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January 7, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In April, a year after he cast his vote in this nation's first multiracial election, Remigius Maleke celebrated his part in the new democracy with an unusual act of patriotism. He began to pay his bills. Like most other blacks in this rural township and across South Africa, the 44-year-old teacher had refused for almost a decade to pay for electricity, water, sewers or other basic services, honoring boycotts and strikes called by liberation groups to bring down the apartheid regime.
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NEWS
January 31, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A single bare bulb dangles on a cord, but the dim glow is enough for a shack so tiny it is cramped with a table, three broken chairs and a bed stretching from wall to wall. The kitchen is a battered bucket, filled at the tap outside for drinking, washing and bathing. Faded magazine photos of soccer stars and a 1993 calendar are the only decorations. Hammered together from sheets of rusting tin, the one-room shanty is freezing in winter and a sweatbox in summer.
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NEWS
November 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Authorities imposed emergency regulations and a curfew on two black townships near the capital of Pretoria to quell anti-government rioting that left two dead and 25 wounded. The battles were triggered by the suspension of power to the area because residents have been boycotting payment of electric bills to protest poor municipal services. Also, President Frederik W. de Klerk announced that he will increase his Cabinet by two ministers to 20, effective Wednesday.
NEWS
January 7, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In April, a year after he cast his vote in this nation's first multiracial election, Remigius Maleke celebrated his part in the new democracy with an unusual act of patriotism. He began to pay his bills. Like most other blacks in this rural township and across South Africa, the 44-year-old teacher had refused for almost a decade to pay for electricity, water, sewers or other basic services, honoring boycotts and strikes called by liberation groups to bring down the apartheid regime.
NEWS
January 31, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A single bare bulb dangles on a cord, but the dim glow is enough for a shack so tiny it is cramped with a table, three broken chairs and a bed stretching from wall to wall. The kitchen is a battered bucket, filled at the tap outside for drinking, washing and bathing. Faded magazine photos of soccer stars and a 1993 calendar are the only decorations. Hammered together from sheets of rusting tin, the one-room shanty is freezing in winter and a sweatbox in summer.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Authorities imposed emergency regulations and a curfew on two black townships near the capital of Pretoria to quell anti-government rioting that left two dead and 25 wounded. The battles were triggered by the suspension of power to the area because residents have been boycotting payment of electric bills to protest poor municipal services. Also, President Frederik W. de Klerk announced that he will increase his Cabinet by two ministers to 20, effective Wednesday.
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