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Utilities Suits

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NEWS
March 28, 1998 | From Associated Press
A jury on Friday ordered a utility to pay more than $3 million to the families of four children who contracted a rare form of cancer after the cleanup of coal tar at a plant that made gas from coal. Two contractors were cleared. The families contend that their children contracted neuroblastoma after a 1987 cleanup at the long-abandoned plant owned by Central Illinois Public Service Co. of Springfield stirred up coal tar dust and fumes.
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BUSINESS
September 11, 2004 | From Associated Press
A federal appeals court in San Francisco on Friday refused to reinstate a Washington state public utility's class-action lawsuit that claimed power companies illegally drove up electricity prices during California's energy crisis four years ago. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the Snohomish Public Utility District's complaint should be handled by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, not a court.
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NEWS
November 4, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
American Electric Power Corp., Cinergy Corp., Illinova Corp., Southern Co. and three other Midwest and Southern utilities are being sued by the U.S. government for allegedly polluting the air with emissions from 17 coal-fired electricity-generating plants. The Justice Department filed the lawsuits to recover what officials said could be as much as $1 billion in fines and penalties for violations of the Clean Air Act dating back 20 years and to cover the cost of pollution-control devices.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
A federal judge in San Diego has dismissed a class-action lawsuit brought by a Washington state utility, which charged that energy firms colluded to create artificially high electricity prices. U.S. District Judge Robert H. Whaley said in his order Monday that the complaint by Snohomish Public Utility District belonged in front of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, not a court. Snohomish also has filed complaints to FERC, which regulates wholesale power prices.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kenetech Sues Rival Wind Energy Firm: The nation's largest wind-energy company said it has filed a patent lawsuit against New World Power Corp. of Lime Rock, Conn., and the German wind turbine manufacturer Enercon GmbH. The suit, filed in federal court in San Francisco, where Kenetech is based, alleges patent violations on the series of electronic devices that prepare the electricity produced by wind turbines for distribution over transmission lines.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1999 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Douglas Ames wanted revenge. Four years ago, the energy storage company he founded went out of business and Ames blamed Southern California Edison, which he claimed reneged on a deal to pay him. After Ames, 40, was forced to shutter his Huntington Beach business, he signed up for night classes at Western State Law School in Fullerton to start a new career. He passed the bar exam last June and on Tuesday, Ames won his very first case: a $6-million verdict against . . . Southern California Edison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1991 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Calabasas couple sued the Las Virgenes Municipal Water District in U.S. District Court on Tuesday, charging that water-rationing rules unfairly discriminate against new residents of the western San Fernando Valley. The suit by Robert Ross, an attorney, asked for an increased water allotment on the grounds that the rationing plan adopted by the district in January grants new residents only 70% as much water as the average customer in the hottest months.
NEWS
September 15, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Florida utility is suing a dying man for more than $250,000 to recoup the cost of fighting his lawsuit that claimed power lines caused the leukemia that killed his wife and is now killing him, the Miami Herald reported. Florida Power & Light Co said it wants Leonard Glazer to repay $267,885 of the costs of a lawsuit it won last May in which Glazer claimed the utility's power lines above his house caused him and his wife to contract leukemia.
NEWS
August 23, 1996 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously affirmed a lower court's decision that bars homeowners from suing utilities for alleged property value losses caused by fear of electromagnetic fields generated by power lines. Lawsuits against utility companies alleging damages caused by electromagnetic fields, or EMF, began to proliferate about five years ago amid growing public concern that EMF could cause cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1991 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Southern California Gas Co. should be held responsible for a con artists' scheme that bilked dozens of investors of millions of dollars, a Los Angeles Superior Court jury was told Monday. The gas company knew there was "a high probability that these people would be injured but they made a decision to let (them) suffer," said J. Michael Hennigan, attorney for two of the five plaintiffs in a lawsuit against the company and nine other defendants.
NEWS
November 4, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
American Electric Power Corp., Cinergy Corp., Illinova Corp., Southern Co. and three other Midwest and Southern utilities are being sued by the U.S. government for allegedly polluting the air with emissions from 17 coal-fired electricity-generating plants. The Justice Department filed the lawsuits to recover what officials said could be as much as $1 billion in fines and penalties for violations of the Clean Air Act dating back 20 years and to cover the cost of pollution-control devices.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1999 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Douglas Ames wanted revenge. Four years ago, the energy storage company he founded went out of business and Ames blamed Southern California Edison, which he claimed reneged on a deal to pay him. After Ames, 40, was forced to shutter his Huntington Beach business, he signed up for night classes at Western State Law School in Fullerton to start a new career. He passed the bar exam last June and on Tuesday, Ames won his very first case: a $6-million verdict against . . . Southern California Edison.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1999 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Douglas Ames wanted revenge. When the energy storage company he founded went out of business four years ago, Ames blamed Southern California Edison, which he claimed reneged on a deal to pay him. His business shuttered, Ames enrolled in night classes at Western State Law School in Fullerton to start a new career. He passed the bar exam in June and on Tuesday, Ames won his first case: a $6-million verdict against . . . Southern California Edison.
NEWS
March 28, 1998 | From Associated Press
A jury on Friday ordered a utility to pay more than $3 million to the families of four children who contracted a rare form of cancer after the cleanup of coal tar at a plant that made gas from coal. Two contractors were cleared. The families contend that their children contracted neuroblastoma after a 1987 cleanup at the long-abandoned plant owned by Central Illinois Public Service Co. of Springfield stirred up coal tar dust and fumes.
NEWS
September 15, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Florida utility is suing a dying man for more than $250,000 to recoup the cost of fighting his lawsuit that claimed power lines caused the leukemia that killed his wife and is now killing him, the Miami Herald reported. Florida Power & Light Co said it wants Leonard Glazer to repay $267,885 of the costs of a lawsuit it won last May in which Glazer claimed the utility's power lines above his house caused him and his wife to contract leukemia.
NEWS
August 23, 1996 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously affirmed a lower court's decision that bars homeowners from suing utilities for alleged property value losses caused by fear of electromagnetic fields generated by power lines. Lawsuits against utility companies alleging damages caused by electromagnetic fields, or EMF, began to proliferate about five years ago amid growing public concern that EMF could cause cancer.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1993 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A state Public Utilities Commission judge on Tuesday recommended that Pacific Bell be fined $65 million for repeatedly charging its customers improper late fees. If upheld by the full commission, the fine would be the largest ever levied against the phone company, consumer advocates said.
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Pacific Gas & Electric Co., the nation's largest investor-owned utility, agreed Tuesday to pay $333 million to residents of the tiny desert community of Hinkley, Calif., who blamed cancers and other diseases on contaminated water leaking from a gas pumping station. PG&E deputy general counsel Robert Bordon said the settlement is the largest one the San Francisco-based utility has ever agreed to in response to an environmental complaint.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kenetech Sues Rival Wind Energy Firm: The nation's largest wind-energy company said it has filed a patent lawsuit against New World Power Corp. of Lime Rock, Conn., and the German wind turbine manufacturer Enercon GmbH. The suit, filed in federal court in San Francisco, where Kenetech is based, alleges patent violations on the series of electronic devices that prepare the electricity produced by wind turbines for distribution over transmission lines.
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