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NEWS
February 5, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it got too hot in Galina Borovitskaya's apartment the other day, she opened the door to the balcony to let in the frigid winter air--then forgot about it and went out shopping. When she got back, the 40-year-old housewife berated herself for the absent-mindedness that had killed some of her windowsill plants. But at least she had no need to worry about the effect on her heating bill. She pays 10 cents a month. And even if she took a monthlong hot shower, she would still only pay 10 cents.
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NEWS
April 7, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marina Yarovov was walking her two dogs in a field near her apartment when the earth opened up beneath her and she fell into a pit of muddy, boiling water. In agony, she tried to climb out of the hole as a friend ran for help. But within minutes, the 43-year-old mother of two was dead--boiled alive in the water that heats the homes and shops of her neighborhood through a vast subterranean network of pipes.
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BUSINESS
May 12, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening what it hopes will become a major market, Wahlco Environmental Systems Inc. said Tuesday that it will provide some of its pollution reduction equipment to a large Russian electrical utility. The customer, which Wahlco would identify only as a large Russian utility in the Ural region, will pay for the test of a flue gas conditioning system for the boilers in a generating station. If the test is successful, the utility will buy one or more of the units.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And you thought electricity deregulation in California was a rough game. The brash young reformer running Russia's powerful electricity monopoly was the target of an attempt by Soviet-era holdovers to oust him on Wednesday. He survived--but it was a boardroom clash for control some regard as a sign of this country's increasing economic stability and by others as evidence of its shakiness.
NEWS
December 25, 1995 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the women storm in, full of frost and fury, Valentina Bunina fixes her face in a professional frown. She knows what will follow: tears, moans, anguish and despair. "When will we have heat?" the women cry, tugging tight their wool scarves. They shove their way into the tiny town hall, eight of them, then a dozen, then more. "If we could just have a little warmth, just a little . . . ," one pleads. Another scolds sharply: "We're dying here! We're freezing to death!
NEWS
April 7, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marina Yarovov was walking her two dogs in a field near her apartment when the earth opened up beneath her and she fell into a pit of muddy, boiling water. In agony, she tried to climb out of the hole as a friend ran for help. But within minutes, the 43-year-old mother of two was dead--boiled alive in the water that heats the homes and shops of her neighborhood through a vast subterranean network of pipes.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And you thought electricity deregulation in California was a rough game. The brash young reformer running Russia's powerful electricity monopoly was the target of an attempt by Soviet-era holdovers to oust him on Wednesday. He survived--but it was a boardroom clash for control some regard as a sign of this country's increasing economic stability and by others as evidence of its shakiness.
WORLD
March 17, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Police said Tuesday that they were searching for two homeless men who might have stolen gas valves from an apartment building in northern Russia, leading to a huge predawn explosion that left at least 32 people dead. But a municipal official said the utility lines in Arkhangelsk, 600 miles north of Moscow, were so poorly maintained that simple deterioration could have caused the tragedy. At least 11 residents remained unaccounted for, and 24 others were injured, seven critically.
NEWS
December 25, 1995 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the women storm in, full of frost and fury, Valentina Bunina fixes her face in a professional frown. She knows what will follow: tears, moans, anguish and despair. "When will we have heat?" the women cry, tugging tight their wool scarves. They shove their way into the tiny town hall, eight of them, then a dozen, then more. "If we could just have a little warmth, just a little . . . ," one pleads. Another scolds sharply: "We're dying here! We're freezing to death!
BUSINESS
May 12, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening what it hopes will become a major market, Wahlco Environmental Systems Inc. said Tuesday that it will provide some of its pollution reduction equipment to a large Russian electrical utility. The customer, which Wahlco would identify only as a large Russian utility in the Ural region, will pay for the test of a flue gas conditioning system for the boilers in a generating station. If the test is successful, the utility will buy one or more of the units.
NEWS
February 5, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it got too hot in Galina Borovitskaya's apartment the other day, she opened the door to the balcony to let in the frigid winter air--then forgot about it and went out shopping. When she got back, the 40-year-old housewife berated herself for the absent-mindedness that had killed some of her windowsill plants. But at least she had no need to worry about the effect on her heating bill. She pays 10 cents a month. And even if she took a monthlong hot shower, she would still only pay 10 cents.
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