the deregulation movement. Both states, whose residents traditionally have enjoyed some of the cheapest prices in the nation, face the same soaring rates that are plaguing California.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cold snap may be all it takes to leave the Pacific Northwest hydroelectric plants too thirsty to keep rescuing California and keep its own customers warm. Drier-than-usual conditions, coupled with California's ever-swirling energy crisis, have already pinched water supplies to the brink in Oregon and Washington. "We're barely scraping by," said Mike Hanson, spokesman for the Bonneville Power Administration in Oregon. It sells power from 29 federal dams in the Pacific Northwest.
NEWS
August 22, 1996 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massive blackout Aug. 10 in the West could have been avoided if officials in Oregon had simply notified California electric utilities when the first power line failed more than an hour and 40 minutes before the whole system went down, experts testified Wednesday.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2001 | Reuters
Northwest Natural Gas Co. said it was in talks to acquire Enron Corp.'s Portland General Electric Co., a deal that would bring together two Oregon utilities. A deal would be a major step in Enron's plan to shed slower-growth assets and focus on its core energy marketing and trading business. A deal to sell Portland GE to Sierra Pacific Resources collapsed five months ago. Sources familiar with the situation said Northwest was offering $1.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two big Western power companies will swap electricity in a novel plan to lower Southern California air pollution and save baby salmon on the Columbia River in the Northwest. Southern California Edison and the Bonneville Power Administration, which produces hydroelectric power on the Columbia River, will send each other electricity during different seasons of the year.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES
The troubled Trojan Nuclear Plant in Oregon--subject of three failed efforts by activists to shut it down--on Monday was ordered permanently closed by the chief owner's board of directors. The vote by directors of Portland General Electric, based in Portland, appears to put an end to a long-running battle between activists, who contended that the plant was dangerous, and the utility, which argued that Trojan was safe and that its electrical power was needed to satisfy demand.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2000 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Let's be clear, the fact that the state botched the job of deregulation to begin with is one reason California's electricity market is such a mess. But failure to build a single new power plant in the state even as California's economy expanded its use of electricity is the basic cause of today's shortages and soaring prices in San Diego, Orange County and other areas. Still, some simple steps can be taken by regulators, legislators and Gov. Gray Davis to provide immediate relief.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON and NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As San Diego County continued to sizzle Monday afternoon, residents cranked up their air conditioners and fans, creating a record demand for electrical power. Inside "Mission Control" at San Diego Gas & Electric Co., workers scurried and computers hummed to meet the record-breaking demand for electrical power--all 3,335 megawatts of it. "We start to stress the system, but we've always been able to supply the power," said Bernie Alfonso, SDG&E's manager of power control.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Skyrocketing energy prices and California's recent demands for the cheap federal hydropower that fuels the Pacific Northwest's $4-billion-a-year aluminum industry have unleashed widespread resentment in Washington state and Oregon--which are just beginning to feel the downside of the deregulation movement. Both states, whose residents traditionally have enjoyed some of the cheapest prices in the nation, face the same soaring rates that are plaguing California.
NEWS
August 22, 1996 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massive blackout Aug. 10 in the West could have been avoided if officials in Oregon had simply notified California electric utilities when the first power line failed more than an hour and 40 minutes before the whole system went down, experts testified Wednesday.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES
The troubled Trojan Nuclear Plant in Oregon--subject of three failed efforts by activists to shut it down--on Monday was ordered permanently closed by the chief owner's board of directors. The vote by directors of Portland General Electric, based in Portland, appears to put an end to a long-running battle between activists, who contended that the plant was dangerous, and the utility, which argued that Trojan was safe and that its electrical power was needed to satisfy demand.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two big Western power companies will swap electricity in a novel plan to lower Southern California air pollution and save baby salmon on the Columbia River in the Northwest. Southern California Edison and the Bonneville Power Administration, which produces hydroelectric power on the Columbia River, will send each other electricity during different seasons of the year.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1997 | JAMES FLANIGAN
As the limping relic of the giant that built Los Angeles, its obituary already written, the Department of Water & Power nonetheless is attracting proposals from partners eager to help it change, profit, grow and survive. This week will be critical for the organization that between 1913 and 1927 traded water for annexation of neighboring communities and made Los Angeles the largest metropolitan area in the United States. Today DWP supplies electricity to 1.3 million households and businesses.
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