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BUSINESS
March 7, 1986
Reacting to plummeting oil prices, Southern California Gas Co. asked the Public Utilities Commission to let it lower the price that it charges electric utilities for gas to fuel their power plants. Unless that rate is cut, the company warned, the electric utilities--among its largest customers--will switch to lower-priced oil to generate power. The proposed cut would drop the current rate of $2.80 per million British thermal units to $2.25 for the 30 days beginning March 14.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2010 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Executives with the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power on Tuesday issued a sharply worded defense of their decision to withhold $73.5 million from city coffers in the middle of a recent fight over electricity rates, saying they did so to protect the utility's credit rating and its customers. During a lively exchange with City Council members, several of whom made no effort to disguise their disdain for the DWP, current and former managers of the nation's largest municipally owned utility responded to a report that accused them of misleading both the council and the public about the agency's financial health.
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NEWS
April 6, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Negotiating around the clock, a House committee finished drafting its version of a new Clean Air Act on Thursday night and sent to the floor a bill that is tougher in some provisions than the landmark legislation passed by the Senate earlier this week. The House bill, which contains more stringent measures to curb urban smog and airborne toxic chemicals than does its Senate counterpart, was approved by the House Energy and Commerce Committee by a vote of 42 to 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2008 | David Zahniser
A package of rate hikes for water and electricity won approval from the City Council on Wednesday, ending six months of debate. The council voted 13 to 1 on a trio of electrical rate increases and 11 to 3 on a pair of water rate increases. The decision will leave electricity customers paying 23% more by 2010 after four years' worth of DWP surcharges are factored in. DWP customers will pay roughly 10% more for water by summer 2009 after an increase from the Metropolitan Water District is included.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1989
Driving for Dollars: What may be one of the best jobs on the East Coast was uncovered recently when Boston Edison Co. sought a rate increase: Budget documents revealed that the chairman's chauffeur is paid $60,000 a year. Not even Donald J. Trump's driver makes that much and he's been with the real estate tycoon for 10 years. The chauffeur's salary is among the $185,000 that the utility spent last year to provide company officials with cars and chauffeurs. News of the expenditures comes as the company seeks an $85-million rate increase, or about $50 more a year from its customers.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Customers of Southern California Edison could see a slight decrease in rates as a result of a $250-million settlement with the consumer advocacy arm of the California Public Utilities Commission over Edison's purchase of power from an affiliated company. Because of the settlement, the Rosemead-based utility said Friday, it is adjusting its third-quarter earnings down 15%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1995
The column by Peter Navarro (Commentary, Sept. 15) on the restructuring of California's electric utility industry was reckless in its distortion of the facts. The move to a more fully competitive marketplace in California promises greater choice for customers, and inevitably, lower costs. The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), the governor's office and the Legislature deserve credit for their roles in encouraging a model of building consensus between organizations with competing interests in the process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1998
I am thankful that you gave equal time in reporting on Prop. 9 (Sept. 27), the initiative to block the bailout of the utility industry by California ratepayers. However, there are errors I would like to address. The writer says the legislative analyst agrees that the passing of Prop. 9 will lead to tax increases. On the contrary, the state legislative analyst's office has studied Prop. 9 more carefully than any other ballot measure. They did not put the possibility of a tax increase in the voter's pamphlet as it was too misleading, and in the words of deputy legislative analyst Mac Taylor, "It just seemed almost inconceivable."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1997 | DAWN HOBBS
Rather than double the water and sewer rates of low-income seniors, Camarillo city officials plan to look for a way to circumvent the consequences of Proposition 218. The City Council will listen to testimony Monday evening before deciding whether to discontinue the reduced rates that low-income seniors have received since 1977. Given the language of the tax-cutting measure, however, the council has basically been given no choice.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1995
"Gauging the Sensitivity of CEO Pay Pays Off Big Time" (Jan. 8) describes John Bryson's compensation package as low-risk. In fact, the SCEcorp board in successive steps has made Bryson's compensation one of the most performance-based in the utility industry. Approximately two-thirds of Bryson's compensation is totally at risk based on company results. In the view of SCEcorp's board of directors, these steps have resulted in a sound balance between base salary and performance-based compensation for the chief executive of one of the nation's leading energy providers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2007 | David Zahniser
The City Council voted Tuesday to delay a vote on proposed water and electricity rate hikes until late February -- after voters decide the fate of a $243-million telephone utility users tax. Council members said they wanted more answers from newly hired DWP General Manager H. David Nahai on the utility's efforts to address staffing shortages and fix aging infrastructure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
A state lawmaker who hopes to become mayor of the proposed San Fernando Valley city moved Thursday to protect Valley ratepayers from what he said would be unfair water and power prices if the region secedes. State Sen. Richard Alarcon (D-Sylmar) introduced legislation that would prohibit Los Angeles from charging higher utility rates.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2001 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California's big utilities expressed serious doubts Friday about how state officials plan to divvy up the revenue from higher electricity rates. State officials, however, said they are planning to revise the way they allot the rate increase of 3 cents per kilowatt hour amid questions over whether there will be enough money to cover electricity costs for the utilities and the state Department of Water Resources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2001 | GERRIE SCHIPSKE, Gerrie Schipske is a nurse practitioner, part-time instructor at the Cal State Long Beach Center for Public Policy and Administration and former Democratic congressional candidate
The noise being generated in Washington and Sacramento over who is to blame for California's energy crisis brings to mind the adage that when hippos begin to fight, it is the ants who should worry. I work with a health care/social services agency that receives numerous calls from people asking for help with their electricity, gas and water bills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After reeling from the loss of 50,000 Navy and aerospace industry jobs in the mid-'90s, the city of Long Beach was hoping for a period of municipal peace and prosperity. Then the energy crisis hit the state's fifth-biggest city in the gut six months ago, and nothing has been the same since. Long Beach is battling energy producers in court for money needed to keep from having to cut back on police and fire services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2001 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local school districts will be hard hit by utility rate hikes, which could raise bills by as much as $1 million a year in some districts and put some services at risk, officials said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2008 | David Zahniser
A package of rate hikes for water and electricity won approval from the City Council on Wednesday, ending six months of debate. The council voted 13 to 1 on a trio of electrical rate increases and 11 to 3 on a pair of water rate increases. The decision will leave electricity customers paying 23% more by 2010 after four years' worth of DWP surcharges are factored in. DWP customers will pay roughly 10% more for water by summer 2009 after an increase from the Metropolitan Water District is included.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2001 | GERRIE SCHIPSKE, Gerrie Schipske is a nurse practitioner, part-time instructor at the Cal State Long Beach Center for Public Policy and Administration and former Democratic congressional candidate
The noise being generated in Washington and Sacramento over who is to blame for California's energy crisis brings to mind the adage that when hippos begin to fight, it is the ants who should worry. I work with a health care/social services agency that receives numerous calls from people asking for help with their electricity, gas and water bills.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Gray Davis, convinced that he can't win votes by delivering bad news, avoided the task of telling Californians what virtually all experts have been saying for months--that electricity bills are going up. Indeed, on Tuesday, the Democratic governor quickly moved to distance himself from a rate hike of as much as 46% that was approved by the California Public Utilities Commission, led by his appointee Loretta Lynch.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2001 | Nancy Rivera Brooks
As state legislators continue to search for a solution to California's electricity crisis, a federal judge will consider today whether to allow Edison International's Southern California Edison unit and Pacific Gas & Electric to pass uncollected electricity costs on to customers. The utilities have rolled up huge debts because they bought electricity at a high wholesale rate but could sell it to customers only at a relatively low retail price, which is frozen by law.
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